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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Lefthand and positioning fingers


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/81129

banjo305 - Posted - 04/26/2007:  06:37:56


I was wondering if someone can help me out. I've been practicing my chords from info that I found online-here and other sites-, but I can't find sites that show you how to place your fingers. Its always lines with dots indicting which string to press. Can someone point out a link to somewhere where they show the finger positioning?

joebiker - Posted - 04/26/2007:  07:33:54


Most folks who are teaching starter banjo use this rule of thumb. The highest fret used will be the index finger, the second fret used will be the middle finger and the third fret used will be the ring finger, In the case of an open C it's what is most comfortable since there are two strings fretted at the second..only in four finger fretted chords will the little finger get used. This is not always the case after you start advancing though, but by then you'll have sorted out what works best for you.

Here's an example. Open C

1 bing the index,
2 being the ring
3 being the middle

---l--2-l-----l-----l------
-1-l----l-----l-----l------
---l----l-----l-----l-------
---l--3-l-----l-----l-------

Open D7

1 being the index
2 being the middle

---l----l-----l-----l------
-1-l----l-----l-----l------
---l-2--l-----l-----l-------
---l----l-----l-----l-------


I'm no teacher by any means but that's the theory I go by.

I also found that the Murphy Henry DVDs really helped me to get started as well..Highly recommended on the Hangout.





Somethings never change with time..there's nothing better than a lick...

Joebiker


Edited by - joebiker on 04/26/2007 07:35:38

Scarecrow - Posted - 04/26/2007:  08:17:05


Joe's advice will give you a sound start. As he says, be prepared to change when your chord-playing becomes more advanced. The principle of minimum movement will come into play.
Check this too:
http://www.elderly.com/books/cats/230.1.html


"A man's gotta know his limitations."

banjo305 - Posted - 04/26/2007:  09:22:12


Thanks guys. I appreciate all the help I get. I don't want to build any bad habits and have to re-learrn proper technique down the road.

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