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Jun 17, 2008 - 4:06:48 PM

472 posts since 11/14/2007

Once at a musical gathering, Murphy and I had the honor of singing "Highway of Regret" along with Chubby. He was truly a musical giant, and it's hard to find a musician anywhere in his class.

Red

Red Henry
murphymethod.com/red2.html

Jun 17, 2008 - 4:25:14 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by maplebridge48

Once at a musical gathering, Murphy and I had the honor of singing "Highway of Regret" along with Chubby. He was truly a musical giant, and it's hard to find a musician anywhere in his class.

Red

Red Henry
murphymethod.com/red2.html



Red,

I love that song and I appreciate your comments about Chubby and singing along with him.

Thank you,

Phil
Katy, Tx

"Banjo isn''t that hard - just requires a lot of time and focused concentration, practicing rightly and with intent rather than noodling. Keep at it." (Ron Block)

"Remember to enjoy the banjo journey" [Chris Quinn]

Jul 26, 2008 - 2:55:45 PM

SandyR

USA

2173 posts since 10/23/2007

Kemo Sabe: Yes, I had seen Rich in Pleasanton's post about "My Little Home in Tennessee," which he says he believes in a Carter Family song. The latter is what I was correcting.

Jul 28, 2008 - 2:25:11 PM

7183 posts since 3/20/2008

FYI "My Little Home In Tennessee"

This song was written in 1926 by Carson J. Robison, partner of Vernon Dalhart (Al Craver). Vernon Dalhart recorded the song in 1925 for Columbia as Al Craver; Vernon Dalhart recorded it again in 1925 for Victor; Vernon Dalhart & Company recorded it for Edison (1926); and Vernon Dalhart recorded it yet again in 1926 for Brunswick (1927), for Vocalion (1927), and for Supertone (1927 & 1931). Sid Harkreader & Grady Moore recorded it in 1927 for Paramount/Broadway (issue dates unknown), Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Cross in 1928 for Columbia (1931), Harman Canada for Gennett/Supertone in 1929, and Bradley Kincaid in 1929 for Supertone and for Champion (Dan Hughey). The Carter Family did record this song in 1932 for RCA Victor, but that cut was not released by Victor (RCA Camden eventually issued it for the 1971 Carter Family album Lonesome Pine Special; Rounder Records issued it for the 1997 Carter Family album Give Me the Roses While I Live, Bear Family Records issued it for the 2000 Carter Family box set In the Shadow of Clinch Mountain, and Recall Records issued it for the 2003 Carter Family album Sunshine In the Shadows). Rambling Kid & the Professor recorded it in 1937 for Melotone and then again in 1937 for ARC as “In My Little Home In Tennessee”. The Blue Sky Boys recorded it in 1937 for RCA Victor’s Bluebird and Montgomery Ward labels under the title “In My Little Home In Tennessee” and crediting Robison (Bear Family Records reissued it for the 2003 Blue Sky Boys box set The Sunny Side of Life). Mac Wiseman & the Country Boys released this version for Dot Records on a 78 rpm single in March 1954 (Dot reissued the song for his 1961 album Sings Fire Ball Mail, Bear Family for the 2003 Mac Wiseman box set ‘Tis Sweet To be Remembered, and Music Mill for the 2004 compilation Rocky Top Tennessee). Mac Wiseman & the Shenandoah Cutups released the song again for the 1977 Vetco Records Mac Wiseman album New Traditions (Rebel Records reissued it for the 1989 Mac Wiseman album Classic Bluegrass, and Crosscut Records reissued it for the 200? Mac Wiseman album New Traditions, Volume II). Among others, the Wilburn Brothers released the song for Decca in 196?, Mac Martin for his 1968 Rural Rhythm album With the Travelin’ Blues, the Bass Mountain Boys for their 1994 Pinecastle album Carolina Calling Me, the IIIrd Tyme Out for their 1995 Rounder album Letter To Home, Bill Harrell for his 1998 Webco album Webco Classics, Volume IV, and Bill Jorgenson for his 2001 Orchard label album The Father of Wisconsin Bluegrass.

Jul 28, 2008 - 10:58:58 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

Sandy and Richard -

Thanks for the updates on the background of 'My Little Home In Tenessee'. Richard, this song seems to be of particular interest to you and I am wondering if it is a song you perform from time to time ..... at any rate I appreciate learning about details of the history of the song. I have often had trouble figuring out the author of songs - it is sometimes not too difficult to find out the artist that performed a particular song but it seems to me the author of the song often times is harder to detemine. I am thinking that authors should receive more credit for their incredible talents.

On another subject song - over the years I have heard a particular melody that has been used in at least 5 songs I have heard and I have sometimes wondered where the melody actually came from and who wrote the melody. The song is maybe most recognized these days as the melody in 'Great Speckled Bird'..... a beautiful song that has a chord progression of I IV V I......and the same melody is used in several other songs such as: 'I'm Thinking Tonight Of My Blue Eyes', 'The Wild Side Of Life', 'It Wasn't God Who Made Honky-Tonk Angels'.....along with 'Great Speckled Bird' and another song that combines the title lines of the four I have mentioned into what I think might be called a 'novelty' song. I know who the performing artists were over the decades for each of these songs but I am wondering who wrote the melody of that song in the beginning.

Thanks for any comments.

Phil
Katy, Tx

"Banjo isn''t that hard - just requires a lot of time and focused concentration, practicing rightly and with intent rather than noodling. Keep at it." (Ron Block)

"Remember to enjoy the banjo journey" [Chris Quinn]

Jul 29, 2008 - 10:22:06 AM

7183 posts since 3/20/2008

You're welcome, Phil, and thank you for continuing this useful thread. The research you noted is from a songbook I have been working on for a long time--some 1200+ songs. Here is something on your other query, GREAT SPECKLED BIRD:

This was Roy Acuff's most requested song (he copyrighted it in 1937) after he first recorded it with his Smoky Mountain Boys in 1936 for Columbia/Conqueror/ARC/OKeh, for Melotone/OKeh (1938), and for Vocalion (1938). This was the song that brought him to the attention of the Grand Ole Opry. He recorded “Great Speckled Bird No. 2” in 1937 for ARC/Conqueror/OKeh/Melotone, for Vocalion (1938), and for Columbia (1946). He credited the words to a Rev. Guy Smith from the Carolinas, but Roy provided the melody, a variant of I'M THINKING TONIGHT OF MY BLUE EYES (the melody is originally from the folk traditions of the British Isles). Roy said he first heard the song in the 1930s by a group from Bob Jones University called Charles Swain and the Black Shirts. The song was popular at that time among the brush-arbor evangelists and in some Pentecostal churches in the Ozarks. Some sources say it was written in 1934 by Guy ‘Uncle George’ Smith. Jack Hilliard & Leslie Palmer recorded it for Decca in 1938, the Morris Brothers in 1938 for Bluebird (1939), Roy Hall & His Blue Ridge Entertainers for Conqueror in 1938 as “Answer To Great Speckled Bird”, and Roy Shaffer for Bluebird and Montgomery Ward in 1939. The Carter Family included it in their 1939 border radio broadcasts (Arhoolie Records released it for their 1999 album On Border Radio, Volume III). The melody was used again in 1952 for Hank Thompson’s hit THE WILD SIDE OF LIFE. The inspiration for this song is from the book of Jeremiah (Jer XII:9), "Mine heritage is unto me as a speckled bird, the birds round about are against her." Also a hit for the Louvin Brothers--they included it on their tribute to Roy Acuff for Capitol Records in 1967. Charlie Monroe’s Boys recorded this version for Bluebird/Montgomery Ward in 1938 (RCA Camden reissued it for the 1963 album Early Blue Grass Music, RCA reissued it for the 1997 album The Essential Bill Monroe & the Monroe Brothers, and Old Homestead Records reissued it for the 2001 album Charlie Monroe’s Boys). According to Peter Feldmann: “they are not the Monroe Brothers. Rather, they are early Victor recordings of Charlie Monroe & Band, which came to be known as the Kentucky Partners. The mandolin player you hear is not Bill Monroe, but is Zeke Morris, who sounds eerily close to Bill's mandolin and vocal styles of the time”. Among others, Rose Maddox released it for her 1960 Stetson Hat Records album Glorybound Train, Don Reno & Bill Harrell for Rural Rhythm Records in 1967 (Rural Rhythm Records reissued the album in 1997), Carl Story for the Puritan label in 1973, the Armstrong Twins for their 1981 Arhoolie album Just Country Boys, Jim & Jesse for their 1995 CMH Records album 24 Greatest Hits, Wilma Lee & Stoney Cooper for their 1996 Hollywood album Walking My Lord Up Calvary Hill, the Osborne Brothers for their 1998 Pinecastle Records album Hyden, and Mac Wiseman for his 2005 Music Mill Entertainment album 15 of My Gospel Favorites.

Jul 29, 2008 - 12:50:32 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

Richard,

Thanks for the info re: 'Great Speckled Bird' and the heads up on your research into all those songs. That will be a very interesting book you are creating and I want to purchase a copy when you are ready with it.

I appreciate your comments about the orginal melody being from folk traditions ... the British Isles... I attended a banjo camp awhile back and ask one of the instructors about the melody of 'Great Speckle Bird'. His response was very similar to yours and I know that instructor is a serious 'student' of music history. (He's also a great banjo player who lives in New Mexico).

Also, thank you for the comment re: this thread.

Phil
Katy, TX

"Banjo isn''t that hard - just requires a lot of time and focused concentration, practicing rightly and with intent rather than noodling. Keep at it." (Ron Block)

"Remember to enjoy the banjo journey" [Chris Quinn]

Edited by - Kemo Sabe on 07/29/2008 13:04:05

Jul 30, 2008 - 5:16:58 PM

jcomfs

USA

189 posts since 2/25/2005

do you have chord progressions for old kentucky bound, and shady lane?
thanks, jc

Jul 31, 2008 - 7:37:13 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by jcomfs

do you have chord progressions for old kentucky bound, and shady lane?
thanks, jc





JC

I am not familiar with these two songs - I have looked for chord information but unable to locate that info. I found the lyrics to 'Old Kentucky Bound' but not the chords. I am looking forward to hearing the songs and I will be on the lookout for the chords.

Phil

"Banjo isn''t that hard - just requires a lot of time and focused concentration, practicing rightly and with intent rather than noodling. Keep at it." (Ron Block)

"Remember to enjoy the banjo journey" [Chris Quinn]

Aug 3, 2008 - 5:32:17 PM

447 posts since 12/24/2005

Add "Rose of Old Kentucky" to your A list.

Aug 3, 2008 - 7:15:39 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by ronjo843

Add "Rose of Old Kentucky" to your A list.





Ronnie - thanks for that suggestion - I have added that song - VERY nice song!

Thanks,
Phil

"Banjo isn''t that hard - just requires a lot of time and focused concentration, practicing rightly and with intent rather than noodling. Keep at it." (Ron Block)

"Remember to enjoy the banjo journey" [Chris Quinn]

Aug 4, 2008 - 5:55:29 PM

jcomfs

USA

189 posts since 2/25/2005

KEMO
SUNNY OSBORNE PLAYED THEM ON DETROIT TO WHEELING CD

Oct 5, 2008 - 4:12:52 AM

208 posts since 10/2/2008

This list is awesome! Top work mate, thanks!

Dec 19, 2008 - 1:28:50 AM

SandyR

USA

2173 posts since 10/23/2007

The chords to Charlie Monroe's "Old Kentucky Bound," if you know the basic melody, are:

I-V-I-V-I (verse)
IV-I-V-I-V-I (chorus)

Dec 19, 2008 - 5:40:02 AM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Rothman

The chords to Charlie Monroe's "Old Kentucky Bound," if you know the basic melody, are:

I-V-I-V-I (verse)
IV-I-V-I-V-I (chorus)





Sandy,

That is a neat song - I will add it to the chord lists.

Thanks for the idea!

Phil

"Listen, listen, listen and play, play, play." (Murphy Henry)

Jan 4, 2009 - 9:47:45 AM

JoeZ

USA

1823 posts since 9/25/2003

So when can we get that book, Richard?

(And does it come with a coupon for the "bacon bar"?)

"Someday I will play as well as my banjos sound." Joe Z

Jan 8, 2009 - 3:50:38 PM

6444 posts since 8/31/2004

This a wonderful resource Kemo Sabe. It's beautifully organized and I'm sure it will help people in their tune arrangements and for improvising breaks using standard chord progressions. It's always neat to quote from other tunes, even if it's just a passing lick or phrase. Well done, it's a great teaching aid! Thank you for making such a fine effort.

Happy pickin,

Tom Hanway

Please see my homepage and new digital stores.

''Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.'' - W. B. Yeats

Jan 8, 2009 - 9:22:02 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Tom Hanway

This a wonderful resource Kemo Sabe. It's beautifully organized and I'm sure it will help people in their tune arrangements and for improvising breaks using standard chord progressions. It's always neat to quote from other tunes, even if it's just a passing lick or phrase. Well done, it's a great teaching aid! Thank you for making such a fine effort.

Happy pickin,

Tom Hanway

Please see my homepage and new digital stores.

''Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.'' - W. B. Yeats



Tom,

Thank you for those kind words. I have used this thread as a work in progress learning tool for myself. I have had a lot of fun learning chord progressions, playing along with various songs and especially playing backup to many of these songs. I hope this effort has helped other folks.

Your comments are greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Phil
Katy, Tx

"Listen, listen, listen and play, play, play." (Murphy Henry)

Jan 9, 2009 - 10:17:03 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Dubz

This list is awesome! Top work mate, thanks!





Dubz - thanks for you comment. You are very kind!

Phil

"Listen, listen, listen and play, play, play." (Murphy Henry)

Jan 10, 2009 - 3:18:55 PM

3445 posts since 1/2/2004

I noticed that several posts ago in this subject Richard Dress spoke about a songbook he was writing. I hope it's not too off topic to ask Richard to talk about that project...

Lew

Jan 10, 2009 - 4:04:53 PM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Brooklynbanjoboy

I noticed that several posts ago in this subject Richard Dress spoke about a songbook he was writing. I hope it's not too off topic to ask Richard to talk about that project...

Lew





I have emailed Richard about the project ... I hope he might post here and update us.

Phil

"Listen, listen, listen and play, play, play." (Murphy Henry)

Jan 10, 2009 - 5:07:45 PM

KI4PRK

USA

1705 posts since 7/14/2008

How about one of my fav's: Crossing the Cumberlands.

1st section:
(in G minor) I-VII-I-IV-I-V-I-VII-I-IV-I-V-I
OR: Gm-F-Gm-Cm-Gm-D/Dm-Gm-F-Gm-Cm-Gm-D/Dm-Gm

2n section:
(again, in G minor): I-V-I-V-I
OR: Gm-D/Dm-Gm-D/Dm

73, Brennen

Jan 11, 2009 - 8:11:23 AM

1126 posts since 7/15/2003

quote:
Originally posted by KI4PRK

How about one of my fav's: Crossing the Cumberlands.

1st section:
(in G minor) I-VII-I-IV-I-V-I-VII-I-IV-I-V-I
OR: Gm-F-Gm-Cm-Gm-D/Dm-Gm-F-Gm-Cm-Gm-D/Dm-Gm

2n section:
(again, in G minor): I-V-I-V-I
OR: Gm-D/Dm-Gm-D/Dm

73, Brennen





Brennen,

That is a great song. It blows me away that at age 14 you are 'tuned in' to that song. I will post it in a few days..... first I gotta ...ahem, ahem,..uh...uh....get more familiar with it ..... .. and learn the chords ........

Thank you for opening my ears up to such a beautiful song!

Phil
Katy, Tx

"Listen, listen, listen and play, play, play." (Murphy Henry)

Feb 21, 2009 - 6:19:24 PM

rupedog

USA

12 posts since 12/4/2006

Thanks for the list.

Mar 2, 2009 - 4:18:50 AM

311 posts since 4/21/2008

what an awesome thread....I'm gonna save this

Doug

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