%>
Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

263
Banjo Lovers Online


Page: 1  2   3   Next Page   Last Page (3) 

Nov 24, 2022 - 4:00:55 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

Once upon a time a person came in with a 19 fret "longneck" He tuned down to E and it worked for him.

Has anyone seen this before??

Nov 24, 2022 - 7:04:47 AM

7235 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

Once upon a time a person came in with a 19 fret "longneck" He tuned down to E and it worked for him.

Has anyone seen this before??


Pretty much every rimmed banjo as we know them before about 1884 was pitched to A (4th string standard tuning intervals) or Bb.  Nothing "longneck" about it.

Nov 24, 2022 - 10:05:13 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

Hey have a happy thanksgiving

As noted I am referring to now times not then times

Nov 24, 2022 - 10:15:26 AM
likes this

59703 posts since 12/14/2005

Only name that comes to mind is Peter Seeger.
Don't know if he invented it.

Nov 24, 2022 - 11:19:43 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

The person is of shorter stature
He has smaller hands
He used medium strings
The bridge doesn’t move that much
He plays a lot of ‘60’s including
The Weavers and Woody

I’m sharing his adaptations

Nov 24, 2022 - 11:35:43 AM

7235 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

Hey have a happy thanksgiving

As noted I am referring to now times not then times


My point is that any banjo of a reasonable scale may be pitched to A ("E" with the 4th lowered one step).   Nothing needs to be altered.

17 to 20 frets were the common until the three octave neck became a thing after 1893.  Those with less frets were, more or less, full sized banjos with +/- 26" to 28" scales.

Nov 24, 2022 - 4:13:58 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

My point is stop killing the thread 

Edited by - Helix on 11/24/2022 16:15:35

Nov 25, 2022 - 7:58:17 AM
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

I had what I call a "pony longneck" neck made for an old cheap Vega tenor pot. It is a regular scale 5-string neck, but with the 5th string peg and the position markers all moved up the neck three frets. I use strings one notch above medium gauge and tune it to open E, double A. etc. I think the former BHO regular, Old Woodchuck mentioned that he has a similar banjo. I don't know why Pete Seeger didn't think of this in the first place.

Nov 25, 2022 - 8:20:28 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

I found a "prank" picture of the pony longneck banjo that shows the inlaid position markers, 5th string location and frets.


 

Nov 25, 2022 - 8:38:08 AM
like this

1968 posts since 2/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Lew H

I had what I call a "pony longneck" neck made for an old cheap Vega tenor pot. It is a regular scale 5-string neck, but with the 5th string peg and the position markers all moved up the neck three frets. I use strings one notch above medium gauge and tune it to open E, double A. etc. I think the former BHO regular, Old Woodchuck mentioned that he has a similar banjo. I don't know why Pete Seeger didn't think of this in the first place.


I'm sure he did think of it, but he was after the sound he could only get with a longer scale, and had a body that could comfortably handle it.  Behind the self-effacing "folkie" persona most folks projected on him, there was a supremely educated, creative, and sophisticated musician, and that certainly included his understanding of and passion for the design, function, and tone of the instruments he played.

Nov 25, 2022 - 9:23:50 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

Lew H Thank, this is what I was talking about. So helpful.

Nov 25, 2022 - 12:45:14 PM
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

Dan Gellert Pete Seeger's parents were highly educated and immersed in music. He attended college some ( Yale, as I recall: A faculty member at our local university was his college roommate) but I think Pete dropped out. Your idea of longer neck v. heavier strings may be correct for Seeger's thinking, but on the other hand, John Hartford got great tone out of a low tuned bluegrass banjo.

Nov 25, 2022 - 1:01:24 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

I recently heard a pony bass at the jam, it’s just the right scale 

sharing the information helps other people with a singer's dilemma.

Edited by - Helix on 11/25/2022 13:03:22

Nov 26, 2022 - 6:34:27 AM
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

Helix I'm happy to help, but once it backfired. I took my pony longneck to a jam with multiple banjo players. My turn came, I announced a song. A picker saw my capo at the third fret and assumed the song would be in B flat. I had some 'splainin' to do!

Nov 26, 2022 - 10:00:40 AM

12420 posts since 10/27/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Lew H

Dan Gellert Pete Seeger's parents were highly educated and immersed in music. He attended college some ( Yale, as I recall: A faculty member at our local university was his college roommate) but I think Pete dropped out. Your idea of longer neck v. heavier strings may be correct for Seeger's thinking, but on the other hand, John Hartford got great tone out of a low tuned bluegrass banjo.


Pete went to Harvard where his dad taught before UC Berkeley but, like Johnny Appleseed before him, did not graduate.

Nov 26, 2022 - 10:54:49 AM
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

mikehalloran Thanks for the correction. Those Ivy League schools all look alike to me. LOL

He played a concert to a full house of maybe 1200 people at our university (SIU) after he had retired. That old college roommate did the inviting which enticed Pete to come out here. His grandson joined him on stage. The word got out that Pete forgot his banjo as he left his house, and would need a longneck. I offered my RB175, but his song brought along his longneck. I missed out, but at a reception later, Pete did play my banjo and autographed it.

Nov 26, 2022 - 12:56:28 PM
like this

14970 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Dan Gellert
quote:
Originally posted by Lew H

I had what I call a "pony longneck" neck made for an old cheap Vega tenor pot. It is a regular scale 5-string neck, but with the 5th string peg and the position markers all moved up the neck three frets. I use strings one notch above medium gauge and tune it to open E, double A. etc. I think the former BHO regular, Old Woodchuck mentioned that he has a similar banjo. I don't know why Pete Seeger didn't think of this in the first place.


I'm sure he did think of it, but he was after the sound he could only get with a longer scale, and had a body that could comfortably handle it.  Behind the self-effacing "folkie" persona most folks projected on him, there was a supremely educated, creative, and sophisticated musician, and that certainly included his understanding of and passion for the design, function, and tone of the instruments he played.


Thanks, Dan.

I appreciate what you are saying—You could always tune a cello down and play it like a stand-up bass, but it's not even close to the same thing, certainly not to a real musician.

Nov 26, 2022 - 8:16:34 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

I don’t understand the meaning of your post. Ken
Is someone not a real musician?

These adaptations happen all the time and for the good of the music and to help people perform better

Are you being snarky?

Nov 26, 2022 - 9:13:02 PM
like this

Paulf

Australia

3374 posts since 2/1/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

I don’t understand the meaning of your post. Ken
Is someone not a real musician?

These adaptations happen all the time and for the good of the music and to help people perform better

Are you being snarky?


No snarkiness there Larry, just you trying to put someone down again.  You are the only person I know on this site that kills his own thread.

Edited by - Paulf on 11/26/2022 21:24:37

Nov 27, 2022 - 3:14:10 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

Thank you for your contribution.
do you wish to say anything about the subject?

Nov 27, 2022 - 5:04:45 AM

325 posts since 6/15/2006

Why would anybody want to make a normal scale "pony long neck" banjo? I can only see two reasons: 1) You could have a normal banjo, that looked a bit like a long necked one : 2) you could have a normal banjo, where the 5.string tuner would not be so much in the way. Otherwise you might as well use a normal banjo for whatever you like (as far as I can see). Steen.

Edited by - steen on 11/27/2022 05:08:54

Nov 27, 2022 - 6:34:02 AM
Players Union Member

Lew H

USA

2767 posts since 3/10/2008

steen I had mine made because as I got older, my longneck (Gibson RB175) made my arm ache when I played a double A tune for contradances, and actually for the whole dance with tunes in G and D. I thought a shorter scale would be good for that, but I also wanted to be able to capo just as I would on the Gibson or my other regular scale banjos (Being old, I get confused easily). So if I need to play in double D, I capo from the 3rd fret to the 5th and tune for double D

You are right that I could have just put extra heavy strings on any regular banjo. I've had moments when I wish I had done that, but for the reasons I gave, I'm generally glad that I had the pony longneck made. So far as I know, there is nothing sacred about the 5th string peg being at the 5th fret, so why not?.

Tone has been mentioned a couple of times, for instance tuning a cello down to play like a bass. Surely that would take heavier gauge strings, analogous to what I have done on my banjo. Even medium gauge strings sound bad tuned down to E.

Nov 27, 2022 - 7:47:17 AM

325 posts since 6/15/2006

To Lew. It makes sense. With thicker strings it will work almost like the the long-necked you are used to - capoing and all, without being so long. And if the pot is big enough take care of the deeper tones, then why not? Thanks for answering. Steen

Nov 27, 2022 - 10:17:43 AM
likes this

1968 posts since 2/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Lew H

Dan Gellert Pete Seeger's parents were highly educated and immersed in music. He attended college some ( Yale, as I recall: A faculty member at our local university was his college roommate) but I think Pete dropped out. Your idea of longer neck v. heavier strings may be correct for Seeger's thinking, but on the other hand, John Hartford got great tone out of a low tuned bluegrass banjo.


I'm aware of the fact that he didn't have all that much formal education, but he knew his stuff (and was always learning more). 

I love Hartford's banjo tone, too, but it's a different tone from Seeger's.  

Only a few of us are old enough to remember what it was like to perform for a large crowd, WITHOUT ANY AMPLIFICATION. I do think that was a big part of what inspired Pete's choice of instruments. 

Nowadays, it seems silly to put up with unwieldy instruments and setups just to get every last possible bit of volume and projection, but that hasn't always been the case.   

Nov 27, 2022 - 10:46:24 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

16094 posts since 8/30/2006

Great discussion, thank you Lew H for explaining.

Nov 28, 2022 - 10:44:29 AM

12420 posts since 10/27/2006

quote:
Originally posted by steen

To Lew. It makes sense. With thicker strings it will work almost like the the long-necked you are used to - capoing and all, without being so long. And if the pot is big enough take care of the deeper tones, then why not? Thanks for answering. Steen


Not even close.

Page: 1  2   3   Next Page   Last Page (3) 

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.265625