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Oct 1, 2022 - 12:30:50 PM
2 posts since 4/15/2006

I ‘ve tried different string sizes, different bridges other adjusts, but still a sting !
Anyone have experience with this problem ? Solutions
Thanks, Gregory Tuck
!

Oct 1, 2022 - 12:32:18 PM

2 posts since 4/15/2006

Greg Tuck

This is a 5th String sting

Oct 1, 2022 - 12:43:58 PM
like this

2158 posts since 11/17/2018

Never heard the term.

What exactly is the issue?

Oct 1, 2022 - 1:38:20 PM
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beegee

USA

23127 posts since 7/6/2005

I, also, have never heard the term. I imagine that it is a metallic buzz. The problem probably lies in the 5th string nut, often referred to as a "pip." Either the string slot is not cut correctly (too wide or not deep enough) so the string is rattling in the slot or on the fret. I like to cut mine so the 5th string rides on the 5th fret, with the slot merely aligning it. Occasionally, the tailpiece will cause a rattle by having a slight gap in the string path. What arrangement do you have to capo the 5th string? Does the 5th string still "sting" when capoed?

Oct 1, 2022 - 1:43:29 PM
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2034 posts since 5/19/2018

Do you mean when the cut off end of the 5th string sticks out past the winding pip and stings you on the thumb when you bring your hand by the 5th string tuner?

Yep...has happened to me a number of time in the past. One thing that I hate about changing strings. Means that I did not wind the string correctly to begin with and also did not cut it correctly and push the end back in the peg so it would not stab me.

Best solution is to get a set of very high quality small wire snips. Make sure you wind the string correctly when replacing, use the snips to cut the string as close to the winding post as possible, then stuff that string end in the winding post hole.

Oct 1, 2022 - 1:57:52 PM

ChunoTheDog

Canada

1882 posts since 8/9/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Alvin Conder

Do you mean when the cut off end of the 5th string sticks out past the winding pip and stings you on the thumb when you bring your hand by the 5th string tuner?

Yep...has happened to me a number of time in the past. One thing that I hate about changing strings. Means that I did not wind the string correctly to begin with and also did not cut it correctly and push the end back in the peg so it would not stab me.

Best solution is to get a set of very high quality small wire snips. Make sure you wind the string correctly when replacing, use the snips to cut the string as close to the winding post as possible, then stuff that string end in the winding post hole.


I've been 'stung' too many times, once so bad I got blood all over the old Style 3.

Best solution I've found is to leave a long enough tag end on the string, then once restrung nice and proper, I loop back the tag end into the 5th string tuner hole and grab the end that exits on the other side with needlenose pliers and make a folding side-to-side motion and 9/10 times the string will break short enough for no "stinger" tip to be peeking out of the tuner hole.

I also wrap the tip of the pliers in electrical tape so as to not mar 5th string tuning machine or surrouning neck area.

Oct 1, 2022 - 3:19:34 PM

10153 posts since 8/28/2013

You may need to find a better term for what is happening. "Sting" could mean you are poking your finger or it could mean the sound of that string "stings" your ear in comparison to how the other four strings sound.

Like others, I have not heard the term "string sting" so I can't give advice. I only know bee sting, and the movie by that name.

Oct 1, 2022 - 3:32:21 PM

13701 posts since 6/2/2008

Yeah, I hate when this happens. A "sting" sound means something is vibrating that you don't want to. Beegee has described some places to look because certainly you want to start with direct vibration of the fifth string against something.

If you can't isolate that, then it's the fifth string causing something else to vibrate, such as a tailpiece cover, hook, nut, armrest, or another string.

I recently had a high note on the first string causing bad sympathetic vibrations on another string. Head adjustment took care of it. Took a while to find the head tighteness was not where I usually like it.

What kind of banjo is it? Has the sound come out of nowhere or is this how it usually sounds?

Oct 1, 2022 - 6:43:12 PM
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Owen

Canada

11937 posts since 6/5/2011

For some time now I've wondered if, on occasion, there is a correlation between the "post count" and a few of the questions being asked.   But, otoh, my banjo/music knowledge is quite limited, so.....????

Oct 10, 2022 - 6:33:30 AM

2937 posts since 2/12/2005

If I understand correctly, you are hearing an unpleasant resonance when the 5th string is plucked.

In that case, your head or air chamber is "tuned" to G.

You can tighten the head some to get to G# (using the hooks). Alternatively (and easier to try), you can increase the head tension by getting your tailpiece closer to the head (increasing the angle of the strings across the bridge and increasing the down-force of the bridge onto the head).

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