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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: TOTW 5/24/13 - Devil in the Haystack


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/263363

EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/24/2013:  12:30:14


 



Today’s Tune of the Week is Devil in the Haystack, which comes to us from southern Illinois fiddler Harvey ‘Pappy’ Taylor.



PAPPY TAYLOR (1894-1987)



Pappy was born into a musical family in Effingham County, Illinois, in 1894.  His parents sang together at home, and his grandfather played the fiddle.  Pappy learned to play from his grandfather and from Joe Dixon, a fellow Illinois native and former circus musician.  Other than the occasional factory job, Pappy spent most of his adult life working for the railroad, and said that he was best as a "Tie Hack," a worker who hand hews railroad ties into shape.  In the 1940s and 1950s Taylor played in group called The Down State Ramblers, and later in life played regularly with a country band at a bar near his home. Other than that he seems to have mostly played with friends and family at home and at local gatherings and dances.





Pappy (far right) and other bandmembers of The Down State Ramblers.



Most of Pappy’s repertoire came from his family, from Joe Dixon, and from other fiddlers in his area of Illinois, but it is not known from whom he learned Devil in the Haystack. As Steve Harrison, who along with his brother Garry made numerous field recordings of Pappy in the 1970s, explains:



From what we gather, there were several good fiddlers in Pappy's 'neck of the woods' (a loosely populated area along Highway 40 between Effingham and Altamont,  known locally/colloquially as "Keptown," though there's no real "town"  there per se), along with some musical family members.  So most of the tunes were sourced by Pappy as something to the effect of: "Oh, everybody played that one," that I suspect “Devil In The Haystack” would fit in that category.



The only specific comment Pappy made about the tune was that it had been played since “way back before the Civil War”.



 



THE 1970s FIELD RECORDINGS



The only reason we know of that comment – indeed the only reason we know of Pappy and his music – is due to the efforts of a group of young string band musicians who in the mid-1970s made it their mission to find, learn from, and record older traditional musicians from southern Illinois.  Garry Harrison, Steve Harrison, Lynn ‘Chirps’ Smith and others, realizing that the music of their native region had not been well documented, began visiting and interviewing musicians in the area, in order to learn and preserve the numerous unique and little-known tunes they played.



In 1996, Lynn Smith described those early efforts:



"We were looking for the older guys who learned the music before radios came around," says Smith. "They were pretty much on their own at that time, rather than absorbing all the influences from recordings and radio. Of course, all those people we met back then are all deceased now."



Smith and Harrison were fortunate in that they hit pay dirt almost immediately when they met Harvey "Pappy" Taylor.



"Pappy Taylor, of Effingham, was pretty well known around that area, and one of our best sources of tunes ever," says Smith. "We were pleasantly surprised we found somebody good right off the bat. He was born in the 1890s and he was the greatest."



Taylor knew hundreds--some claim even thousands--of tunes, and was blessed with amazing recall, being able to recount where he learned virtually every one. From Taylor, Smith and Harrison followed leads to more and more old fiddling men who were eager to share tunes and stories. Eventually the young musical detectives received some grant money, allowing them to purchase better recording equipment to take it all down. These recordings now reside in the archives of the Tarble Arts Center at Eastern Illinois University as well as the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.



Steve Harrison recently shared his own memories of visiting and recording Pappy:



As to Pappy, I can't remember which tune it was off the top of my head, but I do remember being awe-struck at his telling about how he learned. It was one of the Joe Dixon tunes that pappy heard Joe play on stage (or in a tent) at a circus. Pappy said he loved the tune, but had to walk back home (about 5 miles, as he told it) humming that tune in his head so he didn't lose it, until he could get out his fiddle and find it. And there's a good definition of the "oral tradition." Who knows whether Pappy captured the tune with tape recorder fidelity in his head, and whether he was able to note-for-note work it up on his fiddle.



But you know what? It doesn't matter. That's the oral tradition. Everybody puts their own mark on it as it gets passed around. It wasn't an exact science, and that's one of the things I came to appreciate about it. There's no "right" way to play it, especially since so many of those tunes were of local or regional origin and were never set to musical score, at least by the original fiddler who "made" the tune. Which is another interesting trait of how our old friends expressed things. I don't remember any of them ever saying that so-and-so "wrote" that tune. He "made" it, like you'd make something in your wood shop. And very likely, not a note of it was ever actually written down until it got circulated around enough to fall into the lap of a trained musicologist.





Steve Harrison records Harvey "Pappy" Taylor, Effingham, IL, at Pappy's home, in 1977.

Photo by Carl Fleischhauer



 



THE INDIAN CREEK DELTA BOYS



Around 1975 several members of the group formed a band, The Indian Creek Delta Boys.  The prime mission of the "Crick Delters”, as they were nicknamed, was, in Steve Harrison’s words,” to learn, work up as a band, and put back into circulation the rare old tunes taught to us by Pappy and eventually scores of other senior Midwest fiddlers”.



Originally consisting of Garry Harrison, Terry Harrison, and John Bishop, the band over its 20-year history included a number of other musicians, including Steve Harrison, Lynn ‘Chirps’ Smith, Dave Miller, Gaye Harrison, John Holliday, and Dan Baird. They released four albums, the first of which, “The Indian Creek Delta Boys” (1976), contains their version of Devil in the Haystack, along with several other tunes they had learned from Pappy.  Steve Harrison remembers Pappy’s reaction to one of those other tracks:



Another little anecdote about Pappy . If you've seen the first album by Indian Creek Delta Boys, you would find a tune on there shared by Pappy by the title "Golden Grip." Great tune. Well, after that album came out we of course gave Pappy a copy of it. On a subsequent visit just a week or so after that, Pappy laid a good one on us. To background it a little bit -- Pappy nearly always had a plug of tobacco in his jaw, and I don't know if he even owned a set of false teeth, so sometimes it was a little dicey to accurately catch just what he was saying. He also had this thing he said as sort of a prefix to every statement. The prefix was: "You fellers, you know what I mean?" 'Course, it was delivered in rapid: You'pellersyouknowwhattamean?"



Well, we could tell that Pappy had something to tell us after having reviewed the album, and his several tunes that were included on it,  by his hem-hawing around about something. Finally, he spit it out: "Youpellersyouknowwhattamean, you did a real good job on that one" (pointing to the tune title on the album jacket). Well, we were instantly gratified. Then he continued: "Except for one thing..." (Ruh-roh). ........ [long, excruciatingly long pause]............... [slowly reaches for his spit can and poits a gob into it].......... [looks up and with that impish Pappy twinkle and toothless grin drops it on us]............"It's DRIP." 



Yep. Even after reviewing the field recording session tape, it still sounded like he said "GRIP." Foiled by Red Man tobacco again. Too late to change anything as the album had already been circulating for over a month. Ah, well. Leave it a "GRIP."



In 1976 the band began working with Eastern Illinois University, first contributing recordings to the University’s music archives, and later selecting traditional musicians to appear at the school’s annual arts festival.  Because of those efforts, in 1981 they were named the 'Official State of Illinois - Traditional Illinois Old-Time String Band' by act of the State of Illinois 82nd General Assembly, in recognition of their “singular contribution to establishing for Illinois its own place in American musical history.”



The Crick Delters continued to record traditional musicians and play various festivals and events throughout the Midwest until disbanding in the mid-1990s.





The Indian Creek Delta Boys, 1978

L-R: Gaye Harrison, John Bishop, Lynn Smith, Garry Harrison, John Holliday, Steve Harrison



 



DEAR OLD ILLINOIS



The recording and preservation efforts of those in the Indian Creek Delta Boys culminated in the wonderful 2007 boxed set “Dear Old Illinois”, compiled by Garry Harrison and Jo Burgess.   A mammoth, decade-long project, the set consisted of notation for 752 Illinois fiddle tunes and three CDs containing a selection of the field recordings collected over the years.  For Devil in the Haystack the book contains the following information:



"Devil in the Haystack" was recorded from Harvey "Pappy" Taylor at his

home in Effingham, IL on May 6, 1975.  Mr. Taylor was born in 1894 and

passed away in 1987.



A tie hacker on the rr & later a factory worker, he was born near Keptown and learned many of his pieces from local sources.  In his younger years, he lived for a time in WV where he had cousins who played fiddle, and he learned a few pieces from them. He also
credited Joe Dixon, a former circus fiddler, as a source of other pieces that he played.  His father and mother both sang but did not play instruments.

He never laid the fiddle aside; he played music regularly with guitar player Mike Wilson and got together with fiddler Harry Jones often as well.  At the time we met him, Mr. Taylor was active with a band and playing every Saturday night, as he had for years, at the Midway Tavern, so-named because it is midway between the towns of Effingham & Sigel on Route 45.  Aside from being in good practice, his memory was phenomenal.  He seemed to remember every piece he had ever learned.





 



ONLINE VIDEO AND AUDIO



Remarkably, there is video of Pappy himself, at age 90, playing Devil in the Haystack at the 1984 Illinois Traditional Music Awards concert at the Alder House, an arts center in Libertyville, Illinois: youtube.com/watch?v=wnYVFpNYqg...sp;     (Garry Harrison played with Pappy during the show, but isn’t seen on this particular video.)



The New Bad Habits, a band comprised of Chirps Smith, Dave Landreth, and Andy Gribble, played Devil in the Haystack on "Listen Up Illinois", a Public Access Televison show on UPTV in Urbana, Illinois, produced by Eddie Hawks.  In this clip, Chirps also tells of meeting and recording Pappy Taylor: youtube.com/watch?v=qdFdQ3InMkE



As noted above, the Indian Creek Delta Boys included Devil in the Haystack on their debut album.  That record has been re-released on CD (possibly available here:  tinyurl.com/pzadtxy) but the only online track I could find is a later one recorded by the band for Ray Alden and included on the 1995 “Young Fogies II” project:  tinyurl.com/qavnv7x



Other videos include:



A solo banjo version by Steve Rosen: youtube.com/watch?v=HiZG09Q5ikg



A solo fiddle version by Brian Scott: youtube.com/watch?v=aA_CiEIgKDE



[It wouldn’t be an old-time tune if there wasn’t a bit of confusion about the title.  In the two above examples the tune is referred to as Devil in the Strawstack in the video itself, and as Devil in the Haystack in the written information.  That should probably be considered more of a mistake than an actual alternate title; Brian Scott says as much in the caption to his video.  Pappy Taylor is the only source for the tune, and he always called it Devil in the Haystack.  There is a well-known, entirely different tune known as Devil in the Strawstack that comes to us from Tommy Jarrell, which might account for some of the confusion.  On a similar note, there is actually another old-time fiddler known as Pappy Taylor -  Ballard “Pappy” Taylor  (1908-1998), from Ashe County, North Carolina.]



A 2011 jam at Clifftop: youtube.com/watch?v=F7OAT8nJKCs



A 2011 jam in Petersburg, Virginia: youtube.com/watch?v=KJtO9DsuAjY



A 2008 jam in Vermont: youtube.com/watch?v=8-FP6D3kaA4



Other audio files include:



Group version featuring fiddle by Michael Diaz: tinyurl.com/puspgco



Solo fiddle by Tony Elder: tinyurl.com/pk2emsh



 



ADDITIONAL RECORDINGS



The Indian Creek Delta Boys recorded several times for Ray Alden, the founder of the Field Recorders Collective.  In 2008 the FRC released a CD of tracks taken from those sessions, one of which is Devil in the Haystack (possibly the same version included on the "Young Fogies II" project mentioned above). 



St. Louis based banjo player Dave Landreth included Devil in the Haystack on his 2000 album “Chairs”, a project on which several Illinois musicians – including Garry Harrison and Chirps Smith – appear, but  I was unable to find a recording of it online.  Dave is another musician with a strong interest in the music of southern Illinois – he has a “Midwest Banjo Tunes” Website and plays in The Vigortones with Chirps Smith and Jim Nelson,  a “no-nonsense, high energy trio who specialize in playing traditional dance tunes collected over the years from senior fiddlers in Southern Illinois and Missouri.”



Devil in the Haystack can also be found on the 2009 "Ernie Rocks" CD by the Gypsy Guerilla Band, a central Illinois group that plays an eclectic mix of old-time, Celtic, French, and Eastern European music.



(Both Dave Landreth and The Gypsy Guerilla band learned the tune from Bill Rintz, of Springfield, Illinois.  Soon after taking up the fiddle in 1976, Bill met the Indian Creek Delta Boys and, inspired by their field recording efforts, made his own trips to visit and learn from Pappy Taylor and other traditional Illinois fiddlers.)



 



TABLATURE



I found two banjo tabs online.



Cathy Moore has her version on her website: cathy-moore.com/banjo/tab/devi...k_tab.png



Dave Landreth has posted his version in the BanjoHangout tab archive: banjohangout.org/tab/browse.as...p;v=11969



As Cathy notes, Devil in the Haystack is in the key of A, but has a modal sound to it.  Both her tab and Dave’s are in A tuning (aEAC#E), while according to the liner notes for “The Indian Creek Delta Boys” the band used A-modal tuning (aEADE)



 



OTHER RESOURCES



The Chirps Smith account above is taken from a 1996 article in the Chicago Tribune: articles.chicagotribune.com/19...-reviewer



The FRC page devoted to the Indian Creek Delta Boys release includes a good overview of the band’s career: fieldrecorder.com/docs/notes/i...delta.htm .



The FRC site also has a page devoted to Chirps Smith, on which he documents his life and career in old-time music.  Included is an account of how the Indian Creek Delta Boys came to discover Pappy Taylor playing fiddle in a country band at the Midway Tap, a roadhouse just north of Effingham: fieldrecorder.com/docs/notes/chirps.htm



Steve Harrison has a website that includes pages devoted to Pappy Taylor (jonboatjournal.com/pappy.htm) and the Indian Creek Delta Boys (bidness.com/sh/collecting.htm ).



 



GARRY AND STEVE HARRISON



As most of you reading this Tune of the Week know, we sadly lost Garry Harrison last September, at the much too young age of 58.  His passing was a tremendous loss to the old-time community, and there is not much I can add to the thoughts and remembrances of Garry that can be found in many places, including the BanjoHangout thread from that time, except to say that we are all deeply indebted to him for his lifelong efforts to preserve and pass on so much wonderful music that might otherwise have been lost forever.



The same can, of course, be said of Garry’s brother Steve.  Several of my recent Tune of the Week selections have been, like Devil in the Haystack, not especially well-known, and when researching such tunes I am often struck by how close they came to not getting passed along to the next generation.  The thread connecting them from a musician of Pappy’s era to one, say, competing in the youth category at Clifftop this year is often very slender.  Just how slender might be best illustrated by another story from Steve Harrison, in this case about a thread that was broken:



One thing that my late brother Garry and I agonized about was a closing scene at Jesse James Abbott's house. We had a nice and productive session with Jesse, and had already loaded all the recording equipment into the trunk of the car and came back in to say our goodbyes. With one foot out the door headed back out to the car, Jesse just off the cuff said, "Yeah, by golly, next time I'll play that "Wild Ponys of the West" for you." I looked at Garry, he looked at me, both shook our heads -- never heard him even mention that tune title before. Looked at the trunk of the car... nah. We don't want to wear him out and it'd take a good 10-15 minutes to get all that set back up again, so we let Jesse know that we would be VERY interested in hearing him play Wild Ponys of the West and that we'd check in with him later that week to see if it'd be convenient for him and his family to allow us another sit-to. Well Jesse just up and died about two days later from a massive coronary. Garry liked to speculate in humor that Jesse just wanted to let us know that he was taking one with him. 'Course, Jesse didn't have anything like that in mind, but it just goes to show, you ain't gonna get 'em all.



As much as Wild Ponys of the West is now going to haunt my “lost fiddle tune” dreams, the more positive and important reaction that anecdote is to be very thankful for all the tunes that have been saved.  So often that has been through the efforts of just one person, or a small group of people, working on their own time and their own dime, doing it all just for the love of the music and the musicians.  In the case of southern Illinois fiddle music, Garry and Steve Harrison and the others in the Indian Creek Delta Boys circle preserved hundreds of tunes from dozens of fiddlers, forever enriching the old-time repertoire.  I am grateful that, because of them, I have been able to hear, learn, and play Devil in the Haystack.



On a more personal note, I am very grateful to Steve for the help he gave to me with this Tune of the Week write-up.  After I contacted him just a few days ago, he not only steered me to several resources and allowed me to use content from his website, he also sent me a long email describing his experiences with his brother recording Pappy and other Illinois musicians in the 1970s and 80s, only part of which is excerpted above.  And he did all that during a very hectic week in which he was moving from one state to another.  This Tune of the Week wouldn’t really have been possible without his generous assistance.



 



 



Edited by - EggerRidgeBoy on 08/22/2013 12:25:12

Brooklynbanjoboy - Posted - 05/24/2013:  12:57:25


Nicely done write up.



Here is the link to Cathy Moore's tab:



cathy-moore.com/banjo/tab/devi...k_tab.png



V/R,



Lew


stigandr5 - Posted - 05/24/2013:  15:08:16


My dad's side of the family is all from Effingham County. Wish I'd gotten the chance to hear Pappy Taylor play. Thanks for choosing this tune!


hendrid - Posted - 05/24/2013:  17:17:33


To see Pappy Taylor play see EggerRidgeBoy's first youtube video above.


J-Walk - Posted - 05/24/2013:  18:14:11


Dude, that could be a doctoral dissertation! Nice work. 



I have three recordings of that tune, and I've noticed any of them. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. 


Tamarack - Posted - 05/25/2013:  07:28:45


A great tune and a great writeup -- not too difficult to play for us back porch hacks.



Very heartening to hear a Midwest tune for those of us who are Hopelessly Midwestern*  (I have Indiana and Illinois roots and have spent most of my life in Michigan, with sojourns in Ohio and Missouri)



 



* For those who haven't heard Joel Mabus' song of this title, I highly recommend it.


banjoannie - Posted - 05/25/2013:  08:02:59


Vary cool I'm on it.

JanetB - Posted - 05/25/2013:  14:22:06


It's going to take me all weekend to read the above, but so far it's all interesting, Brett.  Thanks for so much new information and for a good tune.  It reminds me a bit of June Apple.  I really liked the video of Pappy Taylor as a 90-year old fiddler.  Amazing!




Devil in the Haystack

   

EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  13:43:30


quote:

Originally posted by Brooklynbanjoboy

 

Nicely done write up.



Here is the link to Cathy Moore's tab:



cathy-moore.com/banjo/tab/devi...k_tab.png



V/R,



Lew






 Thanks.  Not sure how that link ended up being the one to the Tribune article, but I have corrected it in the post.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  13:49:11


quote:

Originally posted by stigandr5

 

My dad's side of the family is all from Effingham County. Wish I'd gotten the chance to hear Pappy Taylor play. Thanks for choosing this tune!






Glad you enjoyed the tune!



I lived in that area of Illinois for a couple of years in the mid-60s, and we continued to visit friends and family there for years after we moved away. If I had been more seriously into old-time music during my teenage years I might even have gotten to see Pappy and the Indian Creek Delta Boys in the late 70s.  But I am glad that he was so extensively recorded, and even videotaped, so I can enjoy his music now.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  13:52:45


quote:

Originally posted by J-Walk

 

Dude, that could be a doctoral dissertation! Nice work. 



I have three recordings of that tune, and I've noticed any of them. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. 






Having read a doctoral dissertation or two in my time, I realize that isn't always necessarily a compliment - so thanks for the "nice work".  :-)



That happens to me quite often when I discover a tune, whether through a Tune of the Week write-up or somewhere else - I put it on my "to buy" list and then realize I have a version (or versions) of it already in my collection.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  13:59:22


quote:

Originally posted by Tamarack

 

A great tune and a great writeup -- not too difficult to play for us back porch hacks.



Very heartening to hear a Midwest tune for those of us who are Hopelessly Midwestern*  (I have Indiana and Illinois roots and have spent most of my life in Michigan, with sojourns in Ohio and Missouri)



 



* For those who haven't heard Joel Mabus' song of this title, I highly recommend it.






Thanks - glad you enjoyed the tune and the write-up.



I am from Ohio and have deep family roots in the state, but I have also lived in Illinois and have strong personal and family connections to Wisconsin and Michigan, so I am very interested in old-time fiddle and banjo tunes from the Midwest.  There is obviously a wealth of wonderful music from the Appalachian region, but I really enjoy discovering lesser known tunes from my part of the country.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  14:00:56


quote:

Originally posted by JanetB

 

It's going to take me all weekend to read the above, but so far it's all interesting, Brett.  Thanks for so much new information and for a good tune.  It reminds me a bit of June Apple.  I really liked the video of Pappy Taylor as a 90-year old fiddler.  Amazing!






I hope you're enjoying working your way through it, Janet - you should see the stuff I left out!  :-)



Yes, that is great video of Pappy, still sounding pretty good at 90.



Thanks for posting your version!



 



Edited by - EggerRidgeBoy on 05/27/2013 14:03:05

JanetB - Posted - 05/27/2013:  15:21:43


I've read more of the above write-up and it's mighty interesting.  I found out the book Dear Old Illinois with its 750 downstate Illinois tunes is nearly impossible to get.  Also that Lynn Chirps Smith is the same fiddler who Rhys Jones sites as his friend and mentor.  Rhys is a big promoter of midwestern fiddle tunes and now I know of the great Pappy Taylor, too.  What I wondered about is why Illinois is considered the "midwest."  To me, it's the "mideast," but that would now mean somewhere by the Mediterranean.  It must have something to do with its relative western location during our nation's first hundred years.



Here's the tab I made listening to Pappy.  If it helps anyone I'm glad to keep posting these on TOTW.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/27/2013:  16:52:05


quote:

Originally posted by JanetB

 

I've read more of the above write-up and it's mighty interesting.  I found out the book Dear Old Illinois with its 750 downstate Illinois tunes is nearly impossible to get.  Also that Lynn Chirps Smith is the same fiddler who Rhys Jones sites as his friend and mentor.  Rhys is a big promoter of midwestern fiddle tunes and now I know of the great Pappy Taylor, too.  What I wondered about is why Illinois is considered the "midwest."  To me, it's the "mideast," but that would now mean somewhere by the Mediterranean.  It must have something to do with its relative western location during our nation's first hundred years.



Here's the tab I made listening to Pappy.  If it helps anyone I'm glad to keep posting these on TOTW.






Glad you are still enjoying the write-up, Janet.



Yes, the "Dear Old Illinois" set is unfortunately out-of-print, even though it was only published six years ago.  And the fact that it is so recent a publication makes it very hard to find a used set, since - understandably -  nobody who bought it when it came out is ready to part with it yet. I did find some folks on the FiddleHangout who are willing to burn copies of the three CDs for those interested, so you might try posting over there if you would like the CDs.



I know what you mean about Illinois being "mideast".  I grew up in Ohio, and have always thought of it as the "midwest", because that is what everyone around here calls it.  When my sister moved to California years ago, she kept getting corrected when she referred to Ohio as the midwest.  To those on the west coast, Ohio is basically on the east coast, bordering as it does Pennsylvania.  And obviously any glance at the map shows that Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, etc., aren't close to the middle of the country, let alone the western middle.  But as you suggest, it is very much a matter of history and culture.  Ohio, Illinois, and the rest of the Great Lake states were the western frontier in the mid-and-late 1700s.  Or more accurately, the northwest frontier, thus the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, which guided the settlement of the region.  After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, Illinois was probably pretty close to being right in the "midwest" of the country, but as the country expanded to the Pacific in the next decades it became, geographically, solidly in the "mideast".



But now it has more to do with culture than geography.  I have lived in Illinois, Ohio, and Washington, DC, and I have family in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Boston.  Whatever you call them, the states of the old Northwest Territory are definitely not "eastern", if that definition includes the east coast.



Edited by - EggerRidgeBoy on 05/27/2013 16:54:33

JanetB - Posted - 05/27/2013:  17:16:31


Thanks for the history reminders, Brett.  American history is fascinating.



 



I forgot the tab above.




Devil in the Haystack tab

   

Brooklynbanjoboy - Posted - 05/28/2013:  15:17:07


Great write up.  Great playing from BHO friends.



Here's my crack at it:



youtube.com/watch?v=txdPdgBGDLk



Play hard,



Lew



 


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/29/2013:  17:12:46


quote:

Originally posted by JanetB

 

Thanks for the history reminders, Brett.  American history is fascinating.



 



I forgot the tab above.






History is one of my other main amateur interests - I like to ramble on about it almost as much as I do about, say, fiddle tunes from Illinois.  :-)



(Speaking of American history, I highly recommend the book "American Nations", one of the best books on the subject that I have read recently.)



Thanks very much for the tablature.  In answer to the question in your earlier post, I really appreciate the TOTW tabs that you post - it really helps me to see how others have come up with their own version of a tune (it is still pretty hard for me to do that by ear alone).


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/29/2013:  17:15:01


quote:

Originally posted by Brooklynbanjoboy

 

Great write up.  Great playing from BHO friends.



Here's my crack at it:



youtube.com/watch?v=txdPdgBGDLk



Play hard,



Lew



 






Thanks, Lew.  And thanks for posting your version.


PIME - Posted - 05/30/2013:  12:53:57


I've mostly been lurking on Banjo Hangout, as my interest in the banjo far exceeds any attempts to actually *play*.  But I'm another Midwesterner (originally from the Ludington area, north of Grand Rapids - Hi, Tamarack!)  and really appreciate the background and information! 



The history and the people are actually more interesting to me than the tabs and such -- so the image of "making" a tune is a powerful one....  thanks for the info, EggerRidgeBoy


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 05/30/2013:  16:33:38


quote:

Originally posted by PIME

 

I've mostly been lurking on Banjo Hangout, as my interest in the banjo far exceeds any attempts to actually *play*.  But I'm another Midwesterner (originally from the Ludington area, north of Grand Rapids - Hi, Tamarack!)  and really appreciate the background and information! 



The history and the people are actually more interesting to me than the tabs and such -- so the image of "making" a tune is a powerful one....  thanks for the info, EggerRidgeBoy






Thanks for the comment, PIME - and for "unlurking".  Welcome to the Hangout.  I, too, was a lurker-then-member a few years before I actually bought a banjo and started learning.  So start saving up for that first banjo now!



I'm also glad to see that Devil in the Haystack has brought one more Midwestern old-time music enthusiast out of the woodwork.  :-)


Landreth - Posted - 08/15/2013:  19:24:46


Very nice job and a good discussion.

C Nyal de Kaye - Posted - 08/15/2013:  21:19:44


Thanks for all the effort involved in posting this ERB.



There's many, many hours of work there for a relatively small audience.



So I just want to say "Thank you."


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 08/22/2013:  11:43:57


quote:

Originally posted by Landreth

 

Very nice job and a good discussion.







 



Thanks, Dave - I'm glad you enjoyed it.


EggerRidgeBoy - Posted - 08/22/2013:  11:47:37


quote:

Originally posted by C Nyal de Kaye

 

Thanks for all the effort involved in posting this ERB.




There's many, many hours of work there for a relatively small audience.




So I just want to say "Thank you."







You're welcome, C Nyal - thanks for posting.  It does represent a good deal of time and effort, but fortunately I like doing such research.  And even though the audience is relatively small, I figure that in this era of Internet search engines, it can serve as a resource for others down the line somewhere, who may be looking for information on Pappy or Devil in the Haystack.


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