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 Playing Advice: Clawhammer and Old-Time Styles
 ARCHIVED TOPIC: TOTW (OT) 12/19/14 - Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/296368

EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 12/19/2014:  20:30:23


Today's Tune of the Week, a quick "emergency back-up tune", is Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune, which comes to us from fiddler Audley Cable, via Bruce Greene.



Audley Cable (1909-1993) was born in Wolfe County, Kentucky, but lived most of his life in Michigan.  He retired to Florida, where Bruce Greene recorded him in 1985. One of the tunes Audley played was an unnamed tune in D, which he said he had learned from one Noah Jamison. I have not been able to discover much of anything about Noah, and it is not clear whether he was from Kentucky, Michigan, Florida, or elsewhere (the best candidate is a Noah H. Jamison, born about 1870 in Greenup County, Kentucky). Audley evidently thought of it as a tune with no name (an unidentified woman on Bruce Greene's field recording actually asks Bruce if he knows what it is called), but referred to it as "Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune", and that is title it has gone by since entering the wider old-time repertoire.



 



Audley's version can be heard on the Digital Library of Appalachia site: cdm16020.contentdm.oclc.org/cd...631/rec/6



The tune is included in the Milliner-Koken Collection (#960), and there is an audio clip on the Slippery Hill site: slippery-hill.com/M-K/



Banjo tablature can be found on the MossyRoof site: stringband.mossyroof.com/Uncle..._Tune.png



 



 photo AudleyCable.jpg



Audley Cable



Edited by - EggerRidgeBoy on 12/19/2014 22:03:07

RG - Posted - 12/20/2014:  00:36:02


Great tune!!!


ChuckJo - Posted - 12/21/2014:  06:46:16


Nice selection!


Tamarack - Posted - 12/21/2014:  16:37:55


Very fine tune. I wonder if Audley Cable was a part of the migration from Appalachia to the Detroit area to work in the auto plants. Around the time of WWII Henry Ford, the Dodge brothers, and other auto companies sent buses to Kentucky and Tennessee to recruit young men to work at places such as the Ford Rouge Plant, Dodge Main, and Willow Run. Many settled in in Detroit and formed their own subculture.

EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 12/21/2014:  22:28:37


Glad you all like the tune!



As for Audley's move to Michigan, he seems to have relocated to Muskegon sometime between 1920 and 1926, either with his family or - assuming the later end of that span - perhaps on his own as a teenager.  Muskegon at that time was experiencing a manufacturing boom since the city leaders had made a concerted effort to attract new industry to the area after its timber reserves had been exhausted around 1900.



As you note, a great number of people from Appalachia moved north in search of work throughout much of the 20th Century - especially during the WWII era.  I didn't know that companies sent busses south to recruit such workers (there must be a song in there somewhere).



When sharing my knowledge of bluegrass music history with people who aren't too familiar with the genre, it almost always surprises them to learn that midwestern cities such as Cincinnati, Dayton, and Detroit (and east coast cities such as Baltimore and D.C.) were important early centers of bluegrass music in the 1940s and 50s, since they associate the music solely with rural, southern Appalachia. And of course those cities had thriving old-time stringband communities as well.



I don't know if there was ever much old-time or bluegrass music in Muskegon. I have family connections a bit north of there - I'll do a bit of research the next time I am in the area.


JanetB - Posted - 12/22/2014:  14:52:47


Thanks for an interesting tune and fiddler to learn about this week, Bret.  Here's a bit more history:  In the Milliner-Koken American Fiddle Tunes book it says that in 1930 Audley Cable lived with Kentucky fiddler Darley Fulks in Muskegon, Michigan.  Mr. Cable had worked as a tooldresser in the oil fields.  Mr. Fulks also worked in the oil drilling business.  In Fulks' home in Kentucky there was an oil drilling rig in his yard and two oxen that used to pull the rig, so I'd assume the oil work was local, not in Michigan (these facts are according to liner notes in a CD called Traditional Music of Kentucky, Volume 2, recorded by John Harrod.)  Both fiddlers came from Wolfe County, Kentucky, though Fulks was older by 13 years.  I've become curious about Darley Fulks as a result of this bit of research.  He played banjo, too.



Here's my arrangement of Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune, as per notation in the Milliner-Koken book, as well as listening to the second half of Audley Cable's recording by Bruce Greene on the Slippery Hill site.




Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune (TOTW)


Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune tab

bhniko - Posted - 12/23/2014:  07:51:24


Janet,

Always a joy to hear you play. It is a lovely tune.


Zischkale - Posted - 12/23/2014:  09:57:15


I love the idea of unnamed tunes (though "Noah Jamison's" is as good a name as any)--I wonder if any fiddlers who learned it secondhand came up with some colorful title for it.



Nice playing, Janet -- I might need to track down that Milliner-Koken book...



Thanks for sharing. Merry Christmas, y'all!


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 12/24/2014:  10:11:13


quote:

Originally posted by JanetB

Thanks for an interesting tune and fiddler to learn about this week, Bret.  Here's a bit more history:  In the Milliner-Koken American Fiddle Tunes book it says that in 1930 Audley Cable lived with Kentucky fiddler Darley Fulks in Muskegon, Michigan.  Mr. Cable had worked as a tooldresser in the oil fields.  Mr. Fulks also worked in the oil drilling business.  In Fulks' home in Kentucky there was an oil drilling rig in his yard and two oxen that used to pull the rig, so I'd assume the oil work was local, not in Michigan (these facts are according to liner notes in a CD called Traditional Music of Kentucky, Volume 2, recorded by John Harrod.)  Both fiddlers came from Wolfe County, Kentucky, though Fulks was older by 13 years.  I've become curious about Darley Fulks as a result of this bit of research.  He played banjo, too.




Here's my arrangement of Uncle Noah Jamison's Tune, as per notation in the Milliner-Koken book, as well as listening to the second half of Audley Cable's recording by Bruce Greene on the Slippery Hill site.







Janet - Thanks very much for that additional information on Audley.  And for posting your lovely version of the tune.


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