Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

918
Banjo Lovers Online


Jun 15, 2024 - 4:25:07 PM
likes this

Kellie

USA

229 posts since 1/19/2018

I'm curious if there is one. I know classic banjo is more akin to playing the classical guitar. So what is the difference between Scruggs style and classic style? How do you angle the hand or what angle do you use on the thumb to hit the strings?

Edited by - Kellie on 06/15/2024 16:25:31

Jun 15, 2024 - 7:42:14 PM

6111 posts since 3/6/2006
Online Now

Scruggs players wear picks. That really changes everything.

Edited by - Laurence Diehl on 06/15/2024 19:42:43

Jun 15, 2024 - 9:52:05 PM

8359 posts since 9/21/2007

“Classical guitar” generally refers to the academic version of Spanish guitar quantified by Segovia in the 1920s with a hand form fingering system different from the common style of guitar playing before Segovia. The major defining factor is the exclusive use of fingernails and an unsupported hand, which only really became common after nylon strings were introduced post WW2.

What we call “classic banjo” today shares many techniques with pre Segovia Spanish guitar which can be found in tutors such as Carcassi, Foden, Bickford, Weidt, etc., but is still unique to the banjo. It was common for classic era banjoist to also play (and teach) Spanish guitar.

As far as right hand, beyond some basic rules such as fingertips only and keeping the thumb well advanced, there is little in specific rules (outside of alternate fingering). Anchor or not as it depends on the teacher. Notable “do not anchor” players were Frank Converse, Albert Baur, Joe Morley and I am sure others.

Generally and most common was the recommendation to lightly rest the little finger on the head for support (much like pre Segovia guitar playing).

My advice would be, instead of asking on the bluegrass forum, read the section on hand position in all the available banjo tutors and work up your own understanding. I’ve made this info as accessible as possible through the internet archive for this very reason.

The structure of bluegrass, using Hawaiian guitar picks, is pretty easy to learn about on YouTube.

Jun 15, 2024 - 10:21:10 PM

Kellie

USA

229 posts since 1/19/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks

“Classical guitar” generally refers to the academic version of Spanish guitar quantified by Segovia in the 1920s with a hand form fingering system different from the common style of guitar playing before Segovia. The major defining factor is the exclusive use of fingernails and an unsupported hand, which only really became common after nylon strings were introduced post WW2.

What we call “classic banjo” today shares many techniques with pre Segovia Spanish guitar which can be found in tutors such as Carcassi, Foden, Bickford, Weidt, etc., but is still unique to the banjo. It was common for classic era banjoist to also play (and teach) Spanish guitar.

As far as right hand, beyond some basic rules such as fingertips only and keeping the thumb well advanced, there is little in specific rules (outside of alternate fingering). Anchor or not as it depends on the teacher. Notable “do not anchor” players were Frank Converse, Albert Baur, Joe Morley and I am sure others.

Generally and most common was the recommendation to lightly rest the little finger on the head for support (much like pre Segovia guitar playing).

My advice would be, instead of asking on the bluegrass forum, read the section on hand position in all the available banjo tutors and work up your own understanding. I’ve made this info as accessible as possible through the internet archive for this very reason.

The structure of bluegrass, using Hawaiian guitar picks, is pretty easy to learn about on YouTube.


My bad. I did read up on quite a few banjo tutors though. I'm just wondering because proper technique is key to speed as well as time.

Jun 16, 2024 - 4:24:11 AM
Players Union Member

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

30321 posts since 8/3/2003

Kellie, there is no "one way fits all" when it comes to hand/finger placement. What works for me wouldn't work for a man with bigger hands and vice versa. You can get a general idea of how your wrist/hand/fingers should be placed, but then it's up to you to work out what is best for you.

No short cuts, just trial, error and practice, practice, practice.

Jun 16, 2024 - 4:26:15 AM

735 posts since 5/21/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Kellie

I'm curious if there is one. I know classic banjo is more akin to playing the classical guitar. So what is the difference between Scruggs style and classic style? How do you angle the hand or what angle do you use on the thumb to hit the strings?


Scruggs Style Banjo

 

 

Classic Style Banjo

 

Jun 16, 2024 - 10:25:20 AM

6111 posts since 3/6/2006
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks



The structure of bluegrass, using Hawaiian guitar picks, is pretty easy to learn about on YouTube.


I guess if I was playing Hawaiian guitar I might call them that but on this banjo forum they are just picks. For the last century or so anyway. . 

Jun 16, 2024 - 12:44:44 PM

chuckv97

Canada

72278 posts since 10/5/2013

I like the Joel Sweeney 5th string invention,,,just a few years ago, no?

Jun 16, 2024 - 12:58:01 PM
likes this

6111 posts since 3/6/2006
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

I like the Joel Sweeney 5th string invention,,,just a few years ago, no?


Don't come at me with your new-fangled ideas, grasshopper.

Jun 16, 2024 - 1:05:45 PM

chuckv97

Canada

72278 posts since 10/5/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Laurence Diehl
quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

I like the Joel Sweeney 5th string invention,,,just a few years ago, no?


Don't come at me with your new-fangled ideas, grasshopper.


I believe you have me confused with a certain Sonny Osborne who had a brainstorm for a 6-string banjo.... 

Jun 16, 2024 - 3:38:13 PM

Fathand

Canada

12398 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Laurence Diehl
quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks



The structure of bluegrass, using Hawaiian guitar picks, is pretty easy to learn about on YouTube.


I guess if I was playing Hawaiian guitar I might call them that but on this banjo forum they are just picks. For the last century or so anyway. . 


Weren't finger picks used to play the Sitar and Portuguese guitar long before the Hawaiian guitar?

Jun 16, 2024 - 4:14:26 PM
likes this

6111 posts since 3/6/2006
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Fathand
quote:
Originally posted by Laurence Diehl
quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks



The structure of bluegrass, using Hawaiian guitar picks, is pretty easy to learn about on YouTube.


I guess if I was playing Hawaiian guitar I might call them that but on this banjo forum they are just picks. For the last century or so anyway. . 


Weren't finger picks used to play the Sitar and Portuguese guitar long before the Hawaiian guitar?


Hmmm...this could be a good topic for its own thread. 
A car used to be called a horseless carriage but I know my local Ford dealer would be confused by that. Which is why I prefer to call things by their generally accepted contemporary names. 
ok I'm done. This is way off topic. 

Jun 16, 2024 - 4:24:25 PM

79839 posts since 5/9/2007

Aldo Ray played a nice Hawaiian style.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Privacy Consent
Copyright 2024 Banjo Hangout. All Rights Reserved.





Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.2421875