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Dec 7, 2022 - 4:53:18 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

I read this article about the continuing effort to figure why we get colds in the wintertime. Mama may have been right after all? When she knit you that muffler! Or the now we have the MASK!

https://currently.att.yahoo.com/att/cm/scientists-finally-know-why-people-114031554.html

Dec 7, 2022 - 5:13:33 AM

STUD

USA

37333 posts since 3/5/2008
Online Now

A mask is a feel good thing at ..best..imo..

Dec 7, 2022 - 6:19 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

As kids we didn't have masks. But mom always made sure when we headed outdoors to play, in the winter, we had stocking cap on our head (or hood up on our parka) and a muffler around our nose and throat. Not that they stayed there too long, but for colds she may have been right just like her mother, and her mother's mother, and so on.
As she would dress us for play, she would always say, "Now leave your hat and scarf on, or you will catch your death of cold!"
Brad

Dec 7, 2022 - 8:18:26 AM

Owen

Canada

12246 posts since 6/5/2011

I suspect there's merit in the findings.   I wonder how/if the findings apply to people in places where temp. are fairly stable .... San Diego (?) / people in long-term care facilities year-round / people living in the high Arctic, etc.   

I suppose the breath follows the path of least resistance..... when a pore (?) in a mask or scarf gets plugged with frost*, then ...???    I think the benefit would be proportional to the volume of air held as surge capacity (?) within the fashion statement. (?) 

It's -30 C. here today.... 100% of the cooties might already be dead, making the 5 degree C. drop in nasal temp. [that would kill 50%] a moot point.  wink

* = 'way back a classmate who was on the cross-country team ran about 8 miles to school every day as part of his training.  On really cold days he loosely wrapped his noggin in a long knit scarf leaving only a slit for his eyes. He'd arrive with a considerable ball of frost on his face.

W

Edited by - Owen on 12/07/2022 08:18:55

Dec 7, 2022 - 1:29:02 PM

Brian T

Canada

19539 posts since 6/5/2008

Interesting test done in some Canadian elementary school class rooms in winter.
Some rooms were heavily humidified, the others were left typically Canadian winter dry air.
Nobody in each school knew which room was which. All sorts of socioeconomic districts.

The hypothesis was that the really dry air would promote coughing and the spread of any and all bacteria and virus. Absenteeism was the measure.
30% max illness by the end of February in the dry rooms, 5% in the humidified rooms.

I have a big cold water humidifier, I want to see some fog on my windows at 20 below. Considering that our tp water is sweet snow field melt, I'm amazed how fast the sponge wick gets crusty. Needs a change before Christmas for certain.

Dec 7, 2022 - 4:52 PM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007

Heat is good.
Cold is bad.

Dec 7, 2022 - 5:36:58 PM
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kww

USA

1984 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Heat is good.
Cold is bad.


When I was nineteen, I vowed that I would never live anywhere where water became a solid again. Over forty years later, I've kept that promise and have no regrets whatsoever.

Dec 8, 2022 - 11:26:57 AM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007

I've lived in Maine all my life with no regrets or desire to live anywhere else.
Big piece of advice for cold weather clothes.
Warm feet,hands and head.
Footwear not too tight.
Long underwear.

Dec 8, 2022 - 3:34:24 PM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

I've lived in Maine all my life with no regrets or desire to live anywhere else.
Big piece of advice for cold weather clothes.
Warm feet,hands and head.
Footwear not too tight.
Long underwear.


"long underwear", growing up my brothers and I always had a set of thermal underwear, and, wore it often-in the winter.  With modern wear, do kids or adults even wear the old waffled thermal underwear anymore?  Brad

Dec 9, 2022 - 3:35:11 PM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007

Most of today's cold-weather gear (hats,gloves,boots and underwear) bear little resemblance to yesterday's winter wear.
The layers are thinner,lighter yet warmer,but any extra layers will work fine whether waffled or not.
I don't think they'll ever improve on Herman Survivors ,though.

Edited by - steve davis on 12/09/2022 15:37:31

Dec 9, 2022 - 7:00:08 PM
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Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Most of today's cold-weather gear (hats,gloves,boots and underwear) bear little resemblance to yesterday's winter wear.
The layers are thinner,lighter yet warmer,but any extra layers will work fine whether waffled or not.
I don't think they'll ever improve on Herman Survivors ,though.


I looked pretty good in a set of waffled thermals....about 50 years or more ago!  ;-)  Brad

Dec 9, 2022 - 7:10:13 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

16381 posts since 9/27/2007

And now my butt looks like I was spanked with a waffle iron! laugh

Dec 10, 2022 - 1:44:38 PM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007

LL Bean knows all about state of the art winter wear.

Dec 10, 2022 - 2:10:35 PM
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Players Union Member

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

28208 posts since 8/3/2003

Our knitting/crocheting group makes hats, scarves, mittens, bootie type slippers, ear warmers, things like that for cold weather. It's usually made out of acrylic yarn and is easy to care for; i.e., throw it in washer and dryer, and usually give them to charity for those who are homeless or can't afford winter attire.

Dec 11, 2022 - 4:08:02 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

LL Bean knows all about state of the art winter wear.


I am a Filson and Duluth guy when my wallet feels fat.  Brad

Dec 11, 2022 - 4:09:40 AM
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Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

Ok, off topic, but since it is my topic, I just wanted to shout: I GET TO GO HOME TODAY! And stay home through the holidays. I just have 330 miles to go. Brad

Dec 11, 2022 - 10:31:05 AM

Owen

Canada

12246 posts since 6/5/2011

I learn sumpthin' every day ... well some days.   

Growing up,  what we called "long johns" was apparently a "union suit."  Our name for the two piece set  was thermal underwear or tops and bottoms,  but in our part of the world the introduction of the two piece coincided with "waffle knit," as I recall.

https://www.heddels.com/2019/09/winter-undie-land-brief-history-long-underwear/

Anyhoo, nowadays, ^^ all moot ... no long johns or thermal knits or union suits for me  ... it's windpants, either lined/unlined depending on how &^%$^#  c-c-c-o-old it is.

Dec 13, 2022 - 4:07:53 PM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007

A hooded sweatshirt under a chamoise shirt covered with Dickie's lined overalls,woolen socks in Herman Survivors.
My standard uniform for logging down back in the winter.

Dec 14, 2022 - 6:46:36 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

15146 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

A hooded sweatshirt under a chamoise shirt covered with Dickie's lined overalls,woolen socks in Herman Survivors.
My standard uniform for logging down back in the winter.


I have worked some hard jobs, but I cannot imagine much harder work then being a logger, even in the summer. Brad

Dec 14, 2022 - 7:01:12 AM

358 posts since 8/9/2022

I changed my work a few years ago. Previously I'd worked indoors among other colleagues. Now I work outdoors and though I'm frequently meeting and talking with clients we don't share a work space.

I'm in good general health but in that previous office environment I'd get two bugs a year in winter, not exactly flu but usually a sore throat or cough with a high temperature. Since I changed jobs and work outside year-round - including in rain and freezing temperatures in winter - I haven't had any bug whatsoever, not even a slight cold.

I guess that the main way we pick up bugs is touching stuff we share and that someone with a bug has inevitably used, office kettle, kitchen taps, door handles etc., and then rub our eye or touch our face unconsciously. A scarf or mask isn't going to have a big effect on that method of transmission.

As for work clothes in winter I wear a heavy duty jacket and trousers, steel toe-cap boots, leather gloves and a ball cap, (or if it's really cold a woollen beanie). I don't wear a sweater under my jacket, just a T-shirt as my work is quite physical and I keep warm that way. A scarf would just get in the way and be a potential safety issue. Making sure our hands and head stay warm is just basic comfort but still really important. No point having heavy duty gear if we overlook our extremities.

Edited by - quartertoner on 12/14/2022 07:14:18

Dec 14, 2022 - 10:00:03 AM

77152 posts since 5/9/2007


Originally posted by rinemb
quote:

A hooded sweatshirt under a chamoise shirt covered with Dickie's lined overalls,woolen socks in Herman

   quote:

Originally posted by steve davisSurvivors.
My standard uniform for logging down back in the winter.I have worked some hard jobs, but I cannot imagine much harder work then being a logger, even in the summer. Brad


I wouldn't log in the summertime for any amount of money.Bugs and mud and too hot for heavy work.

As long as the saw cuts and the tractor runs the hardest work is done by them.I found groundfishing,sea urchin dragging  and shrimping in the wintertime to be much harder work.

Edited by - steve davis on 12/14/2022 10:03:02

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