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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: The Mystery of the Most Valuable Banjo in the World...


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/363041

Page: 1  2  

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/12/2020:  15:05:19


So which banjo is this?



The one that John Lennon first learned to play on... taught by his mother, Julia.



So where is it now?



Find out more on April 17th...



lennonsbanjo.com/

rcc56 - Posted - 04/12/2020:  16:35:59


"The stuff that dreams are made of . . ."



There are no known pictures of Lennon with his mother Julia's banjo.



John's half sister Julia Baird remembers it was a "mother of pearl backed banjo." Most likely it would have been pearloid celluloid plastic rather than real mother of pearl. And that John's grandfather " . . . had brought it back from a sea trip," or in other words, it might have been US made.



That's all we know. We don't know whether it was a tenor, plectrum, 5 string, or anything else; unless Paul, Yoko, or Julian remembers seeing the banjo. I wonder if anyone has asked any of them.



So, it might have been anything from a Slingerland made tenor to perhaps a Vegavox. Maybe it still exists, maybe it doesn't, but how would you identify it? Maybe it went through the classifieds, maybe it ended up in Yoko's or Paul's hands, or maybe Julian or Dhani Harrison has it, or maybe it went into the dumpster.



Watching the circus that could ensue from this subject might be pretty interesting.



If I remember, I might watch the play while it's showing on youtube from the 17th to the 21st.  It might be fun, especially since life is trying to take on a rather boring sameness with the current sheltering conditions.  Thanks for the heads-up on this.



For those who remember my opening line, perhaps tonight is a good night to watch "The Maltese Falcon."


Edited by - rcc56 on 04/12/2020 16:48:27

rcc56 - Posted - 04/12/2020:  17:00:51


Here's a nice game to occupy the collective knowledge of hangout members:

Post the names of all of the various old banjo models that had pearloid or "mother of pearl" backs.

I'll start with these:

Bacon and Day Senorita.
Ludwig Silver Flash.
Early Gibson TB-5.



Tag.


Edited by - rcc56 on 04/12/2020 17:06:55

Culloden - Posted - 04/12/2020:  17:42:22


Kel Kroyden style 10
Gibson style 11
Stromberg-Voisinet tenor( I have only seen one with a MOTS back and pictures of one other)


Tag.

Alvin Conder - Posted - 04/12/2020:  19:05:26


Maybell Recording Songster for one. You could get them in white, bright green, and the color that I have, Bathroom Pink.

tdennis - Posted - 04/12/2020:  19:53:39


Harmony tenor "Supertone" (from 1920-30's)



Vega "Soloist" tenor.


Edited by - tdennis on 04/12/2020 19:57:26

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 04/12/2020:  20:09:17


This is a stage play, meaning it's likely full of conjecture, dramatization of facts which may or may not be factual, and probably some out-and-out falsehoods. To again quote "The Maltese Falcon, " It's lead!"

The play might be interesting, it might be dull as a worn out pencil. I think I'd rather watch "The Search for George Washington's Cherry Tree Axe," a program probably just as truthful.

dutchtenor - Posted - 04/13/2020:  00:59:13


Several Leedys (Egyptian, Hollander, Olympian). But those were not ‘mother of pearl backed’ banjo’s, but ‘mother of pearl artworks’ (wether you like ‘m or not).
Perhaps more like the Leedy Collegian.
Nice topic btw ;-)

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/13/2020:  05:55:15


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_Lennon



According to this Wikipedia article, both of John’s parents, Alfred “Fred” Lennon and Julia Stanley Lennon, played the banjo and sang. The two met in 1927 but did not marry until 1938.



According to the article, Julia Lennon also played ukulele and accordion.



This leads me to speculate that



A) Julia probably used ukulele tuning on her banjo



B) her banjo was probably a four-string model, not a five...



Additionally, Julia’s father was retired from the Merchant Navy, so he may have purchased the banjo while on a stopover in the US.



Or alternately, Fred Lennon, who was also a merchant seaman, may have bought the banjo as a gift for Julia while on a stopover in the US.



But the banjo could well have been make in the UK, as there were plenty of manufacturers there, too, including Essex, Cammemeyer, Temlett, Weaver, Wilmshurst and Windsor...



banjoworld.de/English.htm



The fact that apparently nobody in the family ever called the instrument by a brand name (like "Julia's Gibson" or "Julia's Vega") leads me to speculate that it was probably a fairly low-end model and may not have even had a maker's name on the headstock...



 


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/13/2020 06:07:58

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/13/2020:  08:20:38


BTW, "mother of pearl backed banjo"... this clue could mean different things, couldn't it...?

A banjo with lots of MOP inlay on its resonator...?

A resonator-less banjo with some MOP inlay on the heel and/or the back of the peghead?

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/14/2020:  09:40:43


Further thoughts on Julia/John’s banjo...

One of John Lennon’s most acclaimed songs is the 1965 “In My Life”.

This song bears John’s harmonic “fingerprints” via the use of one of his favourite chord devices, the “minor subdominant”. In the key of C, the subdominant minor chord would be F minor.

I believe that John learned this harmonic device from his mother Julia as she taught the young beginner to play one of her favourite tunes on the banjo, “Little White Lies”.

(According to Beatles expert Mark Lewisohn, Julia taught John how to play “Little White Lies” on banjo: tinyurl.com/zzyx8q6)

According to an interview with McCartney (link is behind a paywall, alas) a teenage John Lennon revealed to him that “Little White Lies” was a particular favourite of his.

I believe that this has some significance if one is willing to accept my unprovable thesis that “In My Life” was written either consciously or unconsciously about his mother Julia Lennon.

“But of all these friends and lovers, there is no one compares with you…”

Who could that “you” possibly be?

In 1965, when the song was written, Lennon had not yet met Yoko Ono, but by all accounts, his marriage to Cynthia Powell Lennon was not exactly a passionate love affair...

Thus I believe there were only two other people Lennon might have had in mind as “you”: either his bandmate, Paul McCartney, or his mother, Julia Lennon.

We know from subsequent history that Lennon’s feelings about McCartney were... let’s just say “complicated”.

But we also know that Lennon had an idealized, idolized version of his mother, whose tragic death devastated him as a teenager. One author has called Julia “John’s lifelong muse”.

John went on to write several other songs about her, including “Mother” and “Julia”.

But “In My Life” seems to me to be best one for showing the musical influence of Julia and her banjo!

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/14/2020:  13:37:56


And probably Julia taught John this one, too... "Ain't She Sweet"...

youtube.com/watch?v=rtJzT59WRVY

stevo58 - Posted - 04/15/2020:  00:10:53


It was certainly a four -string. When one of Lennon’s very early guitars was found in an attic room (this is all from memory now, since I can’t get to my copy of “Beatle’s Gear,” where it is all documented -they found string packs with notations about string gauges for tuning the guitar. Four string. Also, given the time period, nothing else makes sense.

Lewisohn’s book (which is fascinating) also mentions that someone (can’t remember who,sorry) watched John’s chording in the Quarrymen, and said not only was he using banjo chords, they were actually ‘incorrect’ banjo chords, but John got touchy if you claimed his mother showed him anything wrong.

Liverpool was the main port for transatlantic shipments. With all the sailors, it could have been a US banjo sold by one who didn’t want it anymore. I’ll bet a low-end US banjo picked up (possibly used) in a US port would have been cheaper than a UK-made banjo.

Speculation.

Steven

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/15/2020:  10:36:18


Thanks, Steven.

Speculation.. can be fun... especially for those of us who love 'the three B's'...

Banjos.... Beatles... and Bulls***ting...

stevo58 - Posted - 04/15/2020:  10:44:11


I was able to look at the Gear book. The tuning was standard plectrum (CGBD) with the 5th tuned to G and the sixth left off or loose and flapping.

And it was Paul’s dad hi made the comments about the banjo chords.

I attached photos from the book. Another must have for us freaks.

Steven





 

spoonfed - Posted - 04/15/2020:  10:49:11


Paul is on record as saying that John played his guitar with five strings and, left the sixth hanging loose suggesting that he was used to playing five not four strings, Jim McCartney (Pauls dad) was a band leader in the twenties and thirties and it was he who said John was not even playing proper banjo chords, Paul wrote the tune to In My Life, it was a poem John had written and is thought to be partly autobiographical and, about Stuart Sutcliffe.

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/15/2020:  12:51:30


Thanks, Nick!



Any chance you could re-scan that page above, the one on the right? Interesting....



I hate to quibble with Paul McCartney's memory, but...



...anyone who has ever played the five string banjo knows that the fifth string is almost invariably played as an open G string, and rarely--- bordering on never--- used for playing chords.



And this would be especially the case for a beginner, like John Lennon would've been back then. Probably the chords he was playing were very basic first position chords (ie, frets 0 to 3) which is not far up the neck enough for the player's hand to even reach the fifth string, because that one doesn't start until the fifth fret.



So even assuming that John had transferred his chords from five-string banjo to guitar, those banjo chords probably would've pretty much have to have been played on four strings, not five....



Re: the package of strings.... a lot of folks that play plectrum banjo, like me for example, often are sometimes forced to buy five-string sets and then just use four of the strings. Because most small music stores offer banjo strings in two flavours: five-string and tenor, because the demand for sets of plectrum banjo strings is not exactly overwhelming...



Plus, whose handwriting is that on the package? We don't know. Could easily have been somebody who worked at the music store trying to explain to the purchaser (John? Julia?) exactly what notes the five strings in the package were, so that the purchaser could choose the right four strings to use on a four string banjo...?



But I do like your suggestion about Stuart Sutcliffe, I'd never thought of that one...



Cheers,



Will





 

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  07:03:44


Here's an interesting photo I found. 'beatles' is already on the kick, so this is post-Julia's-death, but it looks like a plectrum to me. No idea if this is 'the' banjo, but it indicates we are talking about a plectrum.



 



 



 


Edited by - stevo58 on 04/16/2020 07:17:18



 

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  07:59:27


Wow, great find! An actual picture of the banjo!



Thanks for sharing! I can’t imagine it being any other banjo except the Julia/John banjo... just like that must be Paul’s own trumpet, because where else could it have come from?



As for the date of that photo....we see Paul with his Beatle haircut instead of his Elvis pompadour... according to this article, the big changeover happened in October, 1961,



neatorama.com/2012/01/26/the-o...-haircut/



So the photo must be circa 1961 or 1962... which definitely discredits the theory that John destroyed or disposed of the banjo in his grief over Julia’s death in 1958.



That sure looks to be a good quality plectrum banjo with a resonator... and look at that quality molded banjo case behind Paul... that probably wouldn’t have been the case housing an El Cheapo banjo...



So now is the time for all our BHO experts to look at that grainy old photo and figure out what model it might be.



A delicious quarantine-time mystery for all our armchair banjo detectives to solve...



Will


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 08:01:10

Joel Hooks - Posted - 04/16/2020:  08:07:33


While I think this whole thing is silly because Lennon was not a "banjoist", why do people think he would be playing an American made banjo?

There are TONS of English built banjos, many (like zither banjos) are dogs, but much of them are very fine banjos. CE made banjos in particular are very good.

The photo of the book shows an issue of the BMG magazine. That magazine (published by CE) continued the tradition of fingerstyle "classic banjo" all the way to the 1970s. While various "folk" styles started to be discussed post WW2, with few exceptions (of "bluegrass" arrangements) they were still publishing standard finger style banjo solos intended to be played in gut/silk/rayon/nylon strings or zither banjos.

They also published solos and ran articles on plectrum banjo, tenor banjo, plectrum guitar, Spanish guitar, Hawaiian guitar, and mandolin.

It would be safe to assume that Lennon was exposed (at least briefly) to the BMG clubs and the classic banjo repertoire as well as all of the other family of "kindred" instruments. Most likely he would have been playing pick style on a 4 string banjo or tenor banjo.

There is no reason to presume he was playing an American banjo.

Joel Hooks - Posted - 04/16/2020:  08:10:36


quote:

Originally posted by stevo58

Here's an interesting photo I found. 'beatles' is already on the kick, so this is post-Julia's-death, but it looks like a plectrum to me. No idea if this is 'the' banjo, but it indicates we are talking about a plectrum.



 



 



 






Inlay pattern looks like a Windsor.   The Windsor factory was destroyed during WW2. 



 

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:06:57


Good point, hadn’t thought about the hair. I have a suspicion this was taken at Paul’s dad’s house, so it would be Mike’s cheap drum kit (and explain the logo taped on - not a gigging kit), Jim’s NEMS piano, and Paul’s trumpet. The arch top doesn't look like Paul's Hofner Senator to me, though.



 



And I agree, it is silly, but so what? No harm done. 


Edited by - stevo58 on 04/16/2020 09:14:29

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:22:44


Could this be the same archtop?

pinterest.ca/pin/251427591682170337/

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:34:10


Joel, thank you for that contribution which tentatively identifies it as a Windsor.



I suspect you are probably correct, as Windsor seems to have been one if the best-selling brands, but WTH, let’s just put it out there..



Do any of you collectors have old Windsor catalogs circa 1900-1950 that you could share?



Or perhaps some intrepid internet detective can find one online?



Thanks,



Will


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 09:34:50

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:38:01


Looks like it. Beatles Gear says it is a Zenith Model 17. According to the book, he traded his trumpet for it.



The classical is probably a Framus 5/1. 

 



Windsor with same inlay:



 



img.auctiva.com/imgdata/1/3/5/...53_tp.jpg


Edited by - stevo58 on 04/16/2020 09:43:26

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:43:08


There’s a banjo fanatic named Guenter Amendt in Germany.. host of “Banjoworld” website... anybody know him?



If so, could you please put him onto this thread?



Thanks!



Will


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 09:44:42

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  09:54:28


I think it’s a ‘Premier’ model. Gunter doesn’t have one like this in his collection, though he has other Windsors.

rcc56 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  10:01:40


Here is a modern picture of Paul playing banjo, probably taken sometime while Paul was in his 50's. It appears to be similar to the banjo in Steve's picture.



liverpoolbeatlescene.com/image...banjo.jpg



Taking this into account, I will suggest that the banjo in Steve's picture belonged to the McCartney family and was not John's banjo at all, and that Paul may still own it.

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  10:05:57


Agreed. So close. Paul seems to be the only one who kept all his instruments.

spoonfed - Posted - 04/16/2020:  10:26:28


I believe that the earlier photo of Paul with banjo and trumpet was taken at Mona Bests club the Casbah after the bands first trip to Hamburg, why ? Because the Casbah was decorated with musical instruments of different types and , anyway Paul had long since parted company with his trumpet, trading it for his first guitar !

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 04/16/2020:  10:40:15


Finding John Lennon's banjo shouldn't be all tyhat difficult.

It will show up on eBay at least seven or eight times, complete with authentic autographs and other genuine Lennon memorabilia. I'm frankly surprised we haven't seen these listings yet.

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:08:08


I’d be happy to pay as much as £200for it.

Meestro - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:19:01


quote:

Originally posted by rcc56

Here's a nice game to occupy the collective knowledge of hangout members:



Post the names of all of the various old banjo models that had pearloid or "mother of pearl" backs.



I'll start with these:



Bacon and Day Senorita.

Ludwig Silver Flash.

Early Gibson TB-5.







Tag.






 

Meestro - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:24:01


quote:

Originally posted by dutchtenor

Several Leedys (Egyptian, Hollander, Olympian). But those were not ‘mother of pearl backed’ banjo’s, but ‘mother of pearl artworks’ (wether you like ‘m or not).

Perhaps more like the Leedy Collegian.

Nice topic btw ;-)






My 1928 Leedy Solotone C has the perilous on back of the Fatman's Resonator. And sad to say that resonator fits my stomach perfectly at this point in my life!

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:25:21


I’m going to go out a limb here and say with absolutely no evidence that that banjo Paul is playing is the Lennon banjo.



Occam’s razor dictates that the simplest explanation is the most likely one.



And what is more likely than a sentimental guy like our Paul, who would keep all his childhood instruments, would also keep John’s banjo if he had it in his possession?



And what evidence is there that Paul McCartney ever owned or played a banjo? Zero.



However, young Mr. McCartney was known to be a pretty serious student of piano, guitar and drums, before turning his hand to the bass guitar at which he became a master.



However, we cant rule out this possibility so if anybody reading this has any idea how to ask Paul about the provenance of that banjo... please, Paul, settle this banjo mystery for us...



 



Will


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 11:30:41

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:34:11


I doubt that Paul ended up with it. I think this is as was said earlier, a. McCartney family photo.

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  11:48:15


Ooh! Stevo, our most fervent banjo detective disagrees!

Controversy swirls at BHO...

Time for angry partisanship and Russian trolls!

Stevo, I got Andrew Jackson here sayin’ I’m right about this one...

...even though my wife will attest that I am very rarely right about anything...

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  12:44:50


Will, I’m not putting any money in this.  Jackson hated paper money anyway; I don't understand why he's on a bill. 


Edited by - stevo58 on 04/16/2020 12:45:52

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  12:45:27


Stevo, I was just kidding about the bet. But here's another reason for my opinion...



I don’t know about England, but in the US’s golden age of four-string banjos, it is estimated that for every plectrum banjo manufactured, there were about ten tenors made.



So what are the odds that both Lennon and McCartney would own plectrum banjos... of the same “Windsor” brand?


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 12:49:14

stevo58 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  13:08:54


I know, Will, I'm just having fun. If we can't jerk each other's chain a bit what good are we?

This feeling of being oh so close but not quite is maddening.

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  13:19:16


Oopsie! Just realized I engaged in bit of pretzel logic last posting...

I should’ve just said “two plectrum banjos” without conflating the “McCartney” Windsor brand plectrum banjo with a possible second “Lennon” banjo, which may or may not have been a plectrum banjo, and may or may not have been a Windsor banjo...

...another attempted leap of logic foiled by my own shoelaces...

...sorry...

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 04/16/2020:  14:42:57


"And what evidence is there that Paul McCartney ever owned or played a banjo? Zero."

Well if he never played one, I wonder where the photo in that link posted by Bob Chuckrow came from?

That does appear to be McCartney playing a banjo, which I also notice is strung lefthanded so that a lefty such as McCartney can play it easily.

Harro - Posted - 04/16/2020:  14:53:34


Why not ask Paul about the banjo, someone must be able to contact him. That would end all the conjecture.

Joel Hooks - Posted - 04/16/2020:  15:06:53


That Windsor is a regular (not reversed) 5 string with a tunneled 5th on the bottom (as he is playing it upside down or reverse).

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  16:44:48


OK, Harro, I just sent a message to Paul via his agents, Marshall Arts.

We can hope that both Messrs. Marshall and McCartney have a lot of extra time on their hands due to the pandemic and might even answer our burning question...

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  16:57:18


Mr Porgie, you had a good point about the more recent picture... I didnt explain it very clearly, but I was actually talking about whether Paul was ever known to have played the banjo back in the 50’s/60’s.



I still don’t believe there is any evidence of that.



But the very idea of Lennon and McCartney each owning their own banjo brings a smile... and begs the musical question...



...what if the Quarrymen had become a banjo band?


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 16:57:44

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 04/16/2020:  18:13:16


quote:

Originally posted by Joel Hooks

That Windsor is a regular (not reversed) 5 string with a tunneled 5th on the bottom (as he is playing it upside down or reverse).






While I agree that the banjo in the picture is a 5-string with a tunneled fifth on the bottom, it still appears to me that the strings (the ones that can actually be seen) are strung for a left handed player. The way it is held, the largest strings show at the topside of the neck, the same way a left hander would want them. It may even be that the tunnel is empty and he's playing it like a left handed plectrum banjo.

Joel Hooks - Posted - 04/16/2020:  19:23:43


quote:

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

quote:

Originally posted by Joel Hooks

That Windsor is a regular (not reversed) 5 string with a tunneled 5th on the bottom (as he is playing it upside down or reverse).






While I agree that the banjo in the picture is a 5-string with a tunneled fifth on the bottom, it still appears to me that the strings (the ones that can actually be seen) are strung for a left handed player. The way it is held, the largest strings show at the topside of the neck, the same way a left hander would want them. It may even be that the tunnel is empty and he's playing it like a left handed plectrum banjo.






Yes, it looks to be strung in reverse.



I have been "left handed" for as long as I have been able to hold a writing tool.  I use both hand to play the banjo.  There are a couple of trick pieces that I play that are just slurs and snaps with my left hand, perhaps that is playing "left handed", but I still hold the banjo the normal way.



 While there are a select minority of people who need to hold instruments in reverse for various reasons, the rest of us do just fine the regular way.



I just don't buy into "left handed" playing. There is regular and reverse, handedness has noting to do with it.



Most of the world do not need reverse piano keyboards, upside down harmonicas, backwards brass instruments, or reverse violin family instruments (how often does one see that in an orchestra?).

guitarbanjoman - Posted - 04/16/2020:  19:50:16


I hear you, Joel. I am a fellow lefty playing righty.



But, guys, bear with me here...



Imagine that you are a left-handed multi-millionaire who wants to buy a plectrum banjo...



...imagine without blinking, you could buy yourself literally any plectrum banjo in the entire world...



...dozens of them! hell, you could buy the whole factory...



... so what kind of plectrum banjo would YOU choose?



... would it be a right handed “tunnel” model five string Windsor Premier...



... which you buy specificslly in order to play left-handed with its “tunnel” facing down?



I think most of us here would say that is pretty ridiculous....



...that there must be some other reason why Paul McCartney would own such a silly-ass kind of banjo...



Well, I can only think of one reason... how about you guys?


Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 04/16/2020 19:53:13

rcc56 - Posted - 04/16/2020:  22:01:35


There were a lot of banjos floating around in a lot of homes in the very early 60's. Some were old jazz age tenors and plectrums that had belonged to an older family member, and 5 strings enjoyed a period of popularity in the US during the late 50's and early 60's.



Those who grew up after the Beatles hit tend to think of the guitar as being the most universal instrument, but in my earliest days, more people played pianos or wind instruments. The instruments I remember the adults playing when I was very young were piano, trumpet, violin, and yes, an occasional banjo. My father, who played a bit of guitar, was an exception. And I also remember him playing a banjo back around 1961 or 62. A few years later, his banjo was gone.



I'm not going to speak for McCartney, but the chances that a banjo might have been among the instruments in his musical family's household when he was a youngster are not far-fetched. There might even have been a banjo lying in a corner in the Harrison or Starkey home in the 50's. And didn't some English guitarist who played in another band start out his rock career playing a guitar with 5 strings tuned to a G chord? I wonder why he got started that way.



Elizabeth Cotten was known to play a 5 string banjo upside down and backwards from time to time.



Musical trends change. Since the 1880's, the US has had love affairs with 5 string banjos, mandolins, ukeleles, 4 string banjos, wind instruments, pianos, guitars, and electronic keyboards. At this moment, the number one selling instrument in the US is the ukelele [hello in there Gibson, you're still not paying attention], banjo and mandolin sales are up, electric guitar sales are down [hello again, Gibson], and my local music store is selling a fair number of cellos.



20 years ago, you couldn't give away an open back banjo in my part of the country.  Now they're in demand.  And now tenors are gaining interest because of the increasing popularity of Irish and Scottish music.  Better buy your old Vega short scale tenor now, while they're still cheaper than a Gold Tone.



Banjos are an interesting musical phenomenon. Every time the US thinks they are gone for good, they keep coming back again, like the cat in the old song.


Edited by - rcc56 on 04/16/2020 22:11:52

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