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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Tune of the Week: The Squirrel Hunters


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/155886

Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/21/2009:  18:53:19


If you don't own the John Hartford album"Wild Hog in the Red Brush", you are missing out. It's a spirited string band album, easily one of the finest I've come across. The very first thing you hear when you push play is the deep droning voice of John Hartford intoning "This is the Squirrel Hunterssss...", followed by a rowdy fiddle tune I LOVE.

Here's a link to the album (Amazon is kind enough to give you a sample): http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Hog-Brus...p/B0000002PD

I don't have the liner notes in front of me, but the Wikipedia page related to the album states that John gives the source as a Mr. Samuel Bayard. I'll chime in with whatever else I can dig up later, right now I'm stranded in NYC.

I'm clearly not the only one who loves the tune. Madison, WI is home to a band that went so far as to NAME themselves "(This is the) Squirrel Hunters"! Here is a YouTube video of the band playing their namesake tune: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADyD...ture=related

There are plenty of other videos of the tune on YouTube, but I thought I'd quickly highlight one that is a mando duet with Mike Compton (member of the Hartford String Band that played on Wild Hog in the Red Brush) and Brian Ray: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4del...ture=related

Grace Van't Hof plays a nice version: http://www.banjohangout.org/myhango...c.asp?ID=399

And finally, I've added my own recently recorded version to my Hangout page: http://www.banjohangout.org/myhango....asp?id=2414

Mark


Edited by - Mark Johnson on 08/25/2009 12:49:45

vrteach - Posted - 08/21/2009:  19:17:40


Great choice for a tune of the week.

Well, I'm at home on dial-up so I can't listen to your version, but I have a previous version of yours on permanent status on my mp3 player.

It is a great tune, although I'm at my best when backing up someone else on this one. If I can find it, I'll put up a version that I recorded with a couple of friends here in Central Illinois. Until then, I have a solo version on my music page (hopefully I did the link right).

This is a tune that is worth learning.

Erich -- There''s always room for cello..

http://vrteach.org/banjo/
http://prairiegrapevine.org/
U of Illinois-Springfield Old Time Music


Edited by - vrteach on 08/21/2009 19:21:30

Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/21/2009:  19:26:51


Hi Erich... I may post my "old" version of this tune too when I return to civilization (from NYC).

I typed most of this sitting in LaGuardia. It's not the eloquent study I intended, but it'll work. I failed to include a few things, which I'll post here instead of editing:

Here's the fiddler's companion listing: http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SPR...RREL_HUNTERS Like all of these tunes, it has many relatives and names. Here, it is listed as being in the key of D.

Here's another page I found with transcriptions of various fiddle tunes, one of which is the Squirrel Hunters: http://www.abbamoses.com/fiddledo/fiddlepage In his transcription, he puts it in G.

I play it in G mixolydian, and I think that might account for the difference in keys in the sources above (G mixolydian being largely the same as D, plus here the A part really hammers the D chord a lot).

Mark

LyleK - Posted - 08/21/2009:  19:48:30


Excellent! (esp. your uke, banjo, guitar *.mp3). I didn't learn this one until hearing it in central Illinois (with Erich and others). Speaking of transcriptions, there's a nice one on John Lamancusa's page (http://www.mne.psu.edu/lamancusa/tunes.htm) attributed to Chirps Smith.

LyleK
http://lylewk.home.comcast.net

BANJOJUDY - Posted - 08/22/2009:  06:05:57


I first heard this at an Albuquerque Folk Festival - 2 years ago - when The Wilders performed. You can see and hear their version on You Tube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K_1uk1YHac.

One day I listened to Chirp Smith's recording of it - like it a whole lot better than the Wilder's version.

********************************************************************''
Adam Hurt is coming to Albuquerque to perform a solo gig
on October 8th. Also will be holding fiddle and banjo classes.
Balloon Fiesta Week - you might want to plan a trip and join
the fun and lovely weather.
Email me for more information: inquiry@siliconheights.com
*********************************************************************

R Buck - Posted - 08/22/2009:  06:34:56


quote:
Originally posted by Mark Johnson

Mr. Samuel Bayard.-oV0&feature=related



That's Doctor Bayard, son. He was the grand old man of folklore at PSU until late in the 1970's. I had the honor of meeting him and being judged by him in fiddle contests way back then.

RobBob
Music; the best way to count time. It is a journey not a destination.
www.blueridgerounders.com

olbap - Posted - 08/22/2009:  06:38:10


quote:
Originally posted by Mark Johnson

If you don't own the John Hartford album"Wild Hog in the Red Brush", you are missing out.



+1

great version on your hangout page mark too.

Ol''Bap
http://www.oldtime.fr

vrteach - Posted - 08/22/2009:  07:36:44


Well, I haven't found the formal recording, but I did find one from our local jam back in November of 2008. I think it was the first time that Squirrel Hunters had been played at the jam, so there are really only three of us who knew it. Since then we play it pretty often, but unfortunately the fiddler who knows it the best has not been doing much music since his farm was hit by a tornado in March.

Anyway, it's on my BHO music page, and this should be a link to the player.

The most audible musicians are myself on the GoldTone WL-250, Mark Mathewson on mandolin, and Steve Staley on fiddle. There was at least one other fiddler (Sharon Graf and I think maybe Maureen Johnson was also there) and three guitars. Sounds as though we might have had a bass that evening, too.

Oh, and I play it out of a-modal.

Erich -- There''s always room for cello..

http://vrteach.org/banjo/
http://prairiegrapevine.org/
U of Illinois-Springfield Old Time Music


Edited by - vrteach on 08/22/2009 07:44:04

Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/22/2009:  08:46:34


Well now, I'm just plain ol confused.

Both of the transcriptions list the song as being in G (right? one sharp?) Fiddlers companion lists it in D. In the recording, I am playing it out of G modal, but now I have no idea why as the rest of the recordings to my ear put it in A mixolydian (at least, I'm playing out of A modal to match, and I sure hear a G major chord).

So, I have no idea what key this tune is [supposed to be] in whatsoever! Thoughts?

And my apologies to Doctor Bayard, I was not informed of his bona fides.

Mark


Edited by - Mark Johnson on 08/23/2009 08:30:51

ndlxs - Posted - 08/22/2009:  09:21:59


I just happen to have a copy of Mr Bayard's Magnum Opus, _Dance to the Fiddle, March to the Fife_, and he has 10 variants of the tune, all in the key of D but with the tune in whatever the appropriate A mode (aeolian?) of D. He lists alternate local titles, too, including Dilly's Favorite, Old Common Time, THe Pennsylvania Quickstep. Later today I will scan the section to PDF and I can email to whomever wishes to see if. The book is long out of print, and until recently my copy was on sale on amazon for over $200 (no takers).

Andy Alexis

Andy Alexis
Sacramento, Calif

Dock Jekel - Posted - 08/22/2009:  09:50:59


As usual, a tune-of-the-week that I have never heard of before. I like your version- sounds pro. Seems like your having fun with overdubbing. I would be happy to try the same, but my recording software does not go there.

__________________________________________________________________________

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

sgass - Posted - 08/22/2009:  11:57:51


quote:
Originally posted by Mark Johnson

Well now, I'm just plain ol confused.

Both of the transcriptions list the song as being in G (right? one flat?) Fiddlers companion lists it in D. In the recording, I am playing it out of G modal, but now I have no idea why as the rest of the recordings to my ear put it in A mixolydian (at least, I'm playing out of A modal to match, and I sure hear a G major chord).

So, I have no idea what key this tune is [supposed to be] in whatsoever! Thoughts?



The abbamoses.com transcription puts it in e minor for me. Or something. Seems like e minor for 2 bars, then G major for 2, alternating that way through the whole tune ... but I guess those would be D majors ending each part.

The version at Fiddlers Companion is the same notes (except for a few), but the key signature is D major (or b minor), and to my ear it sounds downright nasty with those c sharps.

Me, I think your version's the right one.

Steve

Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/22/2009:  13:32:13


I had the same thought, Steve. Ignoring the fact that I recorded it uncapoed and thus a whole step lower...

I would be playing it as an E for the first 2 measures, G for the next two, E again, G again and then I resolve to a D chord in the A part. In the B part I would play it as an A for 2, G for 2, A for 2, G for 2 and again end on the D chord. Now that I think about it, though, I've been playing a chord form for the E that leaves out the 3rd altogether, so it really could be an E minor, and hence in D Ionian or A Lydian as Andy suggests (which in turn is E Dorian).

Might be a fun project for a rainy day. I can dream of playing the same banjo line but backing it up with several progressions from several keys. As the A part never really hits on the A, you could play it in G Ionian but from the A modal tuning (E minor, G major, D in the A part and A minor, G and D for the B part).

Eh, that's enough of that. I think I broke my brain trying to sort it out. Whatever key or chords, I would play out of A modal if I were to match the other recordings out there, and I'm in G modal on mine.

Mark

MrSrubas - Posted - 08/22/2009:  17:12:35


SH:
Awesome tune. One of my favorites to play.
If I'm ambitious, I'll break out the recording gear later (don't hold your breath: 1: I'm not that good 2: I'm lazy and it probably won't happen.)

Key Signature:
How I play it (which was partially stolen from Mark Johnson and partially stolen from Wild Hog), and I had to break out the big guns for this (read: I called my daddy), Starts out E dorian, and then finishes A mixolydian (not counting mark's lack of capo). Both of which with (2) #'s and thus, no key change, but a pretty definite mode change.
I resolve on the D once in a while too, but I think it's an embellishment, not a tonic.

I spent most of the day on the golf course over a beer or two. Certainly wasn't planning on digging up the ol' theory talk on the hang out.
More beer now required.

Easy,
S.




Matt Buckley - Posted - 08/22/2009:  17:17:24


Ok, I'm pretty confused. Maybe I'm not reading carefully enough, but is there a consensus yet as to what tuning to use? The keys are interesting, but I'm much more interested in the tuning.

Cheers, Matt

oldwoodchuckb - Posted - 08/22/2009:  18:04:04


Matt,
I just tried it in double D and it seemed to work pretty well. As I'm hearing it, and there is always the question of if I'm hearing it right, it seems to be in the key of D to me. The first part is positively E dorian - which uses the D Major scale and the second part sounds like D mixolydian to me (harmonize with D and C) but the version I was playing with was the two mando version - so there were no strictly chord instruments in the mix.

I am certain about the first part. My first Irish tune was Drowsy Maggie and I went through every tuning I could think of until I discovered how nicely it laid out in Double D. It was only then that I realized the mode was dorian. Sometimes I have to get hit square in the forehead with a 2X4 to remember anything. I play a couple other tunes in E dorian combined with D now "Queen's Polka" is the one where I remember the title - although it seems like there is a version of Chinquapin in that key too - I'd have to look it up.

The second part could literally be D mixo or A dorian as I heard it but the chord sounded major to me - which puts me more in the D camp. Most of the Irish tunes that do E dorian for one part have the second in D also. Thus the old saying "Irish tunes never get away from D".

If you are interested in what I say on the hangout you should download a free copy of Rocket Science Banjo - the Advanced Method For Beginning to Intermediate Clawhammer Players. Along with the full text in PDF you will also find the four current RSB videos and the "25 EZ Clawhammer Tunes" at:
http://www.rocketsciencebanjo.com

To print the tabs separately from the book you need TEFView a free download from:
http://www.tabledit.com

Banjo Brad is still hosting "How To Mold A Mighty Pinky" and some other material at:
http://www.pricklypearmusic.net
A site chock full of interesting banjo material



Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/22/2009:  18:43:35


Matt- this won't give consensus, but again, I'm using modal tuning. In the case of my recording, G modal, but not really intentionally. Were I to play along to the rest, or re-record, I'd use A modal, though I could see Double D working nicely too.

I MADE STEVE SRUBAS POST ON THE BHO FOR THE 2ND TIME IN FOREVER!!! I really really really hope he gets off his lazy behind and records it, I'd love to hear it.

I've recorded it again, playing it 3 times through as close to the same banjo progression as I can maintain. Then I did a backup track on the guitar, playing in A mixolydian the first time, G Ionian the 2nd, and some non-key the third pass through using E major, G major and B minor for the A part, and A minor, G and D for the B part. It's not polished at all, but thought it might help make this all even more confusing... I'll post it for the life of this thread.

Mark

LyleK - Posted - 08/22/2009:  19:35:52


Hey Mark, I just took a closer look at the Fiddler's Companion classification of SH as D major. That's a mistake based on the "abc" notation. In "abc" you have various ways of specifying the key signature, for example "Dmaj", "Bmin", "Amix", and "Edor" would all give you two sharps (F# and C#). There are lots of copies of "abc" notation of SH that give the key as A mixolydian. But heck, most of the versions I've been hearing make only sparing use (if at all) of the C#, and instead use C natural, so A dorian.

Matt: O.K., I know most people detest discussions of modes. So, to play SH I would (and do) tune aEADE. The big decision then is whether to use the third fret on the third string (C natural) or the fourth fret (C#). That's where fretless is so sweet (3.5th "fret"?). OWC's recommendation of aDADE also works, but it makes it a bit harder because of the low Gs (5th fret 4th string in this tuning, versus 3rd fret in aEADE). I would only use aDADE if you need the low D, which you don't.

LyleK
http://lylewk.home.comcast.net

oldwoodchuckb - Posted - 08/22/2009:  20:05:58


Lyle
I would say I always needed the low D in the key of D but first I think there would have to be a consensus that the tune is in D. I'm going back to listen to more versions now.

If you are interested in what I say on the hangout you should download a free copy of Rocket Science Banjo - the Advanced Method For Beginning to Intermediate Clawhammer Players. Along with the full text in PDF you will also find the four current RSB videos and the "25 EZ Clawhammer Tunes" at:
http://www.rocketsciencebanjo.com

To print the tabs separately from the book you need TEFView a free download from:
http://www.tabledit.com

Banjo Brad is still hosting "How To Mold A Mighty Pinky" and some other material at:
http://www.pricklypearmusic.net
A site chock full of interesting banjo material



sgass - Posted - 08/22/2009:  20:24:59


Huh. Four years of music school, including several semesters of analysis classes, and it never even dawned on me that a piece of music could be in a key other than "major" or "minor". Now that I think about it, the idea of modal keys makes perfect sense, but geez, Mozart wouldn't have done it that way.

;)
Steve

MrSrubas - Posted - 08/22/2009:  20:54:12


alright, I'm in.
A few caveats though, not been playing much and haven't recorded in AGES.
Also, I had what I thought was a pretty solid recording and somehow managed to lose it while saving. (fish that got away, blah blah blah)

All the same, a pretty vanilla Squirrel Hunters, found here:
http://www.banjohangout.org/myhango....asp?id=5249

Easy,
S.

oldwoodchuckb - Posted - 08/22/2009:  21:35:59


I just wrote a long explanation of my harmony and then lost it while trying to add a youtube URL.

Briefly - I here the first part as going from Em to Bm and eventually to D before ending on the Dominant A, while the 2nd part is more A going to D going to G then to Bm and the D, ending again on the Dominant A.

I admit to having had a brief fling with Irish music and that it still colours my harmonic thinking. Listening to the BHO user versions it obviously works in this completely (And for the moment unfathomable to me) harmonic structure. I think if you were to compare it with tunes like "The Queen's Polka" which is played as an old time tune around my neck of the woods and "Drowsy Maggie" which isn't, you would be able to tell where I'm coming from harmonically.

This is quite interesting an I think I'll try it your way - if I can figure it out. I've not heard the Hartford recording, but the two mando version is what lead me to my conclusions. I couldn't get the one by the group that named itself after the tune to open. I'm going to post this and then add a link to a very clear single mando version I found on youtube that (I think) uses my harmony. I can also ask my friend Alan Julich who played guitar, bass and some banjo with Hartford at a number of gigs in the late 1990s, if he remembers the tune.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6Xh0_d41U0



If you are interested in what I say on the hangout you should download a free copy of Rocket Science Banjo - the Advanced Method For Beginning to Intermediate Clawhammer Players. Along with the full text in PDF you will also find the four current RSB videos and the "25 EZ Clawhammer Tunes" at:
http://www.rocketsciencebanjo.com

To print the tabs separately from the book you need TEFView a free download from:
http://www.tabledit.com

Banjo Brad is still hosting "How To Mold A Mighty Pinky" and some other material at:
http://www.pricklypearmusic.net
A site chock full of interesting banjo material




Edited by - oldwoodchuckb on 08/22/2009 21:39:06

oldwoodchuckb - Posted - 08/22/2009:  21:49:50


sgass

Miles Davis would.

One of the problems I have with modern harmony texts is that the other modes (other than Major and minor) are usually ignored, while the music I've been playing most of my life has been in Mixolydian and Dorian mode much more frequently than major and minor. A lot of the old songs used Phrygian and one other too (Lochrean?). I can never remember what the mode based on B was called but I remember my friend the musical genius, playing his dulcimer in that mode -- it didn't make much sense to me, but I'm not genius.



If you are interested in what I say on the hangout you should download a free copy of Rocket Science Banjo - the Advanced Method For Beginning to Intermediate Clawhammer Players. Along with the full text in PDF you will also find the four current RSB videos and the "25 EZ Clawhammer Tunes" at:
http://www.rocketsciencebanjo.com

To print the tabs separately from the book you need TEFView a free download from:
http://www.tabledit.com

Banjo Brad is still hosting "How To Mold A Mighty Pinky" and some other material at:
http://www.pricklypearmusic.net
A site chock full of interesting banjo material



oldwoodchuckb - Posted - 08/22/2009:  21:54:11


Just listened to Steve Srubas playing it on his homepage. Forget my convoluted paragraphs and just listen to it. Beautifully played too.

If you are interested in what I say on the hangout you should download a free copy of Rocket Science Banjo - the Advanced Method For Beginning to Intermediate Clawhammer Players. Along with the full text in PDF you will also find the four current RSB videos and the "25 EZ Clawhammer Tunes" at:
http://www.rocketsciencebanjo.com

To print the tabs separately from the book you need TEFView a free download from:
http://www.tabledit.com

Banjo Brad is still hosting "How To Mold A Mighty Pinky" and some other material at:
http://www.pricklypearmusic.net
A site chock full of interesting banjo material



Bisbonian - Posted - 08/22/2009:  22:56:50


Hey, I've played this song! At a jam an San Jose last month. Bunch of great Old Time fiddlers, and a couple of us banjos sitting in. They played it in D, I was in Double D. I didn't know it, of course, but I started picking it up after a few times through. I didn't put a name to it at the time, because they played A LOT of songs I didn't know, but I do remember now somebody saying "The Squirrel Hunters" somewhere along the way. Thanks, Mark, for posting this...now I can really set about learning it.

Ain't Tuna the Weak great?

"When Banjos are Outlawed, only Outlaws will have Banjos."

Loo P. - Posted - 08/23/2009:  05:58:49


Great choice Mark! Thanks.

Man, your playing keeps getting better and better.....Holy Smokes!

It sounds very similar to "Hail Against the Barndoor". I believe it's on the Old Time Banjo Festival CD.

kabulrocks - Posted - 08/23/2009:  06:05:51


Thanks for the "Wild Hog in the Red Brush" recommendation...this is making me want to go back to Silver Dollar City!

Don Borchelt - Posted - 08/23/2009:  07:49:34


This is a truly inspired choice. All great versions, Mark, Eric, and Steve. Steve, I had to download your version to my hard drive, because it was distorting played through the BHO jukebox. It was well worth the effort. After listening to all you guys, I put together a quick three finger version, just finished. This is my tentative first try, recorded without fingerpicks. Don't say you like it better without fingerpicks, 'cuz that ain't gonna happen....

My first attempt at Squirrel Hunters

One of the neat things about this tune is the ambiguity of the home tone, as Tony pointed out. I ended up coming down on the side of G. It does sound neat with the D chord in the beginning, though. The banjo is tuned gDGAD, which is the tuning I use for G modal tunes. It really works great for this scale, because that open A can ring out really nice without effort.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don''t like to play it like he did. I try to play it the way I play it" - fiddler Lester McCumbers, interviewed by Erynn Marshall
Check out my webpage.


Edited by - Don Borchelt on 08/23/2009 09:05:56

ndlxs - Posted - 08/23/2009:  11:34:18


Very cool version, Don...

Andy Alexis
Sacramento, Calif

Paul Roberts - Posted - 08/23/2009:  14:43:39


Mark,
Your lilting, pulsing style is mesmerizing and intoxicating.
Gorgeous melody!



http://www.banjocrazy.com/ - Gold Tone Banjo Dealer - Articles - Interviews
http://www.youtube.com/user/strumstering My YouTube Channel

Matt Buckley - Posted - 08/23/2009:  16:52:00


quote:
Originally posted by LyleK

Matt: O.K., I know most people detest discussions of modes. So, to play SH I would (and do) tune aEADE. The big decision then is whether to use the third fret on the third string (C natural) or the fourth fret (C#). That's where fretless is so sweet (3.5th "fret"?).


Thanks Lyle. Just worked it out in aEADE. The third string does present an interesting issue, and I've been experimenting with it three ways, i.e. natural, sharp and avoiding the note altogether. They all have their appeal.

Great, great tune.

Cheers, Matt


Edited by - Matt Buckley on 08/23/2009 16:52:52

MrSrubas - Posted - 08/23/2009:  18:22:27


Nice one, Don!

S.

jojo25 - Posted - 08/24/2009:  07:07:12


can't resist weighing in here...I too learned this via the Hartford version, thanks to fiddler Jim Perrot from Clinton, Iowa...a wonderful OT fiddler by the way

I play this in AEAC#E tuning. Just did this last nite with the Terrapin Ridge Ramblers. Just 2 chords (chords!! OMG, run fer the hills!)...A major and G major. In my humble addled brain this tune is an A tune...period...but you all can be moody and modey if you wish

And I love the Wilders version! Betse has a great swingy feel for this tune...plus, there is no banjo...so you can play along with it and ADD the banjo in...a great pratice tool. No, it is not the way John Hartford did it, but so what? She owns this tune!

Methinks that the confusion about the key of this tune is that it is in a Mode of A that drops the G# note, you play G natural instead...so we see a key signature of just 2 sharps and think "key of D"....but it is an A tune my wonderful friends...as to playing it out of double D tuning...that is an interesting thought and I'll have to try that...soon

and E minor...no way! I recently enhanced my evil reputation as chord Nazi at Moldy Jam when some folks were getting ready to play this tune and mentioned E minor and I roundly chastised them

But I could be all wrong. I was wrong once before...but it was a mistake

Don''t forget to play all of the quasihemidemisemiquavers!!
Drop thumbs, not bombs

Joe


Edited by - jojo25 on 08/25/2009 11:11:54

jasper - Posted - 08/24/2009:  09:44:27


Great tune whatever key it's in.I'm a banjo player first, but my wife and I took to the fiddles and spent a very large part of Sat, and some of Sun. learning this tune. Then i promtly got together with my jammin buddies and taught them the tune Sun. afternoon. Now all i gotta do is learn it on the banjo, go figure

Relax,grab your Banjo, have a Homebrew.

ndlxs - Posted - 08/24/2009:  09:56:17


Folks,
Take a look/listen to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6v1oD_pF-k

Same tune, different key!

Andy Alexis
Sacramento, Calif

Don Borchelt - Posted - 08/24/2009:  16:22:37


Okay, assuming that this is normally in A on the fiddle, is the fiddle tuned standard GDAE, or it cross tuned AEAE? Anybody know?



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don''t like to play it like he did. I try to play it the way I play it" - fiddler Lester McCumbers, interviewed by Erynn Marshall
Check out my webpage.

MrSrubas - Posted - 08/24/2009:  18:26:47


quote:
...GDAE, or it cross tuned AEAE?

I believe my brother typically fiddles it in standard. He typically brings two, one of each, so I don't think he's just being stubborn...

Easy,
S.


Edited by - MrSrubas on 08/24/2009 18:27:54

Don Borchelt - Posted - 08/24/2009:  20:08:53


Thanks, Steve.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don''t like to play it like he did. I try to play it the way I play it" - fiddler Lester McCumbers, interviewed by Erynn Marshall
Check out my webpage.

jasper - Posted - 08/24/2009:  21:15:52


We learned it in Standard tuning.

Relax,grab your Banjo, have a Homebrew.

Don Borchelt - Posted - 08/30/2009:  08:52:42


Okay, I'm still working on last week's tune-of-the-week. Whattya want for a three-finger picker, we're slow. This is what I've got so far. Still have to tinker with the up the neck break, but here it is:

Squirrel Hunters, so far so good.




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don''t like to play it like he did. I try to play it the way I play it" - fiddler Lester McCumbers, interviewed by Erynn Marshall
Check out my webpage.


Edited by - Don Borchelt on 08/30/2009 08:53:09

ndlxs - Posted - 08/30/2009:  12:38:20


Ever better, love the reverb.

Andy Alexis
Sacramento, Calif

Don Borchelt - Posted - 08/30/2009:  15:30:11


Andy wrote: "...love the reverb."

You know, to tell the truth, it's not by choice, Andy. I recorded this on my little Tascam DR-1, and the reverb all of a sudden showed up just before Clifftop. I would actually like to dial it back some, but I haven't figured out how yet. I was never too good at deciphering the manuals to these things. For awhile it was playing back really slow, but I finally got that fixed. I just have to figure out where all of these functions are hidden.



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"I don''t like to play it like he did. I try to play it the way I play it" - fiddler Lester McCumbers, interviewed by Erynn Marshall
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Edited by - Don Borchelt on 08/30/2009 15:32:17

Mark Johnson - Posted - 08/31/2009:  07:55:59


Dang! That's lovely Don. Of course you've just done away with any free time I have tonight as now I have to figure out an up the neck break and a fretless version too!

Really great.

Mark

Bisbonian - Posted - 09/03/2009:  21:15:01


I looked through the thread, and I didn't see that anyone had posted this. With all the terrific versions posted here, I don't think the thread would be complete without one from John Hartford himself: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV98pfwsM3k

"When Banjos are Outlawed, only Outlaws will have Banjos."

atleson - Posted - 09/04/2009:  14:57:55


hi,

anyone have a tab version of "Squirrel Hunters"?

jim

jim atleson

Mark Johnson - Posted - 09/04/2009:  19:17:14


I made one (in tabledit) based more or less on the version I posted.

I'd be happy to email it to anyone interested. Or I could post it here if someone would kindly remind me how I do so (been a few years since I tried to get that fancy with the BHO).

Mark

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