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Apr 25, 2024 - 3:53:31 AM
41171 posts since 3/5/2008

I am not a computer geek...

But that threat dose seem to be real ..

How dose it really work?

I know that there are very knowlagable folks on this subject here..

Please if you can explain things in laymans terms..
Well i would appresheate that..

Apr 25, 2024 - 7:35:49 AM

Owen

Canada

15062 posts since 6/5/2011
Online Now

Not considering myself particularly knowledgeable, I asked the all-knowing (?) Google: "the use of computer technology to disrupt the activities of a state or organization, especially the deliberate attacking of information systems for strategic or military purposes."   [I trust greater insights will follow.  yes ]

Made me think of Theodore Roosevelt's pronouncement: "If you've got them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow."

Edited by - Owen on 04/25/2024 07:37:31

Apr 25, 2024 - 7:40:48 AM

3051 posts since 2/12/2005

Here's an example. The cia wanted to disrupt the nuclear centrifuges in iran. They created a computer worm that was unique to the equipment they were using. The software could speed up the centrifuges until they destroy themselves. Search stuxnet

Apr 25, 2024 - 7:48:30 AM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

13780 posts since 2/22/2007

Well, if all the airlines and power companies and hospitals and banks were suddenly offline indefinitely then most of us would be well and thoroughly screwed. We no longer have a robust telephone system or even analog radio, so no communications. Hell, many young people cannot find their way home without GPS! If internet is down, almost all business is down, and the issues of getting food and fuel become huge. A big cyber attack is every bit as devastating as dropping bombs, other than nuclear bombs.

Apr 25, 2024 - 7:50:21 AM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

13780 posts since 2/22/2007

And ALL of our vulnerability is self imposed, or rather, imposed upon society today so as to increase current profits and push any negatives down the road for others to deal with.

Apr 25, 2024 - 8:08:42 AM

ChunoTheDog

Canada

2367 posts since 8/9/2019

quote:
Originally posted by randybartlett

Here's an example. The cia wanted to disrupt the nuclear centrifuges in iran. They created a computer worm that was unique to the equipment they were using. The software could speed up the centrifuges until they destroy themselves. Search stuxnet


that was the israelis btw

 

they're doing it again right now and good for them

Apr 25, 2024 - 8:58:26 AM

Buddur

USA

3917 posts since 10/23/2004

Imagine, Fig, if all your equipment were run by computers, and someone hacked their way into your main computer and cut you out of being able to operate your equipment and company. They could cause your machinery to operate and destroy things around them such as your home and banjo, and then travel and destroy everything they encounter...they could cause all your explosive material to detonate and level your personal property...etc etc etc...and there would be nothing you could do about it. And when it's all done you are left with nothing. All because someone hacked into your computer system that use to run everything.

Apr 25, 2024 - 9:02:27 AM

1677 posts since 11/10/2022

Software engineers put functions into all software enabled devices that allow them to do things like factory reset, power off, change voltage levels on various devices under control, erase data, add data etc.

All of these things can be abused for harm.

Apr 25, 2024 - 9:49:06 AM

41171 posts since 3/5/2008

Well...
At least we are not...vunerable.... :0/

Apr 26, 2024 - 4:07:10 PM

donc

Canada

7444 posts since 2/9/2010

During WW2 the Nazis had some great ideas. In recent years some divers found several printing press photo engravings . On close examination they were actual reproductions of British currency. The original plan was to drop zillions of counterfeit bills throughout the British Isles. Such a plan would have destroyed the British economy overnight. Fortunately it didn't come about because Germany surrendered and the war ended. The Germans who were working on this plan only had one choice. Dumping these plates into deep water for 60 years kept them from ever being charged.
...There will always be evil in the hearts of men.

Apr 26, 2024 - 5:56:38 PM

chuckv97

Canada

72046 posts since 10/5/2013

Lemmings heading for the cliff,,,, ie, us stupid humans

Apr 26, 2024 - 6:19:05 PM

7683 posts since 7/24/2013

quote:
Originally posted by banjo bill-e

Well, if all the airlines and power companies and hospitals and banks were suddenly offline indefinitely then most of us would be well and thoroughly screwed. We no longer have a robust telephone system or even analog radio, so no communications. Hell, many young people cannot find their way home without GPS! If internet is down, almost all business is down, and the issues of getting food and fuel become huge. A big cyber attack is every bit as devastating as dropping bombs, other than nuclear bombs.


I'm not sure being inconvenienced is the same thing as being blown up. 

Apr 26, 2024 - 6:30:59 PM
like this

7683 posts since 7/24/2013

The advent of all technologies leads to ways to weaponize it. It's what humans do, we kill stuff. That said, the people making important redundancy machines are not the same people making laptops, so we won't ever be in a position where every plane suddenly drops out of the sky or nonsense like that. Cyber warfare will probably remain inconvenient more than catastrophic, it's simply much easier to blow things up - it's also much better for the economy. As an old school hacker that at one point probably had a few hundred computers under my thumb, the greatest asset to cyber crime is dumb people. Heck, if you have a wifi connected refrigerator it's probably being used to send spam emails out and you'll never be the wiser. A larger concern for me is countries that use cyber attacks on their own people, it's a lot easier to keep information from leaving Gaza when you can cut off their internet, the same thing with Iran, and the same thing with China. Governments have legislated their own "back doors".

Apr 26, 2024 - 6:46:09 PM

7683 posts since 7/24/2013

I was remiss in not mentioning the most common, and effective, method of cyber warfare. It plays out every day on Twitter, Rumble, Youtube, Facebook, ect... manipulating populaces with carefully edited videos, deep fake videos, and troll farm accounts is scary in it's effectiveness.

Apr 29, 2024 - 11:34:10 AM

594 posts since 4/11/2019

STUD figmo Al

it works like this:

Pew! Pew! Pew!!

Pew! Pew!!

Apr 29, 2024 - 1:57:27 PM
likes this

3209 posts since 7/28/2015

There's a whole bunch of ways that cyber attacks can work. Some of them are easier to understand that others.

A denial-of-service attack or DoS attack, for example, is pretty easy to understand. Imagine that someone really hated banjos and they didn't want us to be able to talk about them any more. A dumb way to accomplish this might be do have all of their friends get together and create as many BHO users as possible and then post as much random stuff as possible so that it wouldn't just make it impossible to read the BHO but would actually create too much for the servers to do.

A code injection attack is a little harder to understand. You can imagine the way that one might work for the BHO too. Each time we write a post on here, the message gets stored in a database with a command. But databases can also run code like "Delete this database". If the writer of the forum software wasn't careful, someone could write into a the message box a command that would be very similar to "delete this database" and when the software tried to store the message in the database, the database would instead run the code and delete itself.

A hard to understand kind of cyber attack is a buffer overflow attack. You might imagine this one as being kind of like if a computer were a banjo player who was trying to read tab to play along. If you put an extra note in the tab, you can imagine that someone would be a note off of the music they were trying to play along to and it would make everything sound terrible. The way a program works is not very far off from a banjo player reading tab and sometimes by adding a just a couple bytes to a program it can disable the whole program or even allow someone to take over a computer.

A lot of what happens in cyber attacks though are just tricking people into running software that they shouldn't. For example, you can imagine that someone who works for the government might want to encrypt everything on their hard drive so that only a person who knows the password could get the information. A slight variant of that software could encrypt the hard drive of someone who didn't want that to happen and who doesn't have the password, and then whoever wrote the program could force them to pay for the password in order to get their computer and information back.

Apr 29, 2024 - 2:07:40 PM

41171 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

There's a whole bunch of ways that cyber attacks can work. Some of them are easier to understand that others.

A denial-of-service attack or DoS attack, for example, is pretty easy to understand. Imagine that someone really hated banjos and they didn't want us to be able to talk about them any more. A dumb way to accomplish this might be do have all of their friends get together and create as many BHO users as possible and then post as much random stuff as possible so that it wouldn't just make it impossible to read the BHO but would actually create too much for the servers to do.

A code injection attack is a little harder to understand. You can imagine the way that one might work for the BHO too. Each time we write a post on here, the message gets stored in a database with a command. But databases can also run code like "Delete this database". If the writer of the forum software wasn't careful, someone could write into a the message box a command that would be very similar to "delete this database" and when the software tried to store the message in the database, the database would instead run the code and delete itself.

A hard to understand kind of cyber attack is a buffer overflow attack. You might imagine this one as being kind of like if a computer were a banjo player who was trying to read tab to play along. If you put an extra note in the tab, you can imagine that someone would be a note off of the music they were trying to play along to and it would make everything sound terrible. The way a program works is not very far off from a banjo player reading tab and sometimes by adding a just a couple bytes to a program it can disable the whole program or even allow someone to take over a computer.

A lot of what happens in cyber attacks though are just tricking people into running software that they shouldn't. For example, you can imagine that someone who works for the government might want to encrypt everything on their hard drive so that only a person who knows the password could get the information. A slight variant of that software could encrypt the hard drive of someone who didn't want that to happen and who doesn't have the password, and then whoever wrote the program could force them to pay for the password in order to get their computer and information back.


Thankyou...

This is what i was looking for...

 

I have a better understanding of it now..

 

Rather than just a term i hear used..

 

N..great analogy... :0)

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