Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

247
Banjo Lovers Online


Mar 4, 2024 - 3:40:20 PM
90 posts since 8/2/2014

I know there have been threads on this subject and I've read some of them. I just need someone to explain to me exactly what the Zero Glide Nut does. What difference does it make (assuming it's an improvement)? Is the cost / value ratio worth doing?
TIA.

Mar 4, 2024 - 4:03:02 PM

rcc56

USA

5057 posts since 2/20/2016

The theory is that the zero-fret part of the Zero-glide nut causes the tone of the open string to match the tone of the fretted strings.

There are folks who think it is the greatest invention since sliced bread. I'm not one of them.

Do I think that its effect on the tone of the open strings tone is that different from what a good bone nut produces? As a player, my answer is no. Others may disagree with with me.

Is it worth the cost and trouble to install one to find out? As a repairman, I think not. They are a bit of a pain to install. But if you've got a banjo with a synthetic nut, it might be worth your while to install a well-made bone nut.

Mar 4, 2024 - 4:07:16 PM

79585 posts since 5/9/2007

The Gold Tone neck I just bought has one
I expect it will last a long time without changing first fret string clearance.

Mar 5, 2024 - 6:20:53 AM
likes this

619 posts since 11/2/2009

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

The Gold Tone neck I just bought has one
I expect it will last a long time without changing first fret string clearance.


Perhaps you will feel comfortable weighing in on tone and other impacts when you get that on a pot. 

Mar 5, 2024 - 7:36:08 AM

119 posts since 11/3/2015

I'm a big fan. I have one on my conversion banjo. Much less sensitivity to nut wear and tear and other slotting problems. You obviously would not want to put one on a banjo with a compensated nut such as a Stelling but I can't find any downside otherwise.

Mar 5, 2024 - 7:44:02 AM
likes this

2401 posts since 2/9/2007

I've not used one, but I'd expect it to reduce friction at the nut, which will improve tuning accuracy and stability.

Mar 5, 2024 - 8:21:48 AM

144 posts since 7/24/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Dan Gellert

I've not used one, but I'd expect it to reduce friction at the nut, which will improve tuning accuracy and stability.


It dramatically helped with D-Tuner issues I was having on a gold tone bela fleck neck so I think your statement is spot on. 

Mar 5, 2024 - 8:58:23 AM

79585 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by gcpicken
quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

The Gold Tone neck I just bought has one
I expect it will last a long time without changing first fret string clearance.


Perhaps you will feel comfortable weighing in on tone and other impacts when you get that on a pot. 


Sure thing.

I just ordered a Prucha long-nut co rod set w/neck bolts,tailpiece bracket and washers from Greg Boyd.$60 including shipping.

Edited by - steve davis on 03/05/2024 08:59:29

Mar 6, 2024 - 12:49:12 AM

banjo roo

Australia

226 posts since 5/12/2010

I have one. Improved tone - in my view probably not.

Improved tuning accuracy and stability - yes (main reason I installed them).

Mar 6, 2024 - 6:20:51 AM

119 posts since 11/3/2015

Definitely help a lot with D-Tuners, which I have on two banjos. With respect to tone, we need to remember that we're only talking about the 4 unfretted open strings. Might want to avoid if you're primarily a clawhammer guy.

Interestingly, my Stelling, which has a compensated nut, does not use a 5th string pip, but instead runs the string over the 5th fret.

Banjos are like fingerprints - no two alike.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Privacy Consent
Copyright 2024 Banjo Hangout. All Rights Reserved.





Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.359375