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Aug 16, 2022 - 11:11:13 AM
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88 posts since 9/1/2010

Can anyone help Me, with some details about This banjo, there is no name On it, its Wery good build, it has a tone ring, but not wery heavy, the scale length is 50cm


Edited by - michael staun on 08/16/2022 11:20:58

Aug 16, 2022 - 11:17:16 AM
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9980 posts since 8/28/2013

Pictures?

Aug 16, 2022 - 11:22:27 AM

88 posts since 9/1/2010

The puictures are Up now

Aug 16, 2022 - 11:33:49 AM
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9980 posts since 8/28/2013

Zero fret=eqals "probably German."

Tenor banjo, in case you weren't sure.

Aug 16, 2022 - 4:43:40 PM
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134 posts since 8/31/2015

To add to what George said, zero fret + laminated w/b/w nut = almost certainly German. Unfortunately I can't provide any more info.

Aug 17, 2022 - 3:15:07 AM

88 posts since 9/1/2010

I was thinking european made. The age Maybe around 1930 to 1950 ??? Ant thought On that ?

Aug 17, 2022 - 3:12:57 PM

2 posts since 8/17/2022

Excuse me gentlemen & ladies, I am trying to post a new topic to collectors corner about a banjo that I have recently won at an auction.

I’ve been looking for a banjo for a couple years now. This one called to me but I don’t have any information on it and cannot find anything after extensive research. I’ve uploaded the photos needed to post something and created the post itself but it won’t let me post because it says I’m spam. But my name is not spam it’s Bonnie. Anyway that’s Semantics at this point, can someone help me figure out how I can get past being spam and onto being a full-fledged posting member of we are awesome at Banjo efforting? Thank you.

 

ps. I am deeply sorry for any terrible awful crimes I have committed in the way of posting on this forum. Please forgive me and correct my mistakes with gentle guidance and wisdom. Thank you again. 
 

pss. This is the original post attempted to make and failed failed. So sorry.

 

Good afternoon banjo hangout members. I hope everyone is having a successful week in finding time to play. I have just won a banjo off of a auction site. I am decently educated in most of the lower end mass produced banjos that have been made since the 70s But I cannot find any information on this particular banjo which peaked my interest when I saw it. It is stamped made in Athens, Ohio. There is an Eagle Music Store there though. The banjo has a star on the head stock like a Deering and a Golden Eagle that looks like metal above that. I am posting pictures with it I’m hoping someone can tell me a little bit more about when this banjo was made and any other info. It looks well loved. Thanks ahead of time. 




 

Edited by - bonniekgorman on 08/17/2022 15:15:53

Aug 17, 2022 - 5:02 PM

1899 posts since 2/9/2007

That's a Stewart-MacDonald (Stewmac) built-from-a-kit banjo. A way better banjo than most folks start on, IMO. Just a notch below a pro-grade instrument.

Aug 17, 2022 - 5:40:20 PM

9980 posts since 8/28/2013

Concerning the "spam label maybe you should contact one of the moderators to learn why this has happened and what you can do about it.

Your comment and pictures did show up here, so maybe this is no longer an issue. But I'd check with a moderator anyway.

Edited by - G Edward Porgie on 08/17/2022 17:41:07

Aug 17, 2022 - 6:48:04 PM

2 posts since 8/17/2022

Wow thank you so much. My brother actually is trying to do his first Stewart McDonald kit guitar, so I’ll ask him about these banjo kits. I wonder how much this particular banjo would go for on the market since it’s nicer potentially than I had expected? I just want to make sure that I’m not banging away on some thing that’s more valuable than it needs to be at this moment. I also have a savanna banjo that someone gave me today for 150.

Keep in mind that I just started playing guitar two years ago last May during Covid and my guitar has been with me pretty much 24 hours a day. I literally carry it everywhere with me l I t e r a l l y. You see, I’ve discovered that here in midlife Im somewhat of a musical prodigy whose still in the closet but who has found it’s a part of my soul. So I don’t want to start playing on something nicer since I don’t know how to handle it yet… like I did with an uncataloged Ibanez from the 70s. Ugh. Which one would you suggest I start on?

I am henceforth going to direct my efforts at better posting practices. It’s still not letting me post on a new topic but I’m contacting a moderator. Thanks again so much!

Ps. I’m sorry For hijacking this thread. Please don’t kick me off.

Humbly Yours,

Bonnie

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Aug 18, 2022 - 10:53:18 AM

1899 posts since 2/9/2007

The Stewmac isn't worth a great deal of money. I don't know what they'd go for these days, but well under $1000 for sure! Definitely not a rare collectible. Just a good solid banjo. Any teacher will tell you to start on as good an instrument as you can afford, and you just happened to luck out with that one.
If you paid $150 for a Savannah (bottom of the barrel Chinese) banjo, it was NOT "given" to you... That's about what they go for new, and not worth that IMO, (until you've put nearly that much MORE into it in setup work). Unless you're interested in learning about how to take a banjo apart, put it together, and set it up, pass that one along to someone else who is.
Stick with the Stewmac!

Aug 18, 2022 - 4:51:23 PM

12340 posts since 10/27/2006

That StewMac banjo may have an aluminum pot. This can be set up to be a very playable, decent student banjo. It's not worth as much as the kits with the wood rim and cast, archtop tone ring, however.

Aug 18, 2022 - 8:30:46 PM

9980 posts since 8/28/2013

A Savannah banjo usually is best when it's at the bottom of the Savannah river. Another thing they are good for is thinnng down the cheap aluminum they are made with and using it to wrap leftover dinners.

One can learn a bit about set-up with these Asian beasts if the thing is somewhat co-operative, but too many of those generic Asian banjos refuse to behave.

At least the Stew-Mac can be played, adjusted if needed, and will actually last until you need a higher grade instrument.

Aug 19, 2022 - 9:39:06 AM

12340 posts since 10/27/2006

As a Savannah dealer, I concur. If the StewMac banjo price stays low, go for it, even if it has an aluminum pot. Heck, it looks like it comes with a free Shubb banjo capo—that will set you back $19 on Amazon.

Aug 20, 2022 - 4:18:25 AM
Players Union Member

RioStat

USA

5876 posts since 10/12/2009

quote:
Originally posted by michael staun

I was thinking european made. The age Maybe around 1930 to 1950 ??? Ant thought On that ?


I would say more like 1960-70's

Aug 20, 2022 - 4:22:15 AM
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Players Union Member

RioStat

USA

5876 posts since 10/12/2009

quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran

That StewMac banjo may have an aluminum pot. This can be set up to be a very playable, decent student banjo. It's not worth as much as the kits with the wood rim and cast, archtop tone ring, however.


Pretty sure it's an aluminum pot. If you enlarge the photo, you can just barely see the round, ball bracket shoes that were common on the StewMac aluminum rims, back in the day.

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