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Jul 30, 2022 - 6:52:59 AM
112 posts since 3/7/2011

Asking the experts again here. I recently purchased a new Enoch Tradesman 12" all Cherry. A very nice instrument but it sounded a bit "dry" compared to my All Walnut tradesman so I purchased a raw brass Dobson tone ring as I heard this was a plug and play modification. This is the first time I have ever had a head off of a banjo but the change went very smoothly, I had the foresight to purchase a drum dial a while ago, and watched a good youtube video made by Elderly Instruments about changing a head first. Everything was great until I noticed upon tuning it back up that the fretboard was not even across the edge of the tension hoop! I thought I must have got the head on wrong somehow even though I was very careful to tension it all evenly so I took it back off, checked that the tone ring sat flush and even on the pot and reinstalled it again, carefully and evenly tensioning it and it became evident that the same problem still existed? For some reason I tried turning the neck and it moved! Not easily mind you but it did turn a bit, enough so I was able to get it level with the tension hoop cutout and started checking everything. There is no gap between the pot and neck heel, the wedge on the dowel stick was tight when I pushed on it with my thumb, the end bolt on the other end of the dowel stick appears tight, there are no unusual gaps. I did NOT notice if the dowel stick turned as I twisted the neck unfortunately. I would think if the glue joint had failed in the dowel stick, which is highly unlikely, the neck would be flopping around under the string tension and gaps would appear? It has me spooked never the less. What is you all's opinion? It plays just fine now, there is a bit of wahwah with the neck but no more so that my Ode limited edition and it is not a dowel stick, I hear that is just due to the thin pots? I think that is the nature of these instruments.

So, I am puzzled and would love input from the experts on this! Thank you!

Edited by - Banjercat on 07/30/2022 06:55:11

Jul 30, 2022 - 7:01:39 AM
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4459 posts since 10/13/2005

No expert but my guess is that the wedge became loose during the "operation". Once you twisted and squared it back up, a tap on the wedge should firm it up. I'd put a small pice of wood on the tip of the wedge and lightly tap it with a small hammer. banjered

Jul 30, 2022 - 8:03:28 AM
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5521 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by banjered

...  Once you twisted and squared it back up, a tap on the wedge should firm it up. I'd put a small pice of wood on the tip of the wedge and lightly tap it with a small hammer. banjered


I keep a little rubber block that I use between the wedge and hammer head.

Jul 30, 2022 - 11:27:22 AM
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678 posts since 1/28/2011

quote:
Originally posted by mrphysics55
quote:
Originally posted by banjered

...  Once you twisted and squared it back up, a tap on the wedge should firm it up. I'd put a small pice of wood on the tip of the wedge and lightly tap it with a small hammer. banjered


I keep a little rubber block that I use between the wedge and hammer head.


Rubber absorbs most of the impact and makes it impossible to feel how hard to hit with the hammer.  Better to use a wood block as banjered suggests.

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