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Apr 19, 2024 - 8:59:44 PM
665 posts since 1/24/2014

I’ve got a late 60s Chevy truck with front and rear drum brakes. It’s been sitting for a couple of years due to running issues and not being a priority to work on. I’ve finally got it running pretty well, how ever from sitting so long in my side yard it would seem the brake shoes have stuck to the drums. I’ve thought about pulling the truck with my other truck to see if they will break free. Another person I know suggested tapping the wheels with a hammer while someone else sits in the truck feathering the clutch to try and break them loose. This is a pretty diverse group with lots of life experiences. Do any of you have other suggestions that have actually worked for you or someone you know.

Apr 20, 2024 - 4:12:26 AM

221 posts since 1/17/2019

There is a YouTube video “5 ways how to remove a stuck brake drum”

Apr 20, 2024 - 4:26:03 AM

665 posts since 1/24/2014

Thanks Steve for the info. What I’m trying to do is get the wheels to roll so I can move the truck to a better location to work on the brakes. It’s currently sitting in my side yard which isn’t an ideal location to do a brake job.

Apr 20, 2024 - 4:56:54 AM
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221 posts since 1/17/2019

Tendency is to beat the crap out of the drum with a hammer…which may crack the drum..which will free it up…but not the outcome you want! I assume the parking brake is off?? May try to rock the vehicle. Good luck!

Apr 20, 2024 - 5:10:54 AM
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heavy5

USA

3054 posts since 11/3/2016

I'd squirt WD40 into the stud holes , rotate the drums if possible , & use something larger than a carpenters hammer w/ a few good whacks , not up on the shoe area , but on the sides --- missing the studs !

Apr 20, 2024 - 5:59:20 AM
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41111 posts since 3/5/2008

Beat the drum...

In a circle fashin...

Use at least a 2 lb hammer..
You do not half to ..kill the drum..

Allso back off the adjusters before you start..

Apr 20, 2024 - 6:12:54 AM

Owen

Canada

15030 posts since 6/5/2011

Any chance linkages (?) are seized rather than shoe actually stuck to drum?

I'm no mechanic, but I don't see mucho harm in towing it a short distance* with the wheels skidding.  Even better/easier if it's on wet grass or loose gravel.

* = whatever that means. wink

Good luck.

Apr 20, 2024 - 7:50:19 AM

Owen

Canada

15030 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by stevebsq

There is a YouTube video “5 ways how to remove a stuck brake drum”


The illustration for the "5th. method" in ^^ video shows the drum already removed???  

To my thinking, working in behind the drum [i.e. between backplate (?) and leaf spring] to perform some of the procedures would be kinda difficult.... and doing them after drum removal .... well ... ???

What am I missing?

Apr 20, 2024 - 7:52:04 AM
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41111 posts since 3/5/2008

Ha..!

Make sure the E brake is not on...

You laughf....
I seen that a few times... :0/

Apr 20, 2024 - 7:59:36 AM

1676 posts since 11/10/2022

Id disconnect the drive shaft, put it in neutral and tow that truck to wherever I needed too.

Hard whacks with a rubber mallot never hurt anything. Then a puller set from harbor freight and those drums will pop right off.

Apr 20, 2024 - 10:19:56 AM

79648 posts since 5/9/2007

If you use a puller you might pull the shoes and springs off with the drum.
Big iron torque mall with forceful rotational smacks as Al said.
Not on the sides but straight on in line with the axle.
Then you have the axle flange backing up the hit and saving the drum.
Back off the star adjusters around 1 complete turn.

Hit between the studs.

Apr 20, 2024 - 10:57:19 AM
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1676 posts since 11/10/2022

Id want to replace the shoes and springs anyway. No harm if they come off.

That being said, Ive never had shoes and springs come off and I used to replace brakes and turn drums and rotors for a living.

You can also buy a jig to hit it with an impact wrench.

Apr 20, 2024 - 11:01:56 AM
Players Union Member

rigid

USA

5 posts since 12/20/2011

I would try a torch and heat the drum, then tap with hammer

Apr 20, 2024 - 11:17:55 AM

Owen

Canada

15030 posts since 6/5/2011

What would cause the front shoes to be in contact with the drums when the truck was last parked [in the side yard]?  And for the rear ones, anything other than the emergency brake being applied?  Could pressing the brake pedal at some point during the not running/sitting  phase cause it?

I'm with you Richard, only that ^^ would be my plan "B" ... if "A"  schmucking [more so than "tap"] didn't work.  From almost 50 years back, I still remember a neighbour helping me assemble something or other while repairing a tractor: "It should fit ... you shouldn't have to force it." ... so it might be kinda a balancing (?) act. wink

Edited by - Owen on 04/20/2024 11:29:50

Apr 20, 2024 - 11:29:07 AM

79648 posts since 5/9/2007

The drum can be hit quite hard on its face.

Apr 20, 2024 - 11:40:06 AM

12730 posts since 8/22/2006
Online Now

There some that might need to binge watch Roadworthy Recuses on YouTube. The host carries a BFH with him.

Apr 20, 2024 - 1:28:56 PM

665 posts since 1/24/2014

Success, took the hubcaps and trim rings off. Took a dead blow hammer and hit the rear wheels around the raised surface that holds the hubcap. Started it up and rocked it back and forth. Then came out under its own power. Parked it on the street in front of my side yard.


 

Apr 20, 2024 - 1:30:28 PM

665 posts since 1/24/2014

Now maybe my grass will grow back.


 

Apr 20, 2024 - 2:10:18 PM

41111 posts since 3/5/2008

Nice little truck..Dude..

Apr 20, 2024 - 2:27:29 PM
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665 posts since 1/24/2014

Thanks Al I mean Stud. It has your typical rusted areas for Chevy trucks. But up until a couple of years ago was as reliable as my newer vehicles. I’ve got a little spare change this year so I plan on maybe doing some work on it this spring and summer.

Apr 20, 2024 - 2:35:37 PM

41111 posts since 3/5/2008

6cyl or 8..?

Apr 20, 2024 - 4:09:34 PM
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665 posts since 1/24/2014

6cylinder, 3 speed on the column, no power anything and wood bed ( which has of course has rotted). I have 2 or 3 people a year ask if I want to sell it. I’ve thought about it but the misses says know. Her dad worked and retired from the St. Louis GM truck plant. Plus she and the truck are both 67 model years.

Apr 21, 2024 - 4:48:40 AM
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heavy5

USA

3054 posts since 11/3/2016

I love these kind of posts --- brings out the greasy knuckle experts !
nice truck !

Apr 21, 2024 - 5:17:45 AM
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62066 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by britcarfan

Success, took the hubcaps and trim rings off. Took a dead blow hammer and hit the rear wheels around the raised surface that holds the hubcap. Started it up and rocked it back and forth. Then came out under its own power. Parked it on the street in front of my side yard.


"I LOVE a story with a Happy Ending! Don't you?"

-F. Godmother-

 

======================================================

"Sorry to have to tell you, but your Blow Hammer is dead!"

-Rex Veekelles, M.D.-

Apr 22, 2024 - 6:16:08 AM

Buddur

USA

3913 posts since 10/23/2004

Did you get the drums off? In time, a lip of rust develops on the drums between the shoes and the edge of the drum thereby creating a ridge making drum removal difficult. There is a port in the backing plate where you can back off the springs so this lip/ridge will slip over the shoes. And if worse comes to worse, don't worry about the shoes/springs, etc and yank the drum off with all yer might. It'll all go back together, and if it's been sitting for that long just get new brake parts.

Apr 22, 2024 - 7:24:52 AM

79648 posts since 5/9/2007

They often stick at the axle flange where it pokes through at the center of the drum/wheel.

Edited by - steve davis on 04/22/2024 07:36:25

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