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Want to learn Banjo, but which banjo to start with? (Netherlands)

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Aug 15, 2022 - 12:14:25 PM
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Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

Hi all,

Just new here on this forum and hope to find me some answers on which type of banjo will be best for me.

I am from the Netherlands and would like to learn banjo. I already play guitar and I consider myself as a decent fingerpicking guitar player. I like the old blues styles from old blues players like Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Skip James, Sam Lightnin Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt etc. I own a couple of acoustic guitars and electric guitars.

I would like to learn to play the banjo just for fun and that would only be at home. The style I like is bluegrass and I think I will master the fingerpicking technique really quickly. Maybe not....

Which kind of banjo would be the best choice for playing at home? An open back or resonator?

I have my eyes on three resonator banjo's, that is a Harley benton BJ-55PRo, Goldtone AC-5 and a Goldtone CC-50RP.

The Goldtones are more expensive and to be honest a bit above my budget but I could afford it.

I hope to find some answers and would like to thank everyone in advance for answering my questions!

Edited by - Bill Rogers on 08/15/2022 17:26:25

Aug 15, 2022 - 12:45:57 PM
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ChunoTheDog

Canada

1707 posts since 8/9/2019

If you want to pick bluegrass, tradition says get a resonator banjo.
They are louder, heavier and generally have that 'tone' about them over an open back.

Having said that, it's totally acceptable to pick 3 finger style on an openback, too. So the choice is yours.
Keep in mind that if you wish to play with others, a resonator banjo will be easier to hear thru other instruments such as basses and guitars, fiddles etc.

Openbacks are generally less expensive and being less loud, well suited for 'couch picking' if you have neighbour across the hall.

What's your approximate budget? This will help narrow down some choices.

BTW, welcome to BHO! Glad to have you.

Aug 15, 2022 - 1:06:34 PM
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Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

Hi!

My budget will be maximum around 500 euros.

I don't think I will ever play with others.

I will mainly play in my small room and never on the couch because the neighbors will start hearing me play.

I have read that the Gold Tone AC-5 has a removable resonator. Also the CC-50RP.

The Harley Benton BJ-55PRO seems to look like a nice banjo for the pricerange, but not sure about the overall build quality. Do I need a tone ring by the way?

Aug 15, 2022 - 1:35:36 PM
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2886 posts since 5/2/2012

On the Thomann's Netherland's site, the HB banjo is 207 euro, or about 212$ US. So we have an idea of a price point you would like to aim for, but you are willing to go up to 500 euro.

As for the HB banjos, the use of words like "bluegrass series" or "pro" are marketing hype. Nothing bluegrass or pro about those banjos I looked at.

Antoine gave you some good advice. Given your budget, knowing that you will be playing by yourself (rather than in a jam or with a band), and don't want to annoy your neighbors, a decent open back banjo would be a reasonable choice. If BG/Scruggs style in where you are headed, get some picks as well. By the way, they do make mutes for banjos.

My first banjo was an open back that I played with bare fingers (and still do).  It's pretty quiet.  But, as suggested above, get some picks even though that will make your playing a lot louder (you CAN work on picking volume with picks). 

Do you "need" a tone ring? A tone ring adds volume and a different "voice" to your playing. But a quality tone ring adds quite a bit of cost to the banjo. And makes it heavier as well.

You might look at the Recording King banjo(s).  

You might edit the heading of this thread and add the word "Netherlands" in the title,, as there are active members here you have some experience with HB banjos and can give you some suggestions.

Edited by - thisoldman on 08/15/2022 13:41:04

Aug 15, 2022 - 2:11 PM
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Players Union Member

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

27729 posts since 8/3/2003

You have received some good information already, so I'll just add a little:

1. Buy the best banjo you can afford. The better the banjo, the easier it is to fret and pick and stay in tune and the better it will sound.
2. Learn the basics of bluegrass either from a teacher, a good beginner book or online lessons. Since you play guitar, you'll have to get used to the banjo 5th string and out of some of your habits in fingerpicking guitar.
3. You may someday want to play with others, so learn/practice with that in mind. Since you play guitar, becoming multi-instrument will enhance your chances of being asked by others to their jams because you can play more than one instrument.
4. It's been said already, but bears repeating: if you want to play bluegrass, get a resonator guitar, the best you can afford.

Whatever you decide, have fun, enjoy the experience of a banjo. Caveat: once you are hooked on bluegrass, there's no turning back (G).

Aug 15, 2022 - 2:12:25 PM
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Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

This is quite an active forum!

Thanks for all the replies thus far.

Will a resonator banjo be to loud for playing at home?

Why is that they always advice an open back banjo when you want to learn the clawhammer style and a resonator banjo when you want to learn bluegrass?

What about the Gold Tone banjos I mentioned? Both are resonator banjos.

I checked the Recording King site and an affordable resonator like the King Dirty 30s seems a nice one, but is it well build?

An open back like the Recording King Madison is priced higher but it has a satin finish on the neck which I also like on my guitars.

Aug 15, 2022 - 2:15:23 PM

523 posts since 5/21/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

Hi all,

Just new here on this forum and hope to find me some answers on which type of banjo will be best for me.

I am from the Netherlands and would like to learn banjo. I already play guitar and I consider myself as a decent fingerpicking guitar player. I like the old blues styles from old blues players like Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Skip James, Sam Lightnin Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt etc. I own a couple of acoustic guitars and electric guitars.

I would like to learn to play the banjo just for fun and that would only be at home. The style I like is bluegrass and I think I will master the fingerpicking technique really quickly. Maybe not....

Which kind of banjo would be the best choice for playing at home? An open back or resonator?

I have my eyes on three resonator banjo's, that is a Harley benton BJ-55PRo, Goldtone AC-5 and a Goldtone CC-50RP.

The Goldtones are more expensive and to be honest a bit above my budget but I could afford it.

I hope to find some answers and would like to thank everyone in advance for answering my questions!


If your serious about learning to play avoid the cheap Asian built banjos anything up to  450 Euros. For a good beginner resonator banjo with a metal tone ring you should expect to pay upwards of 1600 Euros. Generally speaking Gold Tone, Gold Star, Recording King and Deering all produce good low cost instruments. Look to the peghead for a quick reference. If the tuning pegs stick out like ears avoid those banjos. If you pick up the banjo and it feels heavy you're getting warm. This is just a rough guide, you should go try out a few banjo's, ask local banjo players what they recommend. Also consider buying a second hand banjo.    

Aug 15, 2022 - 2:20 PM
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Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

quote:
Originally posted by FenderFred
quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

Hi all,

Just new here on this forum and hope to find me some answers on which type of banjo will be best for me.

I am from the Netherlands and would like to learn banjo. I already play guitar and I consider myself as a decent fingerpicking guitar player. I like the old blues styles from old blues players like Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Skip James, Sam Lightnin Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt etc. I own a couple of acoustic guitars and electric guitars.

I would like to learn to play the banjo just for fun and that would only be at home. The style I like is bluegrass and I think I will master the fingerpicking technique really quickly. Maybe not....

Which kind of banjo would be the best choice for playing at home? An open back or resonator?

I have my eyes on three resonator banjo's, that is a Harley benton BJ-55PRo, Goldtone AC-5 and a Goldtone CC-50RP.

The Goldtones are more expensive and to be honest a bit above my budget but I could afford it.

I hope to find some answers and would like to thank everyone in advance for answering my questions!


If your serious about learning to play avoid the cheap Asian built banjos anything up to  450 Euros. For a good beginner resonator banjo with a metal tone ring you should expect to pay upwards of 1600 Euros. Generally speaking Gold Tone, Gold Star, Recording King and Deering all produce good low cost instruments. Look to the peghead for a quick reference. If the tuning pegs stick out like ears avoid those banjos. If you pick up the banjo and it feels heavy you're getting warm. This is just a rough guide, you should go try out a few banjo's, ask local banjo players what they recommend. Also consider buying a second hand banjo.    


Hi, 1600 euros is way above my budget. I want to learn banjo just for fun and my maximum budget would be around 500 euros. I don't have the possibility to try out a banjo. I will have to buy it online.

Aug 15, 2022 - 2:49:29 PM

523 posts since 5/21/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick
quote:
Originally posted by FenderFred
quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

Hi all,

Just new here on this forum and hope to find me some answers on which type of banjo will be best for me.

I am from the Netherlands and would like to learn banjo. I already play guitar and I consider myself as a decent fingerpicking guitar player. I like the old blues styles from old blues players like Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Skip James, Sam Lightnin Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt etc. I own a couple of acoustic guitars and electric guitars.

I would like to learn to play the banjo just for fun and that would only be at home. The style I like is bluegrass and I think I will master the fingerpicking technique really quickly. Maybe not....

Which kind of banjo would be the best choice for playing at home? An open back or resonator?

I have my eyes on three resonator banjo's, that is a Harley benton BJ-55PRo, Goldtone AC-5 and a Goldtone CC-50RP.

The Goldtones are more expensive and to be honest a bit above my budget but I could afford it.

I hope to find some answers and would like to thank everyone in advance for answering my questions!


If your serious about learning to play avoid the cheap Asian built banjos anything up to  450 Euros. For a good beginner resonator banjo with a metal tone ring you should expect to pay upwards of 1600 Euros. Generally speaking Gold Tone, Gold Star, Recording King and Deering all produce good low cost instruments. Look to the peghead for a quick reference. If the tuning pegs stick out like ears avoid those banjos. If you pick up the banjo and it feels heavy you're getting warm. This is just a rough guide, you should go try out a few banjo's, ask local banjo players what they recommend. Also consider buying a second hand banjo.    


Hi, 1600 euros is way above my budget. I want to learn banjo just for fun and my maximum budget would be around 500 euros. I don't have the possibility to try out a banjo. I will have to buy it online.


I understand, that being the case you should aim for best you can afford.  As I am sure others have said. You asked for advice I shared my knowledge and personal experience. But in the end it's your choice you have to decide whats best for you and what you can afford. You should check the Members List link below I am sure there are banjo players from Netherlands who would love to help you / let you try out their banjos. 

https://www.banjohangout.org/myhangout/default.asp?method=adv&str=Advanced&username=&firstname=&lastname=&city=&state=&country=Netherlands&experience=&submit=Search

Edited by - FenderFred on 08/15/2022 14:55:08

Aug 16, 2022 - 2:45:38 AM
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4225 posts since 4/29/2012

If you want to learn, and play only at home then ANY banjo with a normal scale length, an 11 inch pot, a reasonable action and the frets in the right place will do the job. Recording king and Goldtone will both do this at the lower end of the range. There used to be a really cheap plastic/composite rimmed banjo by Rover that I recommended for beginners that fulfilled the basic criteria. Not sure if this is still available.
Ignore advice that says you can't get even get started unless you spend $1600, and have a resonator and "proper" banjo tuners. It's nonsense.
Banjos are not like guitars. They're engineering not lutherie. So be prepared to tinker and adjust to get the best results (usually distinguished by the term "setup"). Lots of info here and elswhere online on this.
Resonators just project the sound forward towards your audience so you can compete with a fiddle/mandoline/flatpicked guitar. So you don't need one to learn.
Bluegrass does need metal fingerpicks to play and sound right. So get used to these from day one if that's your chosen genre. I play old time styles so don't (read "can't") use picks.

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Aug 16, 2022 - 6:36:50 AM

2489 posts since 2/4/2013
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As you're not committed to bluegrass resonator or open back I think you should just get the best banjo around 500 Euros. That looks like a Recording King RK-OT25-BR at just above 500 Euros from Thomann. It has a decent rim and will just sound much better than other options. At least you won't then have a somewhat compromised resonator banjo without the real bluegrass twang that might sound ok as an open back with some work on the setup. You'll have a decent sounding open back as a starting point instead.

Aug 16, 2022 - 7:28:54 AM

2886 posts since 5/2/2012

Andrew and Graham chimed in, the two members I was hoping would step in and give some advice. Notice that both don't mention the HB banjos. So, moving up in price, the RK Dirty 30's open back is 329 euro. Getting close to 500 (434 euro) you have the Gold Tone CC-50. Notice I skipped the AC model. If you can stretch a bit above 500, then you have RK, Gold Tone and Goodtime banjos as your choices. I assume that those prices include VAT, so they are all decently priced.

Gold Tone CC-50 reviews  Dirty 30's reviews here and here

Edited by - thisoldman on 08/16/2022 07:42:09

Aug 16, 2022 - 7:44:43 AM

2489 posts since 2/4/2013
Online Now

Actually I will mention the Harley Benton. It's a cheap banjo dressed up with better looking components that must also be really cheap at that price. I recently saw a picture of it converted to an open back and it didn't give me much confidence. I got the impression that if you adjusted the co-ordinator rods just a bit the rim might collapse.

The guitar banjo version BJ65 is also strange and strangely good at this price. Clearly the components much be really cheap but it has a flathead tone ring and I've heard it in a video and it's by far the best sounding cheap guitar banjo I've heard - far better than something like a Goldtone CC Banjitar which costs almost 3 times a such. It might fall apart after three months though.

Aug 16, 2022 - 12:59:32 PM

Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

Hi all!

Thanks for all the good advice!

A couple of questions I have: it has been mentioned to avoid banjo's where the tuning pegs stick out like ears. Why is that?

It's still very confusing which banjo to get. I would like to learn the 3 finger style on banjo. On guitar I master 4 fingers without any problems.

An open back is cheaper and not so loud as a resonator but these type of banjo's seems to be only advised for the clawhammer technique. Also the action on these type of banjo's are higher.

Not sure about the Harley Benton banjo's. I think the overal build quality is poor and the hardware is of a low quality. Think I will skip this brand.

The Recording King recordingking.com/rkot25br is very interesting! I do like a satin finish on the neck. That is what I prefer.

The Gold Tone goldtonemusicgroup.com/goldton...s/cc-50rp is also on my wishlist but this one is above my budget and it is a resonator banjo. Not sure how it will sound in my small room where I always play guitar. I do like this banjo a lot.

Then there is the Recording King recordingking.com/rkh05. Priced at 329 euros on the Thomann site. This one has tuning pegs sticking out like ears.

And what about the Ibanez https://www.thomann.de/nl/ibanez_b200.htm

Last one is a Deering https://www.thomann.de/nl/deering_goodtime_openback.htm The Deering does not have a trust rod in the neck. 

First decision I should make: am going for an open back or a resonator banjo? This one has a glossy neck finish.

Edited by - Dutch_Nick on 08/16/2022 13:04:04

Aug 16, 2022 - 1:53:41 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

15846 posts since 8/30/2006

Now. For Gold Tone, I have played one of the new AC-1's in my shop. I wish we had had that kind of entry level banjo when I was younger and starting out. We played a plastic called Bakelite.  It has a beautiful black stained Maple neck with dual acting truss rod.  They use sealed guitar type tuners @ "better" quality. 

I have spoken with Gold Tone. I would say they let a specialist spec. the right plastic this time.

I have one of the Rover rims in my shop, but it is a different plastic formula, the built in flange needs to be thicker, so I didn't like it as much.

The AC-1 has nice new Black knobs on the guitar tuners @ 14:1. Otherwise, it is not difficult to upgrade to nicer tuners later@ 4:1
But is was the sound quality and volume that impressed the visitors and shop buddies. It has less sustain, but everything is in there in the sound.  High attack, lower sustain and higher decay.  

The Blugrass Resonator vs. Openback is quite real. Some people build universals.  I play any style I can learn on any banjo I like. 
The Ac-1 with resonator is just fine.  You can play any style you like and learn to adjust the mechanicals to get a different sound. 

Use my Helix clothespin mute to be able to play in an apartment.   Roll up a sock and put it under the bridge.
I play 3 & 4 finger guitar with Travis/Atkins and other arpeggios.  The banjo does syncopation , the guitars use the downbeat. You have to learn it.
Fighter escort, everything ok here.


Edited by - Helix on 08/16/2022 14:04:23

Aug 16, 2022 - 5:01:43 PM

2886 posts since 5/2/2012

The banjos that have tuners that stick out like ears (guitar tuners) are not as preferred as planetary tuners, which are more traditional. My first banjo was a Gold Tone CC-OT, which has guitar style tuners. When I bought it, I could have spent an extra $70-80 to swap for planetary tuners, but I chose not to. The guitar style tuners work fine and stay in tune, which is all I need.

Again, you can play any style (clawhammer, 2 finger style, 3 finger style, Scruggs style, or with a plectrum (pick)) with either an open back or resonator banjo. If you were going to play bluegrass music in a group or band, then a resonator banjo would be more traditional. With your circumstances, playing by yourself in an apartment, an openback makes sense with your budget.

Aug 16, 2022 - 5:38:03 PM
Players Union Member

Eric A

USA

1603 posts since 10/15/2019

Seems like folks are usually happy with Recording King banjos at any given price point.

And about those tuners that stick out like ears: It's not that tuners like that can't be good (look at Martin guitars), but in the banjo world when they are trying to build a banjo as cheaply as possible they put the cheapest possible tuners on them and those tend to be extremely cheaply made tuners that stick out like ears. On banjos built to be a step up in quality they go to planetary tuners (they stick out the back). So it ends up being true in the banjo world that a glance at the tuners will tell you whether you are looking at the bottom shelf, or one step up.  No builder is going to put quality guitar type tuners on a banjo because it just wouldn't sell at the required price point.  The buying public expects to see planetary tuners on a better banjo.

Edited by - Eric A on 08/16/2022 17:42:23

Aug 16, 2022 - 9:35:38 PM
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Bart Veerman

Canada

5299 posts since 1/5/2005

The tuning pegs sticking out sideways like on guitars are considered to be cheap & just not cool even though they work better than the planetary type tuners on Asian-made budget priced banjos.

Keeping in mind that banjos are a lot more expensive in Europe than they are in North America, here you go, especially the 1st one should be of particular interest to you:

https://www.marktplaats.nl/v/muziek-en-instrumenten/snaarinstrumenten-banjo-s/m1863735438-fender-fb-55-banjo-met-fishman-pickup
https://www.marktplaats.nl/v/muziek-en-instrumenten/snaarinstrumenten-banjo-s/m1873367177-eko-banjo-5-snaar
https://www.marktplaats.nl/v/muziek-en-instrumenten/snaarinstrumenten-banjo-s/m1827533640-5-snarige-bluegrass-banjo

Groetjes uit Canada,

Bart.

Aug 17, 2022 - 12:24:14 AM

2489 posts since 2/4/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

Hi all!

And what about the Ibanez https://www.thomann.de/nl/ibanez_b200.htm

Last one is a Deering https://www.thomann.de/nl/deering_goodtime_openback.htm The Deering does not have a trust rod in the neck. 

 


If you're going to get an open back get the RK-OT25 rather than the lower spec Goodtime.

The Ibanez is interesting in that it is quite cheap for a banjo with a flathead tone ring. It's not going to be a great tone ring and the rim is unusual in that it is a block rim made of poplar which is not at all typical of Asain made banjos. I've only heard it in videos but it sounds ok and has much more of the bluegrass sound than banjos like the CC50 with multiply rims and rolled brass tone rings.

In your consideration of open back or resonator you said you have a small room. Resonator banjos especially those with flathead tone rings are louder and more likely to disturb others.

Aug 17, 2022 - 11:01:12 AM

Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

Hi all!

Thanks again for all the advice!

I think I have narrowed down my search to two banjo's:

- Gold Tone CC-50RP
- Recording King RK-OT25-BR

The GT is a resonator and the RK an open back banjo.

Now I will have two decide between these two banjo's ??

I have a fairly small room but playing guitar doesn't disturb the neighbors. Only when I want to play in the living room so overall volume won't be a real big issue. Only concern that I have will it be to loud for myself when playing upstairs in my room when I decide to get the resonator GT banjo? I really have no idea of the volume difference between a resonator and an open back banjo.

I am not going to buy a second hand banjo that's for sure.

Aug 17, 2022 - 11:11:22 AM

ChunoTheDog

Canada

1707 posts since 8/9/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

Hi all!

Thanks again for all the advice!

I think I have narrowed down my search to two banjo's:

- Gold Tone CC-50RP
- Recording King RK-OT25-BR

The GT is a resonator and the RK an open back banjo.

Now I will have two decide between these two banjo's ??

I have a fairly small room but playing guitar doesn't disturb the neighbors. Only when I want to play in the living room so overall volume won't be a real big issue. Only concern that I have will it be to loud for myself when playing upstairs in my room when I decide to get the resonator GT banjo? I really have no idea of the volume difference between a resonator and an open back banjo.

I am not going to buy a second hand banjo that's for sure.


You can teach yourself to pick a resonator banjo very quietly. It helps develop a wide dynamic range. Lots of people think bluegrass banjos must be picked at 100% volume every time. That is simply false.

2nd hand banjos can be a great value, btw.

Aug 17, 2022 - 12:19:55 PM

13596 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick

I think I have narrowed down my search to two banjo's:

- Gold Tone CC-50RP
- Recording King RK-OT25-BR

The GT is a resonator and the RK an open back banjo.

Now I will have two decide between these two banjo's ??


If you want to play bluegrass, do not get the RK-OT25. It has only 17 frets, instead of the 22 you'll want for bluegrass.  In place of the top 5 frets, the fretboard is recessed to be a "frailing scoop." That's a feature strictly for old-time/clawhammer players. It is useless for bluegrass. The loss of frets makes it detrimental. You may not play all the way up the neck right away. But you will venture up there eventually. There's a very common lick that needs the 21st fret of the 1st string. If you ever play in A with a capo at the 2nd fret, you'll need frets above 17 to play up-the-neck backup chords.

The RK-OT25 is a great banjo. Probably better made than the CC50. But it's wrong for bluegrass -- in my opinion.

I want to add a late opinion on the Harley Benton 55.  This banjo is made in a factory in Asia that makes structurally similar banjos sold around the world with different brands names for different importers. This banjo by appearance looks to me to be built of components similar to the previous version of RK-R20, Gold Tone BG150F and others the names of which I forget. Wood choice and decoration may be different but they have similar features: multi-ply rim, shoes, 24 hooks, notched tension hoop, 

Harley Benton is the "house brand" Thomann. This means Thomann deals directly with the Asian manufacturer, eliminating the importer and one round of mark-up. This is why Thomann can sell Harley Benton instruments at lower prices than other brands.

Am I certain that the Harley Benton 55 is the same banjo as others that cost more? No. But it may not be a terrible instrument.

Anyway, if you want to play bluegrass, you'll be better off with the Gold Tone CC50RP.  I have played Gold Tone CC50 and CC100 banjos in stores and find them to be well-made, good-sounding and easy playing. They're fun to play.  More important: This banjo won't be an obstacle. It will work with you -- not against you. It will serve you well until you decide you're ready for a more serious instrument. Or -- it could be all the banjo you ever need.

Good luck.

Aug 17, 2022 - 12:29:17 PM

2489 posts since 2/4/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Dutch_Nick


Only concern that I have will it be to loud for myself when playing upstairs in my room when I decide to get the resonator GT banjo? I really have no idea of the volume difference between a resonator and an open back banjo.
 


One thing to bear in mind with the CC50 is that it is easily convertible to open back. Just take off the resonator. It would be an ok basic open back rather than a decent open back like the Recording King. It will be quieter than the fully fledged bluegrass banjo with flathead tone ring.

Aug 17, 2022 - 12:31:39 PM

2489 posts since 2/4/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Old Hickory

If you want to play bluegrass, do not get the RK-OT25. It has only 17 frets,

 

It has 22 frets. Shops have no clue.

Anyway it's now out of stock at Thomann.

Aug 17, 2022 - 1:29:35 PM

dutchtenor

Netherlands

34 posts since 7/6/2011

Hallo Nick, ik ben een 4 stringer uit Breda. Kijk eens op de site van Guenter Amend banjo-world.com, die heeft af en toe -nu ook- redelijke en betaalbare 5 snarige te koop staan. Hij is in Dusseldorf gevestigd, niet te ver weg. Er staan er 2 al lang te koop, geen top instrumenten maar goed om te leren.
Succes!

ps ik denk dat je de twee voor 300,- kan kopen..

Edited by - dutchtenor on 08/17/2022 13:32:47

Aug 17, 2022 - 1:56:44 PM

Dutch_Nick

Netherlands

21 posts since 8/15/2022

quote:
Originally posted by dutchtenor

Hallo Nick, ik ben een 4 stringer uit Breda. Kijk eens op de site van Guenter Amend banjo-world.com, die heeft af en toe -nu ook- redelijke en betaalbare 5 snarige te koop staan. Hij is in Dusseldorf gevestigd, niet te ver weg. Er staan er 2 al lang te koop, geen top instrumenten maar goed om te leren.
Succes!

ps ik denk dat je de twee voor 300,- kan kopen..

Dank voor je antwoord!

Ik ga eens kijken op die site maar ik ben toch bang dat ik uiteindelijk toch iets beters wil. Ken mezelf en let enorm op afwerking. Dat moet gewoon goed zijn.

 


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