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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: TOTW: 9/2/2011: Rickett's Hornpipe


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/214862

trick420 - Posted - 09/02/2011:  13:23:27



Hey there everyone!



This weeks TOTW is Rickett's Hornpipe



I first heard it of course from the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and it's found on both their Heritage and Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind albums.



I did a search for an arrangement like theirs so I could transcribe it for Banjo but had no luck.  What I did find was what I suppose is the original version, which sounds quite a bit different.  The version I learned is from this site:  manythings.org/banjo/tunes/.



Some nice performances for your listening pleasure:



youtube.com/watch?v=AipPF1vMWuM



youtube.com/watch?v=fWN5BjLxc5s



youtube.com/watch?v=alcrzjj5fes



While it seems to be primarily a fiddle lead tune, here's some nice banjo versions:

youtube.com/watch?v=MhLXDZKuv0A



youtube.com/watch?v=dl3dWaosmcE (Cool minstrel performance)



Finally, my attempt at this tune can be found attached to this thread.  I intend to re-record it though, as this one is kinda old and was shortly after I learned it.



The fiddler's companion has this to say about the song:



ibiblio.org/fiddlers/RI_RJ.htm..._HORNPIPE



RICKETT'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "The Manchester Hornpipe [1]," "The New College Hornpipe" [1], "One Eyed Fiddler," "Raker's Hornpipe," "Sailor's Hornpipe [2],” “Texarkana Hornpipe,” “Tomorrow Morning,” “Yarmouth Hornpipe." English, Irish, American; Hornpipe, Breakdown. USA; Arizona, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, New England. Canada, Ontario. D Major (most versions): C Major (Hardings). Standard or ADae (some Southern versions, e.g. Tommy Jarrell) tunings. AABB. The particular Rickett honored in the title was a circus promoter, one John Bill Ricketts, a Scots immigrant who came from England in 1792 and flourished in America through the 1790's till about 1800, when his Philadelphia enterprise was destroyed in a fire on Dec. 17, 1799. He reportedly delighted his audiences by dancing hornpipes on the backs of galloping horses (Tribe), and toward the end of his career hired another famous American hornpipe dancer, John Durang, to produce pantomimes for him.  Alan Jabbour (in "American Fiddle Tunes") says that circuses under his name appeared in New York City, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Charlestown, Albany, Boston, Hartford, and Montreal.



***



The earliest appearance of the melody, finds Jabbour, was in Alexander McGlashan's Edinburgh-published Collection of Scots Measures of 1781, with the notation "danced by Aldridge," a reference to the great Irish-born dancer of the late 18th century Robert Aldridge (see note for "Aldridge's Hornpipe"). Krassen (1973) states that "Rickett's," common in the British Isles, is very popular in the Appalachians (albeit slightly less so than "Fisher's Hornpipe" which is easier to play), although in the South the tune lost all connections with the hornpipe dance, and is usually played at the same pace as a breakdown. Mike Yates (2002), however, demurs saying that “the tune was actually more popular in the northern cities and is one of the few tunes that is played in the south as a hornpipe.” Bayard (1981) agrees it is an "exceedingly well‑known" hornpipe whose title is almost invariably the same, and that it was as popular with fifers in Pennsylvania as fiddlers. It was also popular with northeastern U.S. fiddlers, notes Bronner (1987), who says that by the 1850's it was a common selection for fiddle‑tune collections. It retained its popularity into the 20th century and was cited as having frequently been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). At mid-century it was one of the tunes often in the repertories of amateur fiddlers throughout the country, as, for example with Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. Patrick Bonner, a fiddler from Beaver Island, Michigan, recorded the tune on 78 RPM for the Library of Congress. Bonner was the youngest son of immigrants from Arranmore Island, County Donegal (Beaver Island was destination for a number of Arranmore families), and the Donegal fiddle tradition can be heard in his playing. It was even recorded on a 78 RPM by the Irish-American group Dan Sullivan’s Shamrock Band. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, for the same institution by Herbert Halpert from Mississippi fiddler Stephen B. Tucker (b. 1859) in 1939 (under the title "Raker's Hornpipe"), and in 1937 from the playing of Luther Strong (Hazard, Kentucky). It was played by R.L. Stephens of Camp Hill, Alabama, at a contest in Columbus, Georgia, according to the Columbus Enquirer of December 10 & 12, 1926 (Cauthen, 1990). One Georgia band heard on mid-1920’s radio playing “Rickett’s Hornpipe” consisted of a pair of uncles and a pair of nephews; the uncles were fiddlers Newt and Ed Tench, aged sixty-four and sixty-one years of age, who claimed to have been playing the fiddle for forty-five years or more.  According to the newspaper the Atlanta Journal, they had “an enviable reputation as musicians in the mountain districts of Georgia,” and they had fiddled together so long that “harmony between the two is merely a matter of second nature.” (quoted by Wayne W. Daniel, Pickin’ on Peachtree, 1990, pg. 54).



***



Versions of “Rickett’s” are still quite common among traditional musicians in southern England, where its usually called “Pigeon on the Gate” or “We’ll Sit Upon the Gate.”



 



Hope you all enjoy this tune as much as I do.



 



Cheers,



Jeff


vrteach - Posted - 09/02/2011:  13:49:38





Good tune. Wish I could really play it, but it is fun to play along with someone who can. Here's a picture that may be John Bill Ricketts. The image is from the article on Wikipedia, which describes it as: John Bill Ricketts, aka, Breschard, the Circus Rider, by Gilbert Stuart



 


J-Walk - Posted - 09/02/2011:  15:22:14



Good choice, Jeff. That's another one of those tunes that I never got around to learning. But I will now.



Benton Flippen recorded a great version of this tune (sample here). It's just fiddle and guitar, so you can supply the banjo part.



It's also covered in Brad Leftwich's "Banjo Round Peak Style." 


Bill H - Posted - 09/02/2011:  15:32:00



Great choice. One of my all time favorites. I have learned several versions of this and have lately been working on a version close to that I heard on a recording of Clark Kessinger. As coincidence would have it, I just dowloaded my version of Ricketts Hornpipe to You Tube. Funny how much better you think you can play it until you see the video played back.



youtube.com/watch?v=LiFvBrPQmFY


J-Walk - Posted - 09/02/2011:  17:48:38



Thanks, TOTW. I appreciate what you do here.


ramjo - Posted - 09/02/2011:  17:54:19



quote:


Originally posted by J-Walk




Thanks, TOTW. I appreciate what you do here.






I do too.


mojo_monk - Posted - 09/03/2011:  06:37:15



Great choice! This is one of those tunes that seems to have been widespread among fiddlers of the previous generation - the ones many of us call the "old-timers." I have about 40 recordings of Rickett's HP from fiddlers hailing from different parts of KY, VA, WV, IL, MO, TX, and NC - which, to me, says a lot about how popular this old tune remained well into the 20th century! After checking out the all of the links I figure I'm obliged to add this one since it's the version I first heard & played along with: youtu.be/l3ZqnpdFM8Y



Also, I really appreciate the approach of Curly Miller and Clark Buehling (linked in the OP, too). If you want to hear what a "hornpipe" actually sounded like before the rise of the hoedown, then I think this is a great example.



I should probably learn this one. It's a good one!



 



-Sean


BANJOJUDY - Posted - 09/03/2011:  07:47:35



Rickett's Hornpipe is one of the first tunes I learned on banjo. 



Ken Perlman wrote an easy tab in his book, "Basic Clawhammer Banjo."    Ken also wrote a duet tab (lots of fun if you can find a buddy to play it with you-two banjos) in his book, "Everything You Wanted to Know About Clawhammer Banjo."



I like to play it twice slowly, with a lot of lilt, as in the Celtic tradition, and then I speed it up to contra dance speed, flatten it out a bit (no lilt) and play it that way twice. 



I went through my personal list of tunes I own, and here's a brief summary.



Benton Flippen - starts on the high part.  Great fiddle version.



Brad Leftwich - starts on the high part with lots of Galax banjo licks. 



Frank George - plays the B part differently - plays one B and then one A to make a total B part.  You can see this tab in Mile's Krassen's wonderful Clawhammer Banjo book.



The Old 78'S (Clark Bueling and Curly Miller mentioned earlier) combine this as  a duo with Old Katoone, giving the medley a very Celtic feel.



This appears as a medley by the Old Shamrock Band with Stacks of Barley as the second tune.  If you want to hear this with a true Irish lilt, see if you can get the 4 cd set from Propper Records on Farewell To Ireland.  Lots oif great songs in that.  Stacks of Barley is a G tune, and of course, RIckett's is a D, so for banjo players, the medley is a bit tricky.



 


ramjo - Posted - 09/03/2011:  12:03:45



Nice pick, Trick. I used to play this on guitar with a hammered dulcimer player--in hornpipe time--but forgot about it and never tried it on banjo. I too really liked the Curly Miller and Clark Buehling link you provided--its the hornpip-i-est of the bunch. I always wondered about who or where Ricketts was but was too lazy to look it up. So thanks for doing that too! (Great image, Erich. Interesting that  a circus empresario commands a Gilbert Stuart sitting, same as a President.)


Don Borchelt - Posted - 09/05/2011:  06:53:05



Nice choice for TOTW, Jeff, and some really fine links.  Here's a three-finger style duet, with myself and Jim Reed, recorded during a visit I made to Reed Hollow last Spring.  I'm picking my 1902 Fairbanks Whyte Laydie #2, Jim is on his 1925 ball-bearing Mastertone.  Jim is a natural on the five-string; he plays with a delicate touch and tone that you don't often hear.  His own banjo compositions, I think are very "fiddle-esque," to coin a phrase, melodically eccentric in a very old-timey way.



Jim Reed and Don Borchelt picking Rickett's Hornpipe



This tune has been played for years as a reel at New England contra dances for generations, a very popular tune. 



Edited by - Don Borchelt on 09/05/2011 07:08:28

aeroweenie - Posted - 09/05/2011:  09:02:27


Great tune, one of my favorites. I about fell out of my chair reading that it was one of BANJOJUDY's first songs as I've been tinkering with it for over 30 years. Excellent info and links in this thread!

gailg64 - Posted - 09/05/2011:  10:00:33



Thanks for this suggestion--interesting history there & a great tune as well. Other nice Rickett's Hornpipes: Lauchlin Shaw & A. C. Overton's version was gorgeous-with Lauchlin's elegant fiddling & A.C.'s lyrical 2-finger banjo picking. Unfortunately the record/CD is out of print. I am digitizing some 1980s-early 90s cassettes I made at houseparties & if I find a recording will put it up on my hangout page & let everyone know.


Another fantastic version was Tommy Jarrell & Fred Cockerham's (still available I believe on a County CD). IMHO, Tommy's Rickett's was one of the finest tunes he played & of course, Fred Cockerham's banjo playing...well, what can you even say?


G


 


 


 


quote:


Originally posted by trick420




Hey there everyone!



This weeks TOTW is Rickett's Hornpipe



I first heard it of course from the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and it's found on both their Heritage and Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind albums.



I did a search for an arrangement like theirs so I could transcribe it for Banjo but had no luck.  What I did find was what I suppose is the original version, which sounds quite a bit different.  The version I learned is from this site:  manythings.org/banjo/tunes/.



Some nice performances for your listening pleasure:



youtube.com/watch?v=AipPF1vMWuM



youtube.com/watch?v=fWN5BjLxc5s



youtube.com/watch?v=alcrzjj5fes



While it seems to be primarily a fiddle lead tune, here's some nice banjo versions:

youtube.com/watch?v=MhLXDZKuv0A



youtube.com/watch?v=dl3dWaosmcE (Cool minstrel performance)



Finally, my attempt at this tune can be found attached to this thread.  I intend to re-record it though, as this one is kinda old and was shortly after I learned it.



The fiddler's companion has this to say about the song:



ibiblio.org/fiddlers/RI_RJ.htm..._HORNPIPE



RICKETT'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "The Manchester Hornpipe [1]," "The New College Hornpipe" [1], "One Eyed Fiddler," "Raker's Hornpipe," "Sailor's Hornpipe [2],” “Texarkana Hornpipe,” “Tomorrow Morning,” “Yarmouth Hornpipe." English, Irish, American; Hornpipe, Breakdown. USA; Arizona, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, New England. Canada, Ontario. D Major (most versions): C Major (Hardings). Standard or ADae (some Southern versions, e.g. Tommy Jarrell) tunings. AABB. The particular Rickett honored in the title was a circus promoter, one John Bill Ricketts, a Scots immigrant who came from England in 1792 and flourished in America through the 1790's till about 1800, when his Philadelphia enterprise was destroyed in a fire on Dec. 17, 1799. He reportedly delighted his audiences by dancing hornpipes on the backs of galloping horses (Tribe), and toward the end of his career hired another famous American hornpipe dancer, John Durang, to produce pantomimes for him.  Alan Jabbour (in "American Fiddle Tunes") says that circuses under his name appeared in New York City, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Charlestown, Albany, Boston, Hartford, and Montreal.



***



The earliest appearance of the melody, finds Jabbour, was in Alexander McGlashan's Edinburgh-published Collection of Scots Measures of 1781, with the notation "danced by Aldridge," a reference to the great Irish-born dancer of the late 18th century Robert Aldridge (see note for "Aldridge's Hornpipe"). Krassen (1973) states that "Rickett's," common in the British Isles, is very popular in the Appalachians (albeit slightly less so than "Fisher's Hornpipe" which is easier to play), although in the South the tune lost all connections with the hornpipe dance, and is usually played at the same pace as a breakdown. Mike Yates (2002), however, demurs saying that “the tune was actually more popular in the northern cities and is one of the few tunes that is played in the south as a hornpipe.” Bayard (1981) agrees it is an "exceedingly well‑known" hornpipe whose title is almost invariably the same, and that it was as popular with fifers in Pennsylvania as fiddlers. It was also popular with northeastern U.S. fiddlers, notes Bronner (1987), who says that by the 1850's it was a common selection for fiddle‑tune collections. It retained its popularity into the 20th century and was cited as having frequently been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). At mid-century it was one of the tunes often in the repertories of amateur fiddlers throughout the country, as, for example with Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. Patrick Bonner, a fiddler from Beaver Island, Michigan, recorded the tune on 78 RPM for the Library of Congress. Bonner was the youngest son of immigrants from Arranmore Island, County Donegal (Beaver Island was destination for a number of Arranmore families), and the Donegal fiddle tradition can be heard in his playing. It was even recorded on a 78 RPM by the Irish-American group Dan Sullivan’s Shamrock Band. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, for the same institution by Herbert Halpert from Mississippi fiddler Stephen B. Tucker (b. 1859) in 1939 (under the title "Raker's Hornpipe"), and in 1937 from the playing of Luther Strong (Hazard, Kentucky). It was played by R.L. Stephens of Camp Hill, Alabama, at a contest in Columbus, Georgia, according to the Columbus Enquirer of December 10 & 12, 1926 (Cauthen, 1990). One Georgia band heard on mid-1920’s radio playing “Rickett’s Hornpipe” consisted of a pair of uncles and a pair of nephews; the uncles were fiddlers Newt and Ed Tench, aged sixty-four and sixty-one years of age, who claimed to have been playing the fiddle for forty-five years or more.  According to the newspaper the Atlanta Journal, they had “an enviable reputation as musicians in the mountain districts of Georgia,” and they had fiddled together so long that “harmony between the two is merely a matter of second nature.” (quoted by Wayne W. Daniel, Pickin’ on Peachtree, 1990, pg. 54).



***



Versions of “Rickett’s” are still quite common among traditional musicians in southern England, where its usually called “Pigeon on the Gate” or “We’ll Sit Upon the Gate.”



 



Hope you all enjoy this tune as much as I do.



 



Cheers,



Jeff






 


gailg64 - Posted - 09/05/2011:  11:09:23



Posted a field recording of NC banjo player A. C. Overton & fiddler Lauchlin Shaw's version of Rickett's Hornpiple--on my Hangout page. WUNC Radio Fundraiser, Spring 1992. Lauchlin Shaw, fiddle; A. C. Overton-2-finger banjo, Wayne Martin-guitar


 


quote:


Originally posted by gailg64




Thanks for this suggestion--interesting history there & a great tune as well. Other nice Rickett's Hornpipes: Lauchlin Shaw & A. C. Overton's version was gorgeous-with Lauchlin's elegant fiddling & A.C.'s lyrical 2-finger banjo picking. Unfortunately the record/CD is out of print. I am digitizing some 1980s-early 90s cassettes I made at houseparties & if I find a recording will put it up on my hangout page & let everyone


know.


Another


fantastic version was Tommy Jarrell & Fred Cockerham's (still available I believe on a County CD). IMHO, Tommy's Rickett's was one of the finest tunes he played & of course, Fred Cockerham's banjo playing...well, what can you even say?


G


 


 


 


quote:


Originally posted by trick420





Hey there everyone!



This weeks TOTW is Rickett's Hornpipe



I first heard it of course from the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and it's found on both their Heritage and Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind albums.



I did a search for an arrangement like theirs so I could transcribe it for Banjo but had no luck.  What I did find was what I suppose is the original version, which sounds quite a bit different.  The version I learned is from this site:  manythings.org/banjo/tunes/.



Some nice performances for your listening pleasure:



youtube.com/watch?v=AipPF1vMWuM



youtube.com/watch?v=fWN5BjLxc5s



youtube.com/watch?v=alcrzjj5fes



While it seems to be primarily a fiddle lead tune, here's some nice banjo versions:

youtube.com/watch?v=MhLXDZKuv0A



youtube.com/watch?v=dl3dWaosmcE (Cool minstrel performance)



Finally, my attempt at this tune can be found attached to this thread.  I intend to re-record it though, as this one is kinda old and was shortly after I learned it.



The fiddler's companion has this to say about the song:



ibiblio.org/fiddlers/RI_RJ.htm..._HORNPIPE



RICKETT'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "The Manchester Hornpipe [1]," "The New College Hornpipe" [1], "One Eyed Fiddler," "Raker's Hornpipe," "Sailor's Hornpipe [2],” “Texarkana Hornpipe,” “Tomorrow Morning,” “Yarmouth Hornpipe." English, Irish, American; Hornpipe, Breakdown. USA; Arizona, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, New England. Canada, Ontario. D Major (most versions): C Major (Hardings). Standard or ADae (some Southern versions, e.g. Tommy Jarrell) tunings. AABB. The particular Rickett honored in the title was a circus promoter, one John Bill Ricketts, a Scots immigrant who came from England in 1792 and flourished in America through the 1790's till about 1800, when his Philadelphia enterprise was destroyed in a fire on Dec. 17, 1799. He reportedly delighted his audiences by dancing hornpipes on the backs of galloping horses (Tribe), and toward the end of his career hired another famous American hornpipe dancer, John Durang, to produce pantomimes for him.  Alan Jabbour (in "American Fiddle Tunes") says that circuses under his name appeared in New York City, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Charlestown, Albany, Boston, Hartford, and Montreal.



***



The earliest appearance of the melody, finds Jabbour, was in Alexander McGlashan's Edinburgh-published Collection of Scots Measures of 1781, with the notation "danced by Aldridge," a reference to the great Irish-born dancer of the late 18th century Robert Aldridge (see note for "Aldridge's Hornpipe"). Krassen (1973) states that "Rickett's," common in the British Isles, is very popular in the Appalachians (albeit slightly less so than "Fisher's Hornpipe" which is easier to play), although in the South the tune lost all connections with the hornpipe dance, and is usually played at the same pace as a breakdown. Mike Yates (2002), however, demurs saying that “the tune was actually more popular in the northern cities and is one of the few tunes that is played in the south as a hornpipe.” Bayard (1981) agrees it is an "exceedingly well‑known" hornpipe whose title is almost invariably the same, and that it was as popular with fifers in Pennsylvania as fiddlers. It was also popular with northeastern U.S. fiddlers, notes Bronner (1987), who says that by the 1850's it was a common selection for fiddle‑tune collections. It retained its popularity into the 20th century and was cited as having frequently been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). At mid-century it was one of the tunes often in the repertories of amateur fiddlers throughout the country, as, for example with Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. Patrick Bonner, a fiddler from Beaver Island, Michigan, recorded the tune on 78 RPM for the Library of Congress. Bonner was the youngest son of immigrants from Arranmore Island, County Donegal (Beaver Island was destination for a number of Arranmore families), and the Donegal fiddle tradition can be heard in his playing. It was even recorded on a 78 RPM by the Irish-American group Dan Sullivan’s Shamrock Band. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, for the same institution by Herbert Halpert from Mississippi fiddler Stephen B. Tucker (b. 1859) in 1939 (under the title "Raker's Hornpipe"), and in 1937 from the playing of Luther Strong (Hazard, Kentucky). It was played by R.L. Stephens of Camp Hill, Alabama, at a contest in Columbus, Georgia, according to the Columbus Enquirer of December 10 & 12, 1926 (Cauthen, 1990). One Georgia band heard on mid-1920’s radio playing “Rickett’s Hornpipe” consisted of a pair of uncles and a pair of nephews; the uncles were fiddlers Newt and Ed Tench, aged sixty-four and sixty-one years of age, who claimed to have been playing the fiddle for forty-five years or more.  According to the newspaper the Atlanta Journal, they had “an enviable reputation as musicians in the mountain districts of Georgia,” and they had fiddled together so long that “harmony between the two is merely a matter of second nature.” (quoted by Wayne W. Daniel, Pickin’ on Peachtree, 1990, pg. 54).



***



Versions of “Rickett’s” are still quite common among traditional musicians in southern England, where its usually called “Pigeon on the Gate” or “We’ll Sit Upon the Gate.”



 



Hope you all enjoy this tune as much as I do.



 



Cheers,



Jeff






 






 


majikgator - Posted - 09/06/2011:  08:37:14



Great old tune, another one i always wonder why i haven't learned it, but there are so many. If i were to learn it i would probably opt for the Milles Krassen tab to work from. Once again Blanham's music files contain very good recordings of all the tunes in that book, thanks Bob. .hangoutstorage.com/jukebox.asp...D%3D20193  i wish i knew how to put a long url link as word like an HTML thing but i don't.



 


slabounty - Posted - 09/06/2011:  14:03:26


Some books with the tab for Rickett's Hornpipe here ... freezing-sunset-75.heroku.com/...une/1085.

blanham - Posted - 09/07/2011:  04:35:22



quote:


Originally posted by majikgator




Great old tune, another one i always wonder why i haven't learned it, but there are so many. If i were to learn it i would probably opt for the Milles Krassen tab to work from. Once again Blanham's music files contain very good recordings of all the tunes in that book, thanks Bob.



 






Since majikgator mentioned the one I recorded, I'll post it as an attachment.



The first part of Miles Krassen's banjo tab for Rickett's Hornpipe sounds almost unrecognizable to me, but I attribute that to being a regionally different version of the tune.  Who am I to say it's wrong?  It's like that with his Kitchen Girl banjo tab, too, which at first I thought didn't sound quite right; but now I see Miles fiddling Kitchen Girl on Youtube, and it matches the banjo tab EXACTLY.  Go figure --- today's "popular" versions of these old tunes aren't necessarily the "correct" ones. - Bob




Chapter5b - Rickett's Hornpipe

   

majikgator - Posted - 09/07/2011:  04:57:21



" Go figure --- today's "popular" versions of these old tunes aren't necessarily the "correct" ones "



i don't really know how you can have a correct per se but it does make it easier for jams i suppose but then again something is lost to popularity, Fiddlers interpretations are what we have to go by with these tunes. You can learn all the tunes in say Brad Leftwich's great Round Peak style tab book but unless you have a Tommy Jarrell type fiddler they aren't going to work. Playing with others that play a tune and even name a tune differently than me seems to be for me the norm, you gotta be fas on yer feet. Geography still plays a big part in how a tune is played as is the influence of popular tab books. My philosophy - if i like it that way i play it that way, if somebody else is leading i follow.


mojo_monk - Posted - 09/07/2011:  05:11:05



quote:


Originally posted by majikgator

 


My philosophy - if i like it that way i play it that way, if somebody else is leading i follow.






Wiser words are rarely spoken in the forums of BHO. Thanks.



 



-Sean


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