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Nov 29, 2023 - 3:51:35 PM

Kellie

USA

117 posts since 1/19/2018

Ok so I've figured out that placing the banjo on the right thigh with a straight back works best for five finger style classical playing. I've also found that the thumb behind the neck is preferable because it allows easier slides and position changes. Keep the tips of the fingers on the right hand on the strings at all times unless legato or pedal is indicated. In case of legato lift one finger at a time. If pedal is indicated keep all fingers off the strings. Really what I'm doing is creating a toolbox to interpret sheet music with. This is still in it's early stages, but I think I may be onto something here.

Nov 29, 2023 - 6:10:59 PM

Kellie

USA

117 posts since 1/19/2018

Ok so some amendments

1.) The thumb is best placed under the second finger on the left hand.

2.) Always keep fingers on the right hand on the strings unless told to only use a certain amount.

3.) Pedal is where the fingers are suspended above the strings and pluck from that position.

4.) When string crossing, legato is where you pluck one finger on the right hand and and set it back down as soon as you pluck the other string. Not before, not after. You must be perfectly in sync.

Nov 30, 2023 - 12:19:52 PM

280 posts since 4/19/2012

Hi Kellie,

I just got one of those 7-string banjos (steel strings so far) I mentioned in your last thread and I'm wanting to start playing guitar fingerstyle on it. Seems like a cool way to expand my repertoire and technical abilities.

I've never played guitar before, and I'm partially using guitar tutorials to approach this instrument. Do you think classical guitar instruction can be adapted meaningfully to the banjitar without having experience on an actual nylon strung guitar? Certainly some things won't translate very well to the different timbre & sustain -- but I'm curious to know if it's worth experimenting with or if I should just stick to steel-string fingerstyle methods for now. Any pitfalls to be aware of?

(Also I don't want to hijack the thread but if anyone's got good resources for learning fingerstyle guitar then DMs are appreciated.)

Nov 30, 2023 - 12:46:50 PM

Kellie

USA

117 posts since 1/19/2018

quote:
Originally posted by ObsidianSpike

Hi Kellie,

I just got one of those 7-string banjos (steel strings so far) I mentioned in your last thread and I'm wanting to start playing guitar fingerstyle on it. Seems like a cool way to expand my repertoire and technical abilities.

I've never played guitar before, and I'm partially using guitar tutorials to approach this instrument. Do you think classical guitar instruction can be adapted meaningfully to the banjitar without having experience on an actual nylon strung guitar? Certainly some things won't translate very well to the different timbre & sustain -- but I'm curious to know if it's worth experimenting with or if I should just stick to steel-string fingerstyle methods for now. Any pitfalls to be aware of?

(Also I don't want to hijack the thread but if anyone's got good resources for learning fingerstyle guitar then DMs are appreciated.)


Sorry I wouldn't know. My technique is for 5 string banjo. Banjitar is not within my studies.

Nov 30, 2023 - 1:08:32 PM

280 posts since 4/19/2012

Ahh my mistake! I had assumed you were a classical guitarist adapting your methods to the banjo and would have insight into the more technical differences between the two instruments. Carry on yes

Nov 30, 2023 - 1:18:07 PM
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8072 posts since 9/21/2007
Online Now

Do you intend to sound multiple notes in a row on the same string using the same finger over and over?

In "classic" banjo we use a system of alternate fingering where rapid runs are done alternating between the thumb and first or the first and second depending on the string and circumstance.

As far as adapting sheet music, you might check out some of the well established edits that are used in classic banjo music. Things like double flagging the 5th string Gs, position marking, fingerings, etc.. It is similar to what the classical guitar world uses but different in several ways. Instead of pima we use + . : and so forth for each right hand finger. Position markings are fret number with type, so 5P would be 5th fret position.

All the info can be found in any C notation tutor.

Nov 30, 2023 - 1:29:33 PM

Kellie

USA

117 posts since 1/19/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks

Do you intend to sound multiple notes in a row on the same string using the same finger over and over?

In "classic" banjo we use a system of alternate fingering where rapid runs are done alternating between the thumb and first or the first and second depending on the string and circumstance.

As far as adapting sheet music, you might check out some of the well established edits that are used in classic banjo music. Things like double flagging the 5th string Gs, position marking, fingerings, etc.. It is similar to what the classical guitar world uses but different in several ways. Instead of pima we use + . : and so forth for each right hand finger. Position markings are fret number with type, so 5P would be 5th fret position.

All the info can be found in any C notation tutor.


Not all the time just when interpretation calls for it, but there's also hammer ons and pulloffs. The left hand picks just as much as the right hand sometimes. I call it "5 finger style", but it's really a combination of all finger techniques and I use and notate the ones I think fit the music best, especially since I'm the one writing it. Like you said, it's all dependent on string and circumstance.

Nov 30, 2023 - 1:36:26 PM

8072 posts since 9/21/2007
Online Now

We use left hand "snaps" and hammer slurs too. "Pulloffs" are something one would do in the privacy of their own home.wink

Edited by - Joel Hooks on 11/30/2023 13:36:46

Dec 1, 2023 - 9:27:28 AM

630 posts since 4/14/2014

Left hand pizzicato.

Dec 1, 2023 - 1:33:42 PM

Kellie

USA

117 posts since 1/19/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Nic Pennsylvania

Left hand pizzicato.


Yeah. But I want to train it better than anyone has ever seen. It's ambitious, but I think I can do it.

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