Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

299
Banjo Lovers Online


Apr 28, 2024 - 3:27:39 AM
likes this
348 posts since 11/4/2009

A nice little Joe Daniels in for restoration. 10 1/2" pot 25 3/4" scale length. As yet I'm unsure of it's age. Serial number: 5897








Apr 28, 2024 - 3:46:38 AM

1988 posts since 4/25/2007

Very nice John I'd guess early 1900's.

Apr 28, 2024 - 3:50:33 PM

banjonz

New Zealand

12088 posts since 6/29/2003

Performer, composer, arranger and teacher of the banjo, Joe Daniels (whose real name was Joseph Toledano) established a studio at 28 Bishopsgate Street, London, in 1870 and, after a few years, moved to 112 Leadenhall Street where lie started to advertise himself as "Musical Instrument Maker" and teacher of the banjo, mandolin and guitar - in addition to Stage dancing. In 1887 he took out a patent for a metal casing (or "sound box") round the banjo hoop and a spring device to keep down the pressure bar of the banjo tailpiece.

Later he patented his "Defiance” banjo which had a 9 in. vellum glued direct on to a l/4” square bezel though which straining bolts passed to engage in a flange fixed to an all-metal resonator-type back. The metal hoop had oval-shape vents cut into it at regular intervals all the way round its perimeter. The metal used in this unusual banjo was very thin aluminum (or some other lightweight alloy) and the instrument was extremely light to handle.

It is doubtful whether Daniels actually made the instruments himself. The hoops were obviously spun and the conventional arm used could have been made in the workshops of John E. Dallas. It is possible that Daniels assembled the instruments so in effect he could rightly call himself an "instrument maker." The Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) presented Daniels with a silver medallion inscribed with the Fleur de Lys and this was fixed to the peghead of the banjo Joe Daniels always played in his public performances.

He died in March 1915, at the age of 73.

 

Apr 29, 2024 - 12:42:42 PM

1988 posts since 4/25/2007

I think we have to be cautious with information from the VBM site which is pretty much a continuation of the good work of Terry Holland. It's very much a work in progress and not all the information is proven. I'm not completely sold on the the Dallas neck building story but it is certainly a possibility. There is a similarity in certain aspects of the peghead shape on the OP banjo and a Dallas design. The tuners on Daniels Defiance banjos (1890's) are also quite interesting as they started to appear on Dallas banjos about 1900 so there is a connection between the two. What is clever about those tuners is they had a small pin inserted into the tuner post hole quite securely. I've found if you loop the string over the post you just tighten the string onto the loop. It's an innovative concept but I think a lot get removed. I know little about Daniels but he was certainly a prolific individual in all aspects of the banjo. He also had 15 children ! I have little doubt at least a few of those were involved in his business.

Apr 30, 2024 - 9:39:18 AM
likes this

1988 posts since 4/25/2007

The first photo are earlier examples of the tuners with bone buttons. The second and third photos are from a Dallas from the early 1900's the buttons on those appear to be some kind of plastic. 




 

Edited by - Stephen John Prior on 04/30/2024 09:43:13

Apr 30, 2024 - 9:45:58 AM

1988 posts since 4/25/2007

Dallas button.


 

Apr 30, 2024 - 12:44:54 PM

348 posts since 11/4/2009

quote:
Originally posted by banjonz

Performer, composer, arranger and teacher of the banjo, Joe Daniels (whose real name was Joseph Toledano) established a studio at 28 Bishopsgate Street, London, in 1870 and, after a few years, moved to 112 Leadenhall Street where lie started to advertise himself as "Musical Instrument Maker" and teacher of the banjo, mandolin and guitar - in addition to Stage dancing. In 1887 he took out a patent for a metal casing (or "sound box") round the banjo hoop and a spring device to keep down the pressure bar of the banjo tailpiece.

Later he patented his "Defiance” banjo which had a 9 in. vellum glued direct on to a l/4” square bezel though which straining bolts passed to engage in a flange fixed to an all-metal resonator-type back. The metal hoop had oval-shape vents cut into it at regular intervals all the way round its perimeter. The metal used in this unusual banjo was very thin aluminum (or some other lightweight alloy) and the instrument was extremely light to handle.

It is doubtful whether Daniels actually made the instruments himself. The hoops were obviously spun and the conventional arm used could have been made in the workshops of John E. Dallas. It is possible that Daniels assembled the instruments so in effect he could rightly call himself an "instrument maker." The Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) presented Daniels with a silver medallion inscribed with the Fleur de Lys and this was fixed to the peghead of the banjo Joe Daniels always played in his public performances.

He died in March 1915, at the age of 73.

 


Thanks for this. I have a defience waiting restoration

Apr 30, 2024 - 12:46:37 PM

348 posts since 11/4/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen John Prior

Dallas button.


I have a set of these, or something very similar... can't remember what they came off though

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Privacy Consent
Copyright 2024 Banjo Hangout. All Rights Reserved.





Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.25