Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

341
Banjo Lovers Online


 All Forums
 Other Banjo-Related Topics
 Other Banjo-Related Topics
 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Decisions, Decisions


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/392766/2

Page: 1  2  3  

Brian Murphy - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:03:10


That's awesome, especially if you are Wayne Rogers or a GoldTone dealer. The top two picks were Twangers. That was a lot of fun.

CapoNFret - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:33:04


Banjo Choices: I'd choose the Stelling as no. 1, then the Gold Tone OB3 Twanger 1.

GrahamHawker - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:37:26


Looks like there will a shortage of crows around Pikeville soon.

Brian Murphy - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:37:26


Scoring. I looked at only people who clearly said a ranking. Some did not rank all five, but may have said x was first and y was second. I did not count the discussions about which recordings were good. I only included rankings of the banjos, including "ties."



First place: Banjo No. 1 (Twanger): 10 first place votes plus two ties for first. Also received two 3rd place votes.



Second place: Banjo No. 4 (Twanger): 3 first place votes and one tie for first place.



Third Place: Banjo No. 2 (Fender Artist). 12 second place votes and one 5th place vote.



Fourth Place: Banjo No. 5 (Gibson Granada). 1 first place vote and one tie for first place. One fifth place vote and one tie for fifth place.



Fifth Place: Banjo No. 3 (Stelling Sunflower). Two fourth place votes, one fifth place vote, and one tie for fifth.



To score totals, I did inverse scoring. Each first place vote = 5 pts, Second place = 4, third place = 3, fourth = 2, fifth = 1. Ties are 1/2 at the level (e.g. tied vote for 1st = 2.5). Based on that  method, here are the scores:



Twanger (Banjo 1) 61 points

Twanger (Banjo 4) 45 points

Fender Artist (Banjo 2) 13 points

Gibson Granada (Banjo 5) 9 points

Stelling Sunflower (Banjo 3) 5.5 points



With the exception of the last two banjos, the scoring represents an almost total inverse relationship between perception in sound and market price (the Granada finished fourth but is likely more expensive than the Sunflower).


Edited by - Brian Murphy on 09/14/2023 10:38:29

banjoez - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:49:25


Thanks for the great number crunching Brian!!



I don't know why more people didn't like the Stelling. In person it's a monster banjo. One of my personal favorites. Perhaps it simply overwhelmed the recording equipment or my mic placement was off.



Another thing this little exercise showed me is that although Gibson reissues were great in their day, other banjos have equaled or surpassed them IMHO and I've had a boatload of them through the years. Felt that way for a while now.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/14/2023 11:00:37

GrahamHawker - Posted - 09/14/2023:  10:56:22


I didn't put banjos 1-4 in any order as I did much like them. But if I had the Stelling would have been last, followed by the Fender and the Goldtone a bit better. While for me the Greg Rich Era Gibson Granada was streets ahead I'll probably stick with my Greg Rich Era Recording King.

Tractor1 - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:07:26


quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

Banjos have been revealed. See original post.



Now the question is, if I had revealed the banjos at the beginning would that have swayed your choices ? 



If any of you would like to talk to me about these results offline feel free to message me.  There are setup tricks that make a big difference.  






wonderful job Joe--I didn't vote--laptop speakers disqualify me--but if you lived next door I would try to help you test them all I could

NotABanjoYoda - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:08:43


While Im glad I got 2 banjos right....the Stelling invalidated the test imo. The recording setup couldnt pull out your winner.

Owen - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:13:48


banjoez: "Now the question is, if I had revealed the banjos at the beginning would that have swayed your choices ? "



For me, oh-nay eh-way. 



[Edit: I suppose it's a good thing that others are more preceptive/talented than I am.]


Edited by - Owen on 09/14/2023 11:16:55

banjoez - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:14:07


quote:

Originally posted by NotABanjoYoda

While Im glad I got 2 banjos right....the Stelling invalidated the test imo. The recording setup couldnt pull out your winner.






Invalidate? Not sure where you come up with that but you're entitled to your opinions of course. Stellings are a different breed of cat. They tend to be more aggressive on the surface compared with traditional mastertone style banjos that tend to come more from within. All banjos were recorded with the exact same setup. 


Edited by - banjoez on 09/14/2023 11:19:47

NotABanjoYoda - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:40:40


"I don't know why more people didn't like the Stelling. In person it's a monster banjo. One of my personal favorites. "

I was simply rephrasing the above statement. Recording 3 was, noisy, compressed. Recording 5 wasnt great. The other 3 sounded fine. Another setup might have brought out the Stelling as the monster not the loser. Using the same setup is good, but if it denegrated a couple banjos...namely a Stelling and Granada, then those would naturally sound the worst.

banjoez - Posted - 09/14/2023:  11:53:50


Well, I guess I simply don’t hear what some of you are hearing but then again I have the benefit of being the only one here in person. Still many of you were spot on. Great job guys!!



 


Edited by - banjoez on 09/14/2023 12:01:34

KCJones - Posted - 09/14/2023:  12:20:55


The Twanger is the clear winner in these rankings, and it's not even close. Hopefully with the Ome acquisition, they get someone that knows how to build necks so they can put a quality neck on that amazing pot assembly.

I do wonder about the Stelling. I think using a $40 USB microphone probably affected this, because frankly the recording quality on Banjo #3 is just terrible and I didn't even listen to it more than once because it really is bad. It makes me wonder if perhaps the Stelling was pushing beyond the pickup capabilities of that microphone. I owned a Stelling and it was the best sounding banjo I've ever heard, when you listened in person.

The position of the Granada reinforces my general opinion of Gibson Mastertone banjos, particularly the "Greg Rich Era". Marketing and Hype.

Honestly, I'll admit I really had difficulty hearing any real difference between them. Which is why my final verdict was "go with the best neck".

banjoez - Posted - 09/14/2023:  13:00:07


quote:

Originally posted by KCJones

The Twanger is the clear winner in these rankings, and it's not even close. Hopefully with the Ome acquisition, they get someone that knows how to build necks so they can put a quality neck on that amazing pot assembly.



I do wonder about the Stelling. I think using a $40 USB microphone probably affected this, because frankly the recording quality on Banjo #3 is just terrible and I didn't even listen to it more than once because it really is bad. It makes me wonder if perhaps the Stelling was pushing beyond the pickup capabilities of that microphone. I owned a Stelling and it was the best sounding banjo I've ever heard, when you listened in person.



The position of the Granada reinforces my general opinion of Gibson Mastertone banjos, particularly the "Greg Rich Era". Marketing and Hype.



Honestly, I'll admit I really had difficulty hearing any real difference between them. Which is why my final verdict was "go with the best neck".






Out of curiosity have you tried a 2022 or newer Twanger  and did you still find the neck clubby? The reason I ask is I had never touched a Gold Tone banjo until I got my hands on a batch of  2022 OB-3's with the Mastertone block and honestly find the necks to be really good. Very comfortable and not clubby at all and this is from a guy who likes Stellings and old Fenders with very compact necks. Perhaps the older necks were not that great. I wouldn't know.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/14/2023 13:15:36

NotABanjoYoda - Posted - 09/14/2023:  13:35:03


The Twanger has the best neck for my hands. Im guessing my D35, tele and SG geetars would be log poles to some, but love those necks too. My hands are larger than average but not big. I played a 1 11\16 nut speed neck (bigger than the Twanger) and thought it was perfect for me even though the wife couldnt play an F shape with it.

Hand size is real, relative and relevant. I could never play many thin tenor necks.

bosborne - Posted - 09/14/2023:  14:51:43


quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

After shopping around, these five banjos were the ones that stood out. Which one would you pick based on tonal characteristics. (And yes, these are five different banjos, not a trick question.)






The best is 3, easy. Most bass, and presence. Last is 5. Too metallic, dry. Though many people like that. The rest are somewhere in-between.

steve davis - Posted - 09/14/2023:  16:05:37


In my opinion each banjo needs its own set-up to bring out its best points.
Hard to decide long-distance and someone else's set-up and equipment.

banjomule - Posted - 09/14/2023:  19:13:05


Very cool thread! Thanks for taking the time to make the recordings and sharing!

Will Frady - Posted - 09/14/2023:  20:43:42


Joe thank you that was fun. Way to put the work in Brian Murphy, thanks. I have been wrong about the Gold tones apparently. I guess I’ll be shopping for a twanger , whilst eating a bucket of crow . I was very surprised with results. Thanks again.

25Mastertone - Posted - 09/15/2023:  05:26:09


This is cool and I agree that I also like how the recording of number 1 sounds. The banjo doesnt know what brand it is. Ive played a lot of crappy high end banjos. Also you can have 2 identical instruments and they both sound different. I hope your friend picks what they enjoyed most.

Leslie R - Posted - 09/15/2023:  08:54:03


I like 3 the best.
Though different, I like 5 close as second.
They all sound great.
Great picking as well.

phb - Posted - 09/15/2023:  09:27:24


Even now knowing the identity of the banjos I like the Stelling's sound the least. Too tinny and thin for my liking. Of course, I'd be open to change my mind when I hear the banjos in person.

davidppp - Posted - 09/15/2023:  09:35:34


Tony Ellis, who is one of the long list of banjo players who put up with Big Mon for a stint with the Bluegrass Boys, spent his subsequent music career -- most of his life, actually -- making what he called "new music that sounded old. His recorded work is some of the most lyrical resonator banjo music I know. He was a huge fan of Stelling banjos. (Go down the YouTube rabbit hole if you've never immersed yourself in his playing.)

Alex Z - Posted - 09/15/2023:  12:15:32


Amen.  Mr. Tony got beautiful tones out of the Stelling instruments, that fit the music he created.



I have 4 of his CDs and his book.  



Anyone who'd like to listen, I'd recommend the CD "Farewell My Home."  Here is the title track:  youtube.com/watch?v=TGVyJ-ow1g0


Edited by - Alex Z on 09/15/2023 12:28:14

GeeBeeThreefinger - Posted - 09/15/2023:  12:28:24


I chose #1 early on. A little surprised it was the Twanger. I have an OB-3 radiused Twanger, which I really enjoyed. It was crisp and clean. I sent it back to Gold Tone to swap the neck from the standard mahogany to the Bela neck because I thought I would enjoy the profile more, and it lost a lot of its clarity after the swap, IMHO. I put it aside for a couple of months (also have a GDL and a Bellflower, both walnut, that I play every day, and love how they sound).

After reading the results of this thread, last night I put back the original neck on my Twanger, and it pops and crackles again. Full disclosure, I did a little speed-neck treatment to the original neck, and thought that might change the tone for the worse, but it hasn’t. Oh, also exchanged the GT tone ring for a Deering-06, and that has really made it sweet.

Really enjoyed this thread!

banjoez - Posted - 09/15/2023:  20:02:12


quote:

Originally posted by GeeBeeThreefinger

I chose #1 early on. A little surprised it was the Twanger. I have an OB-3 radiused Twanger, which I really enjoyed. It was crisp and clean. I sent it back to Gold Tone to swap the neck from the standard mahogany to the Bela neck because I thought I would enjoy the profile more, and it lost a lot of its clarity after the swap, IMHO. I put it aside for a couple of months (also have a GDL and a Bellflower, both walnut, that I play every day, and love how they sound).



After reading the results of this thread, last night I put back the original neck on my Twanger, and it pops and crackles again. Full disclosure, I did a little speed-neck treatment to the original neck, and thought that might change the tone for the worse, but it hasn’t. Oh, also exchanged the GT tone ring for a Deering-06, and that has really made it sweet.



Really enjoyed this thread!






I'll let you Twanger owners in on a little secret I discovered. The neck position on the pot can make a big difference in the tone and volume of these banjos. Because they drill the lag bolt holes oversized in the rim you can move the necks around quite a bit up, down and sideways. Play around with the position and see what happens. Simply loosen the strings and the lag bolts, move it and then re-tighten everything. It dramatically helped several Twangers I've worked on including the two in this test. 


Edited by - banjoez on 09/15/2023 20:07:10

NotABanjoYoda - Posted - 09/15/2023:  21:13:50


It might be a chinese thing. My cheap Jamson was dead and had poor action until I figured that out.

My Twanger, however, sounded awesome with perfect action from the start. I do wish the frets were rounded at the end like my Mullins neck instead of tapered. Ill get those frets when I wear out these.

Tractor1 - Posted - 09/16/2023:  05:09:27


 




I'll let you Twanger owners in on a little secret I discovered. The neck position on the pot can make a big difference in the tone and volume of these banjos. Because they drill the lag bolt holes oversized in the rim you can move the necks around quite a bit up, down and sideways. Play around with the position and see what happens. Simply loosen the strings and the lag bolts, move it and then re-tighten everything. It dramatically helped several Twangers I've worked on including the two in this test. 






up as  in a raising the action way or down-Joe--I am always wanting a bit more clearance at the junction and wondered about doing that--thanks

banjoez - Posted - 09/16/2023:  05:19:45


quote:

Originally posted by Tractor1

 




I'll let you Twanger owners in on a little secret I discovered. The neck position on the pot can make a big difference in the tone and volume of these banjos. Because they drill the lag bolt holes oversized in the rim you can move the necks around quite a bit up, down and sideways. Play around with the position and see what happens. Simply loosen the strings and the lag bolts, move it and then re-tighten everything. It dramatically helped several Twangers I've worked on including the two in this test. 






up as  in a raising the action way or down-Joe--I am always wanting a bit more clearance at the junction and wondered about doing that--thanks






It can work for either scenario depending how much wiggle room any particular banjo may have but yes, you can move up to reduce action ar down to increase action as well as side to side to fine tune the center line. Again it depends on the individual banjo and how accurate the lag hole was drilled in the rim. Also don't be shy about adjusting the truss rod which is another area that can affect tone and volume and the action. Most of the Twangers I've worked on didn't have enough relief in the neck. Turn counter-clockwise - increase action and relief. Turn clockwise - reduce action and relief. Don't force it either way and small adjustments at a time. It can dramatically affect the volume and playability on some banjos.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/16/2023 05:26:07

Tractor1 - Posted - 09/16/2023:  05:24:55


thanks Joe--I build my own from parts as needed and have the truss rod and action under control--but always wondered about raising the neck above the pot a bit more than usual--but thought it might be detremental

banjoez - Posted - 09/16/2023:  05:34:36


quote:

Originally posted by Tractor1

thanks Joe--I build my own from parts as needed and have the truss rod and action under control--but always wondered about raising the neck above the pot a bit more than usual--but thought it might be detremental






There is no right or wrong way in my opinion. It's what works best for the particular banjo and situation.  Some guys swear that the top of the fingerboard should always be even or just a hair above the top of the head/tone ring. That may have nicer aesthetics but I've seen great sounding banjos with that fitment all over the place.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/16/2023 05:36:24

steve davis - Posted - 09/16/2023:  07:11:03


Alan Munde's Banjo Sandwich shows off Stelling's good tone along with Paul Silvius with Del.

airport-security - Posted - 09/16/2023:  08:37:39


Trial ordering maybe was a factor. It’s hard not to compare everything to number 1, the GT, and the one that sounds closest (the other GT) ends up ranked second. Trial design is hard! Best would have been an order randomized for each participant. Exhausting to implement, though, so I’m not actually criticizing the process.

But mostly I just wanted the Stelling to win, so….

GeeBeeThreefinger - Posted - 09/16/2023:  10:42:26


quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

 


I'll let you Twanger owners in on a little secret I discovered. The neck position on the pot can make a big difference in the tone and volume of these banjos. Because they drill the lag bolt holes oversized in the rim you can move the necks around quite a bit up, down and sideways. Play around with the position and see what happens. Simply loosen the strings and the lag bolts, move it and then re-tighten everything. It dramatically helped several Twangers I've worked on including the two in this test. 






Thats certainly helpful to know @banjoez. You can see the top(?) hole is reamed with a ton of room. I replaced the neck and really took my time with it, making sure it was matched up tight to the pot. I was disappointed with how it came back from GT- the action was so high that I put a 1/2" bridge on it, and as mentioned the tone was dead. But the old neck is perfect. Maybe down the road I will try the Bela neck again, if I don't sell it. 

 



Really, for the price the OB-3 Twanger (radiused) is exceptional, though I modded mine a little. I have a 5/8" Bone Valley bridge on it, and upgraded the tailpiece to a Prucha clamshell, also upgraded the tuners to Rickards. And the fore mentioned replacement tone ring to a Deering-06. 

steve davis - Posted - 09/16/2023:  11:39:47


quote:

Originally posted by GeeBeeThreefinger

quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

 


I'll let you Twanger owners in on a little secret I discovered. The neck position on the pot can make a big difference in the tone and volume of these banjos. Because they drill the lag bolt holes oversized in the rim you can move the necks around quite a bit up, down and sideways. Play around with the position and see what happens. Simply loosen the strings and the lag bolts, move it and then re-tighten everything. It dramatically helped several Twangers I've worked on including the two in this test. 






Thats certainly helpful to know @banjoez. You can see the top(?) hole is reamed with a ton of room. I replaced the neck and really took my time with it, making sure it was matched up tight to the pot. I was disappointed with how it came back from GT- the action was so high that I put a 1/2" bridge on it, and as mentioned the tone was dead. But the old neck is perfect. Maybe down the road I will try the Bela neck again, if I don't sell it. 

 



Really, for the price the OB-3 Twanger (radiused) is exceptional, though I modded mine a little. I have a 5/8" Bone Valley bridge on it, and upgraded the tailpiece to a Prucha clamshell, also upgraded the tuners to Rickards. And the fore mentioned replacement tone ring to a Deering-06. 






How much did you have invested after all those changes?

GeeBeeThreefinger - Posted - 09/16/2023:  12:58:09


Hey steve davis, about 2300 total for banjo, tuners, tail and tone ring. The tone ring was almost a straight swap, price wise. I’d sold the original ring, and found a used Deering-06 for cheap.

Adding in for the neck & fitting though boosts it up close to the price of the GT Bela.

Mostly I wanted to see what my modifying would do. Though the neck was an expensive lesson.

BUBBY - Posted - 09/19/2023:  08:50:26


Great test. Thanks for sharing.

Leslie R - Posted - 09/19/2023:  10:13:42


Gotta admit, I was a bit impressed the 2 twangers sounded as good as they did:
I still like the Stelling the best.
Just curious, for the individual who will be making the decision, did you ever get a chance to try a prewar tube and plate Gibson.
Currently they don’t command the price that a one piece flange Gibson does, but still, they are phenomenal banjos.

banjoez - Posted - 09/20/2023:  06:04:35


quote:

Originally posted by Leslie R

Gotta admit, I was a bit impressed the 2 twangers sounded as good as they did:

I still like the Stelling the best.

Just curious, for the individual who will be making the decision, did you ever get a chance to try a prewar tube and plate Gibson.

Currently they don’t command the price that a one piece flange Gibson does, but still, they are phenomenal banjos.






Great question! I owned an original Prewar TB-5 high profile full weight flathead (yes, pretty rare bear) 2 pc flange banjo. It sounded great. Also had several Prewar archtop tube and plate Gibsons and they were good but lost something up the neck compared to a flathead. Just my opinion.



I'm thinking a PB-6 with either an early low profile or high profile lightweight flathead ring would be a perfect combination.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/20/2023 06:08:29

KCJones - Posted - 09/20/2023:  06:33:30


banjoez I did have a chance to play an OB-3 but only held it for 5-10 minutes, assuming that it had the same neck as most other GTs. Perhaps it's time for me to revisit the shop and give it another try.

Tractor1 - Posted - 09/20/2023:  07:16:01


quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

quote:

Originally posted by Tractor1

thanks Joe--I build my own from parts as needed and have the truss rod and action under control--but always wondered about raising the neck above the pot a bit more than usual--but thought it might be detremental






There is no right or wrong way in my opinion. It's what works best for the particular banjo and situation.  Some guys swear that the top of the fingerboard should always be even or just a hair above the top of the head/tone ring. That may have nicer aesthetics but I've seen great sounding banjos with that fitment all over the place.






I took your word and slotted the lag holes-and got almost an eighth in height on my two fives --I wished I had did that years ago--I play a lot closer to that joint than many --thanks--never hurt the banjo sound a bit

ObsidianSpike - Posted - 09/20/2023:  07:58:13


Late to the fun part but I'm surprised the Stelling recording was received so poorly. It was my favorite by a hair, it just seemed to have the slightest bit more texture to its tone. The Gold Tone and Granada were tied for me in 2nd (they sounded pretty much the same), and the Artist sounded a bit dull.

Preconceived notions:
-Stelling makes a wonderful banjo I will never be able to afford
-Gold Tone is highly underrated and I'm a big fan (I own one of their Tubaphone open backs)
-Gibson is a bit overrated (blame it on the ignorance of youth), doubted their 90s banjos were much more than a name
-Fender... people say the Artists were good!

In the end I don't think my opinions were upset too much (so I probably was swayed somewhat by knowing what each was), but I'm surprised my most positive brand bias tied with my negative brand bias.

banjoez - Posted - 09/20/2023:  12:20:01


Yeah, I don't get why the Stelling recording was so negatively received either. Honestly, it certainly was the most powerful of the banjos tested in person and perhaps the recording seemed a bit over driven. When I listen on my speakers it sounds great. Perhaps my 66 year old ears are simply not detecting things that others hear. A good Pass rim Stelling set up well is still something to behold in person. Like an old flathead on steroids. It took me years and lots of messing around with them to find the sweet spot. I am also a firm believer that the Tony Pass rim was a game changer for Stelling.  Had multiples of both through the years and though the pre-Pass ones are very powerful the post-Pass ones have the depth and warmth that an old Gibson guy like me could really appreciate. Best of both worlds IMHO. 



Gosh I wish someone with the right skills would buy the rights to make them again. I'm glad Geoff got to retire and he deserves it but his banjos are truly something special that will be sorely missed. Just about anyone can build a Masterclone as good or better than Gibson but there was only one Stelling. 


Edited by - banjoez on 09/20/2023 12:35:32

NotABanjoYoda - Posted - 09/20/2023:  13:47:11


So the comments about how good the stelling was when I heard nothing but a poor recording bothered me...and my ears arent even 40 yet. I was listening with the bho playback (jukebox or whatever its called) on my tablet with really expensive headphones.

So i took the time to download the files on my pc and listen to them on Win 11 mpeg player and "son of a b", track 3 and 5 sounded fine. restoring my faith in Stelling. All 7 Stellings I played in person sounded better than the 3 Twangers I have played (to me).

Why the bho jukebox consistently doesnt play 3 and 5 correct through my tablet, who knows (plays 1 2 4 fine) They sound fine on my tablet using the musicplayer app. Im just gonna not trust the built in bho player anymore and move on. Maybe this is why track 3 isnt doing well with others?

steve davis - Posted - 09/20/2023:  18:57:03


quote:

Originally posted by Leslie R

Gotta admit, I was a bit impressed the 2 twangers sounded as good as they did:

I still like the Stelling the best.

Just curious, for the individual who will be making the decision, did you ever get a chance to try a prewar tube and plate Gibson.

Currently they don’t command the price that a one piece flange Gibson does, but still, they are phenomenal banjos.






I changed my tube and plate '76 Gold Star wreath archtop (plywood rim) to a StewMac 3 ply tube and plate rim and one of their no-hole flathead rings.



Selling that is my worst banjo regret.

KCJones - Posted - 09/21/2023:  07:52:25


Every Stelling I've ever played has sounded better than any Gibson. I completely disqualified the Stelling in this test because I couldn't get past the "noise" in the recording. Not sure where the noise came from, but it's still there when I listen to it today. I think a lot of people did the same thing, the recording/playback quality caused issues and so they ranked it lowest.



I'm a bit biased towards Stellings, so part of me wants to say that the microphone probably just couldn't handle the dynamic range of a Stelling and that's why the recording is clipping and noisy.


Edited by - KCJones on 09/21/2023 07:52:50

banjoez - Posted - 09/21/2023:  08:14:30


Looking visually at the Audacity files of each, the Stelling was definitely hitting the highest peaks and the fattest mids. Not much clipping going on but there are a few. Perhaps that's what you're hearing. Again, each banjo was recorded in the same way in the same room with the same equipment at the same distance from a Blu Snowball Mic. I don't claim to be a recording expert that's for sure and this comparison was never meant to be a scientific analysis of anything.  I went this route instead of a highly compressed MP4 video because I felt it gave a truer audio representation.


Edited by - banjoez on 09/21/2023 08:18:06

steve davis - Posted - 09/21/2023:  15:02:25


I believe you'll get differing results every time a new set of recordings are made.

banjoak - Posted - 09/21/2023:  21:56:02


quote:

Originally posted by banjoez

Looking visually at the Audacity files of each, the Stelling was definitely hitting the highest peaks and the fattest mids. Not much clipping going on but there are a few. Perhaps that's what you're hearing. Again, each banjo was recorded in the same way in the same room with the same equipment at the same distance from a Blu Snowball Mic. I don't claim to be a recording expert that's for sure and this comparison was never meant to be a scientific analysis of anything.  I went this route instead of a highly compressed MP4 video because I felt it gave a truer audio representation.






It's not so much about being recording expert, or scientific analysis... but missing a lot of aspects in why you aren't really making a true representation evaluation. FWIW, mention of visual, can be a bit deceiving; and highest peaks is not necessarily a good thing.



First to mention, the files you uploaded onto BHO, what others are listening to, are in mp3 lossy format. It is not truer representation than the audio of mp4 (m4a). Most likely no difference, though mp4 could possibly be better, as it offers some options with better AAC codecs, or even ALAC lossless format, and higher bitrate. 



That aside, (even if wave) that's not the biggest issue of why still not really evaluating any true representation of just the banjos; or true differences. Rather it's simply evaluating how each banjo works within set context, recording chain, equipment, set-up, conditions.... both on input and output sides.... to which are not flat, neutral or linear; but will color and favor or hype various differences over others. These can vastly overwhelm any evaluation.



On input side; recording setup and chain. The mic, the mic placement/distance angle, and the room, dimensions, reflection/diffusion, phasing; room modes, and where source and mic are in room. 



Equally, if not more important, is the output side; what people are listening/monitoring on varies greatly; and definitely affects the experience; Various laptop, phone, car, earbuds, good headphones, average home stereo, to expensive home stereo, or if to accurate studio mixing monitors. Even in those categories, lots of variance. As well as  speakers, amp, headroom, might be some default software on computer playback devices; esp phones and laptops... that altering EQ, compressor/limiter; and for actual speakers, as above, the room, dimensions, modes, where in the room (speaker and listener) play a part. These can all give greatly different listening experience, esp given file probably hasn't really had mastering consideration.



I don't know why more people didn't like the Stelling. In person it's a monster banjo.



Which illustrates the issue of trying to make true evaluation. BTW, did you do similar blind test listen to uploaded BHO mp3 files on a phone? Laptop/tablet? Compare to a better sytem, or maybe car? To me the Stelling and Granada both sounded overwhelmed on phone, (perhaps too much mid information going on?); Conversely where the Gold Tones sounded a bit lacking on better system. 

Brian Murphy - Posted - 09/22/2023:  06:57:09


Most music today is heard through computer speakers and ear buds/air pods. In large live settings, I would challenge anyone to seriously tell me what banjo someone is playing after the sound is fed through a pickup, through a wireless signal, through the effects pedal, through a board, and out to the speakers that may or may not be mixed well and into a setting that may or may not be optimal for acoustics. The point is that the banjo that sounds best through the technology most used today might be the best sounding banjo for today. Some banjos that in a quiet room might sound best to us might not do the best going through the software and hardware most people use.

Page: 1  2  3  

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Privacy Consent
Copyright 2024 Banjo Hangout. All Rights Reserved.





Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.046875