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May 24, 2024 - 6:59:23 AM
41242 posts since 3/5/2008

Make ..Heat..?

Thinking the Earths core...

May 24, 2024 - 7:42:49 AM
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RB3

USA

2025 posts since 4/12/2004

From a thermodynamic perspective, the phrase "make heat" doesn't make a lot of sense. The definition of "heat" that I learned when I studied thermodynamics a long time ago is that heat is energy in transit across a system boundary due to a difference in temperature between the system and its surroundings.

If you can use gravity to cause the temperature of some system to become higher than its surroundings, you would create a situation that would facilitate a transfer of heat, so, in that respect, I suppose you could say that you used gravity to "make heat".

May 24, 2024 - 8:04:50 AM

12768 posts since 8/22/2006

Don’t forget that pressure also contributes to the heat produced in the Earths core. Oh oh ok folks get out your tin foil hats I have suddenly realize why the push for carbon capture and store it under ground.

Dang liizid people.
I figured it out.
What are diamonds made of and how are they formed?

Sons of Beaches want us to give up willing our diamonds. Or at least the stuff that make diamonds...

Protect our carbon resist liizid peoples. Diamonds are a girl’s best friend not liizid peoples’s.

May 24, 2024 - 8:05:52 AM

chuckv97

Canada

72107 posts since 10/5/2013

A perpetual motion pump Jack-type of equipment runs by gravitational forces,, it could run a generator to produce electricity for heat, , , or not? Just thinking out loud,, must’ve been already done, you’d think.

May 24, 2024 - 8:48:28 AM

Buddur

USA

3934 posts since 10/23/2004

Maybe.

May 24, 2024 - 9:41:57 AM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

13802 posts since 2/22/2007

Wayne, what is the difference between "heat" and "temperature?" I thought that the latter just measured the former?

May 24, 2024 - 9:51:33 AM

Owen

Canada

15162 posts since 6/5/2011

I've heard/read that the earth has stronger gravity than does the moon and that the earth has [or has absorbed or gained, or ??] more heat than the moon, ergo ...............  .   

[Boy, I'm sure glad that topics I can make a significant contribution to pop up now and then.  wink ]

Edited by - Owen on 05/24/2024 09:52:47

May 24, 2024 - 9:58:02 AM

79702 posts since 5/9/2007

Gravity encourages friction and friction builds heat.
The earth is a spinning mass that is not a solid object itself.
There are liquid layers and solid areas that move against each other under unthinkable pressures.

Lots of friction and stored fuels.

May 24, 2024 - 10:42:09 AM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

13802 posts since 2/22/2007

Enough gravity will supposedly eventually collapse all matter into one giant black hole. It will contain all of the heat in the universe, but since heat cannot escape it I'm not sure if you would call it "hot" or "cold?"

May 24, 2024 - 11:26 AM

5031 posts since 9/12/2016

as children-we had a 150 lb anvil and a big sledge hammer probably above 10 lbs--we would put a steel hex nut 0n the anvil and come down hard with the sledge --this would flatten it and it would be warmed --after one hit me in the shin--I lost intrest

compressing molecules together makes the area hotter which --this is the basis of AC-

Edited by - Tractor1 on 05/24/2024 11:30:12

May 24, 2024 - 12:05:39 PM

79702 posts since 5/9/2007

We had a machine at SMVTI that pulled bolts and pieces of steel (or anything) apart,registering the pounds needed and watching the middle of the bolt turn bright red just before separation.
Numbers over 100,000 pounds were seen on the big dial.

May 24, 2024 - 12:58:08 PM

41242 posts since 3/5/2008

What is the relationship between gravity n weight..?

May 24, 2024 - 2:01:29 PM
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slammer

USA

4547 posts since 12/30/2008

I miss read this and thought it said gravy!!! Can’t ever have too much gravy!!!
Slammer!!!

May 24, 2024 - 2:02:27 PM
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slammer

USA

4547 posts since 12/30/2008

I could explain the relationship between gravy and my weight!!!
Slammer!!!

May 24, 2024 - 3:14:03 PM
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7690 posts since 7/24/2013

quote:
Originally posted by STUD figmo Al

What is the relationship between gravity n weight..?


Weight = Mass*gravity (gravity being measured as the acceleration of gravity) in earth this is 9.8 meter per second squared. The moon acceleration of gravity is something like 1.5 meters per second. Hence, you weigh less on the moon. 

May 24, 2024 - 3:17:42 PM
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7690 posts since 7/24/2013

Gravity can create friction which creates heat, among a myriad of other ways that gravity can indirectly influence temperature but gravity on stable objects (a book on a table) will not create heat.

Edited by - South Jersey Mike on 05/24/2024 15:18:02

May 24, 2024 - 3:29:06 PM

41242 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by South Jersey Mike
quote:
Originally posted by STUD figmo Al

What is the relationship between gravity n weight..?


Weight = Mass*gravity (gravity being measured as the acceleration of gravity) in earth this is 9.8 meter per second squared. The moon acceleration of gravity is something like 1.5 meters per second. Hence, you weigh less on the moon. 

 


That is good info but not what i am looking for..as an answer..

How dose gravity effect weight..

I get the mass part..

 

It pulls harder on more mass..?

 

For that matter dose gravity actually..pull.?

Edited by - STUD figmo Al on 05/24/2024 15:30:07

May 24, 2024 - 3:34:26 PM

41242 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by South Jersey Mike

Gravity can create friction which creates heat, among a myriad of other ways that gravity can indirectly influence temperature but gravity on stable objects (a book on a table) will not create heat.


Cool..

But what if one could find a way to..

Increase..gravity it's self..?

 

Oppozit of anti gravity..

N..would anti gravity cause ..cooling..?

May 24, 2024 - 4:11:07 PM

banjoT1

Canada

77 posts since 7/18/2019

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

What Are Black Holes?

A black hole is an astronomical object with a GRAVITATIONAL PULL so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape it.
……… astronomers have been studying black holes through the various forms of light they emit for decades. Although light can’t escape a black hole’s event horizon, the enormous tidal forces in its vicinity cause nearby matter to.....

HEAT UP TO MILLIONS OF DEGREES

.....and emit radio waves and X-rays.

Some of the material orbiting even closer to the event horizon may be hurled out, forming jets of particles moving near the speed of light that emit radio, X-rays and gamma rays. Jets from supermassive black holes can extend hundreds of thousands of light-years into space.

NASA.gov/universe/what-are-bla...20X-rays.

May 25, 2024 - 3:28:28 AM

3880 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by STUD figmo Al

 

It pulls harder on more mass..?

For that matter dose gravity actually..pull.?


Well some folks say  gravity sucks.

Objects with different mass fall to Earth at same rate.

Does it actually "pull"?

As per what Einstein figured in General Theory of Relativity, gravity is not a force, so can't be pulling you. If you walked off a tall building; you are really just taking away the normal force that was pushing you up (accelerating up at 9.8 M/S²); you would not experience a force pulling you down... but in free fall, weightlessness; and would be in in an inertial frame of reference (not gravitational); thus could make no distinction between being in completely empty flat space, where there is no gravity.

"pulls harder on more mass..?" Same with any objects with different mass in free fall, appear to fall at same rate because they are not accelerating... it's the earth that's accelerating toward the objects (9.8 M/S²). Objects are just following the same curvature through space time until something stops them (might sting and leave a mark).

How we perceive gravity has to do with inertial reference frame within spacetime curvature; can be bit of a mind benders.

Edited by - banjoak on 05/25/2024 03:32:12

May 25, 2024 - 5:22:20 AM

41242 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by banjoak
quote:
Originally posted by STUD figmo Al

 

It pulls harder on more mass..?

For that matter dose gravity actually..pull.?


Well some folks say  gravity sucks.

Objects with different mass fall to Earth at same rate.

Does it actually "pull"?

As per what Einstein figured in General Theory of Relativity, gravity is not a force, so can't be pulling you. If you walked off a tall building; you are really just taking away the normal force that was pushing you up (accelerating up at 9.8 M/S²); you would not experience a force pulling you down... but in free fall, weightlessness; and would be in in an inertial frame of reference (not gravitational); thus could make no distinction between being in completely empty flat space, where there is no gravity.

"pulls harder on more mass..?" Same with any objects with different mass in free fall, appear to fall at same rate because they are not accelerating... it's the earth that's accelerating toward the objects (9.8 M/S²). Objects are just following the same curvature through space time until something stops them (might sting and leave a mark).

How we perceive gravity has to do with inertial reference frame within spacetime curvature; can be bit of a mind benders.


Thankyou..

 

It is interesting..

I understood ..(correctly or  incorrectly..)

That gravity..was a force that attracted a center of an object to another center of an object..

Where..mass mattered..

Gravity is an interesting concept..

 

I also like magnitisum..n how it works..

But...really only understand ..what it dose..

 

Another interesting subject..atleast to me..are frequintcys..n..there affects..

May 25, 2024 - 5:39:18 AM

79702 posts since 5/9/2007

"Pull" is just another word for "Push".

May 25, 2024 - 6:00:50 AM

3880 posts since 10/17/2009

Mass still matters.

As a measure of it's inertia still applies... that is it's natural tendency to resist change in it's state of motion. The greater mass, the greater it's inertia.

The spacetime curvature geometries is caused by relative interaction between physical bodies with mass; and energy... and as well the motion of mass and energy is affected by the curvature of spacetime.

Just in reply to question about "if gravity actually pulls" - giving simplified description of how Einstein explained it. (perhaps over-simplification?)

 

On earth, Newton...  gravity as a force, works just fine.

F = Gm1m2/r2,
where F is the force due to gravity, between two masses (m1 and m2), which are a distance r apart; G is the gravitational constant.

Edited by - banjoak on 05/25/2024 06:12:24

May 25, 2024 - 6:15:03 AM
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RB3

USA

2025 posts since 4/12/2004

banjo bill-e,

Temperature is an index of internal energy, heat is the transfer of energy between two bodies, due to a difference in temperature between the two bodies.

May 25, 2024 - 6:38:26 AM

RB3

USA

2025 posts since 4/12/2004

Gravity is the attractive force between the Earth and a body residing on the Earth. That gravitational force associated with the body is referred to as the weight of the body. That force/weight is proportional to the product of the mass of the Earth and the mass of the body and inversely proportional to the square of distance between the Earth and the body.

May 25, 2024 - 6:51:21 AM

41242 posts since 3/5/2008

Ok...
Nother question..

If i fire a bullet..at a steel gong..
1...is there a gravintaional..(pull)..between the steel gong n the bullet..even if it is super small?
2...the bullet..is propelled by powder at the steel gong..
Is the..(pull)..increased..?
Remain the same..?
Or posahbility..relaxed?

I understand..that the energy of the powder..over comes the..(pull)..of gravity of objects in the opozit direction.

Also..the ..(pull) of gravity..effects the bullet as soon as it leaves the barrel..
Towards the earth..

Am i thinking about this incorrectly?

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