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Jun 20, 2024 - 7:33:44 PM
1898 posts since 4/13/2017

I've been browsing on here about ways others have turned rims on their lathes, and this false jaw deal has intrigued me.

banjohangout.org/archive/193548

I'm assuming that the false jaws, once removed and replaced, are no longer accurate and must be "re-turned"? If so, I'm assuming that they must be replaced every so often, and if not, then how do they get re-mounted in an accurate fashion?

Jun 20, 2024 - 8:48:50 PM

809 posts since 7/10/2012

I use a set of cauls on my lathe that are similar to Dan's, but not for turning the OD and ID, only for sanding. For the initial turning, I use wood disks that are raised on the edge and the center with a recess in between. I screw the rim to the raised edge from the back of the disk into the rim edge and cut the OD and ID so the thickness is the same all around, then remove the rim, add the rim caps on both sides, route it flush, and use the cauls to sand. The trick is to cut the OD and ID without removing the rim from the lathe, once you remove the rim from the disk, or the cauls in the linked example, you are correct that it will never be exactly centered on the same plane. You have one shot to get that right.

Jun 20, 2024 - 9:12:13 PM

RB3

USA

2048 posts since 4/12/2004

You might want to take a look at the technique of "boring soft jaws" on a lathe. It's a method used on metal lathes to achieve improved concentricity and part purchase. I would expect that the same method could be adapted for turning wooden components, such as banjo rims.

Below is a link to a YouTube video that provides a brief demonstration of the technique. Many other more involved demonstration videos of the technique are also available on YouTube.

Boring Soft Jaws

Jun 21, 2024 - 2:07:40 PM
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rmcdow

USA

1412 posts since 11/8/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Lemon Banjo and Supply

I've been browsing on here about ways others have turned rims on their lathes, and this false jaw deal has intrigued me.

banjohangout.org/archive/193548

I'm assuming that the false jaws, once removed and replaced, are no longer accurate and must be "re-turned"? If so, I'm assuming that they must be replaced every so often, and if not, then how do they get re-mounted in an accurate fashion?


This Vicmarc chuck fixture works great, is adjustable, repeatable, clamps the work well, and is mounted on a 4" wood chuck.  It comes in a couple of sizes. 

 https://woodturnerscatalog.com/products/vicmarc-14-inch-adjusta-jaw-set?_pos=1&_sid=9799bd8ed&_ss=r


Edited by - rmcdow on 06/21/2024 14:10:44

Jun 22, 2024 - 5:12:26 AM

2535 posts since 2/7/2008

As for remounting the jaws accurately, I just number mine.

Each of the jaws on my lathe chuck has a number and the numbered each of the false jaws.

I have the Vicmarc Adjust-a-jaw fixture like the one Rives has and I attach my blocks to that.

You definitely want to use a face mask when turning with these. And maybe a catchers chest protector.

I think the better solution for one-offs may be a sacrificial piece of ply attached to a faceplate. The rim blank is glued to the ply and parted off after the inside and outside are turned.

Also, a piece of brown paper can be put between the glue joint and it will separate at the paper. But then you have to sand off the residual paper and it seems just as easy to part it off on the lathe.

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