Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

222
Banjo Lovers Online


Each Day a Focus?

Posted by Northl on Friday, December 1, 2017

like this

Today I am focusing on hitting the string with the 10:00 position of my nail as suggested and keeping my wrist straighter. I realize that I am fighting my banjo by trying to hold it up too high so I've got to get used to reaching farther and looking at the neck when I do at a new position where it balances on my lap naturally. Looking at the camera shows my wrist more bent than is suggested. I wish I had looked sooner. If one is taking lessons a teacher would have pointed out all faults from the start. 

I think making a focus each day is a goal for me in my practice.

 

https://youtu.be/lRGXEqSFlDo



8 comments on “Each Day a Focus?”

WayneConrad Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @10:11:54 AM

Hitting the string with the 10:00 position of your nail, interesting! I've never read that, but it's what I do. I've always wondered if I'm doing it wrong. Does 10:00 come from the video you linked to, or from the banjo book you are using?

Northl Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @10:21:48 AM

The Dan Levenson book, and I have seen it other places as well. I attached a video clip of him playing too.

WayneConrad Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @10:56:30 AM

Thanks! Google gave me an excerpt of the book showing the page that recommends a 10:00 contact position for the striking nail. A few pages later in the excerpt, Dan recommends not tapping your foot. I've never been able to use my foot to keep rhythm, and I'm not convinced it actually helps most players. I know a bass player who is a foot tapper. Whenever his rhythm is off, so is his foot, but he keeps on tapping as though it helps. Now there are two things that Dan and I agree on. I think I like Dan. I'll have to add his book to my library.

Northl Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @11:22:44 AM

Ha ha ha, I am happy to be free of trying to make myself tap my foot too. Of course if you are off so is your foot!

AndyW Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @12:00:49 PM

I can't really help but tap my foot once I'm playing a bit faster and smoother.

I play with the banjo on my right thigh, and found playing over my neck scoop helped me focus on keeping my wrist straighter.

Boadicea Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @3:10:29 PM

It was really interesting to see the Clawhammer style of stroking in the video that you included @Northl. I hadn't really been able to get a clear idea of what was going on there. Are there different types of that stroke for different songs?

Boadicea Says:
Friday, December 1, 2017 @3:11:02 PM

It was really interesting to see the Clawhammer style of stroking in the video that you included @Northl. I hadn't really been able to get a clear idea of what was going on there. Are there different types of that stroke for different songs?

AndyW Says:
Saturday, December 2, 2017 @9:40:44 PM

Clawhammer as taught by Dan Levenson and most others has one basic stroke. A 'frail' with the fingernail(single note or brush more than one note), ending with the thumb resting on the 5th then sounding it as it lifts off. This is adapted so that the thumb lift is not necessarily sounded every time. Sometimes the thumb drops(called drop thumb) to sound a string other than the 5th. Occassionally the frail deliberately misses a string(m skip) but the thumb still ends in the same position.

Although I have only used the above method, I think a few teach differently, with the thumb hanging in the air when not being used, and so have two slightly different bum and ditty strokes, but the first method is I think more prevalent.

Outside right hand technique, the left hand does pretty much the same techniques as bluegrass, pull off's, hammer-ons, slides.

You must sign into your myHangout account before you can post comments.



More posts from Northl



Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

4.589844E-02