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Jun 13, 2024 - 10:05:43 AM
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6119 posts since 3/6/2006

One more selection on muted banjo. I almost had it but ugh - that bridge!


Jun 13, 2024 - 11:23:14 AM
Players Union Member

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

30328 posts since 8/3/2003

Very interesting sound. I like it! Also like the tune. Thanks for posting.

Jun 13, 2024 - 1:35:18 PM

15753 posts since 10/30/2008

You're playing a very 4 string plectrum banjo style there. Nicely done. I didn't notice you playing the 5th string...

Jun 13, 2024 - 2:44:56 PM
Players Union Member

Emiel

Austria

10451 posts since 1/22/2003

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

You're playing a very 4 string plectrum banjo style there. Nicely done. I didn't notice you playing the 5th string...


Well, plectrum banjo style uses a plectrum (flatpick). As long as you're playing finger-style/finger-picking, you can use the 5-string banjo, no need to use a plectrum banjo. There are styles of 5-string banjo that don't make much use of the 5th string. E.g., Charley Poole… 

Jun 13, 2024 - 5:51:24 PM

6119 posts since 3/6/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

Very interesting sound. I like it! Also like the tune. Thanks for posting.


Thanks Sherry. 

Jun 13, 2024 - 5:52:52 PM

6119 posts since 3/6/2006

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

You're playing a very 4 string plectrum banjo style there. Nicely done. I didn't notice you playing the 5th string...


True I could have played it on plectrum except I'm not a fan of C tuning. 

Jun 13, 2024 - 5:56:35 PM

6119 posts since 3/6/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Emiel
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

You're playing a very 4 string plectrum banjo style there. Nicely done. I didn't notice you playing the 5th string...


Well, plectrum banjo style uses a plectrum (flatpick). As long as you're playing finger-style/finger-picking, you can use the 5-string banjo, no need to use a plectrum banjo. There are styles of 5-string banjo that don't make much use of the 5th string. E.g., Charley Poole… 


True. Charlie liked C tuning so plectrum would have been a natural for him. Probably not going over in North Carolina though. 

Jun 14, 2024 - 4:24:05 AM
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banjopaolo

Italy

1925 posts since 11/6/2008

Beautiful Laurence! Not so close to Carlie Poole style but great playing ….

Maybe you should try to get a resophonic instrument with a five string banjo neck, that muted sound is not so far from reso sound

Jun 14, 2024 - 9:41:54 AM
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6119 posts since 3/6/2006

quote:
Originally posted by banjopaolo

Beautiful Laurence! Not so close to Carlie Poole style but great playing ….

Maybe you should try to get a resophonic instrument with a five string banjo neck, that muted sound is not so far from reso sound


Thank you Paolo! Yes - Charlie Poole didn't play this one smiley!

The mute can make things sound a bit weird (and a bit like a reso, as you say) but it's the only way to get a bit more sustain and control over the instrument. More guitar-like really.

Jun 19, 2024 - 4:52:33 PM

270 posts since 9/6/2016

Boy, that was nice! One of the most important compositions in jazz history: Charlie Parker famously practiced the tune incessantly in all 12 keys during his woodshed period, after being embarrassed at a jam session. So, in a way, we have this Ray Noble standard to thank for spurring the development of bebop and beyond.

It’s great hearing it done on banjo. It really works well on the instrument, certainly in your hands.

But now I have to go back and listen to the first version I heard, by Clifford Brown, and try to adapt it to the tenor…

Jun 19, 2024 - 5:59:52 PM
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6119 posts since 3/6/2006

quote:
Originally posted by L50EF15

Boy, that was nice! One of the most important compositions in jazz history: Charlie Parker famously practiced the tune incessantly in all 12 keys during his woodshed period, after being embarrassed at a jam session. So, in a way, we have this Ray Noble standard to thank for spurring the development of bebop and beyond.

It’s great hearing it done on banjo. It really works well on the instrument, certainly in your hands.

But now I have to go back and listen to the first version I heard, by Clifford Brown, and try to adapt it to the tenor…


Thanks Rudy! Yes, this tune has quite a pedigree. I think my favorite version is actually by Joe Pass, on a record with Herb Ellis. He did a kind of swing version where he slowed it down enough that mere mortals could hear how he played over the changes. Beautiful stuff. 

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