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Jun 29, 2022 - 8:29:32 AM
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n6xrf

USA

28 posts since 9/13/2016

Hello All

I am look for a good Ear Training Course.
I find when at Jams or classes, notes are played, but if I cannot the guitar, I do not know what sting or fret. Thinking that if I could recognize the note or cord, it would be helpful when trying to play at jams.
I do recognize high or lower notes/tomes, just not how to reproduce the sound.

thx

Mike

Jun 29, 2022 - 2:35:10 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

27555 posts since 8/3/2003

It's usually not necessary to identify the correct name for the note, just to be able to find that note on your particular instrument.

Rather than worrying about particular notes, listen for chords, learn to hear the chord changes. As long as you know what key you're in and what chord you're playing, the notes of the chord should be in harmony with what you're playing.

Lots of times I hear a new song, figure out the chord sequence, get a basic idea of the melody in my head and then just take a break, using the chord sequence as my guide to what note(s) I play. It's playing by ear and the best way to learn is by going to jams, listening, watching and learning.

Jun 29, 2022 - 3:51:36 PM
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112 posts since 8/31/2015

Training my ear is the single best decision I have ever made as a musician, bar none. I don't naturally have perfect pitch, but with the help of interval training I've developed exact relative pitch. Being able to immediately recognize intervals and chord progressions has vastly improved my musicianship and made learning new material almost effortless. If you can internalize this, you'll know exactly how to play a melody (and chord progressions) simply by hearing them, without ever touching your instrument (assuming you have a solid understanding of the way the fretboard is laid out). To me the most important part is memorizing the 12 intervals. It may seem like a  daunting task to memorize 12 intervals but it is completely attainable and a skill that every musician can and should develop. There are countless YouTube videos that show how to achieve this. Here's one: https://youtu.be/PhDIm_2qS5s

As a musician, your ear will always be the ultimate tool.

Hope this helps!

TD

Jun 30, 2022 - 3:25:35 AM

Greg Denton

Canada

80 posts since 10/5/2014

Here are a couple of free online apps with ear-training exercises
musictheory.net/exercises
teoria.com/

and the "functional ear-trainer" app which you can install on your phone (the free version is limited but still very useful).

And there's the Jack Hatfield book "You Can Teach Yourself Banjo by Ear"
goodreads.com/book/show/438879...jo-by-ear

Jun 30, 2022 - 3:26:41 AM

Greg Denton

Canada

80 posts since 10/5/2014

meant to add this link to "functional ear trainer" in my earlier post
apps.apple.com/ca/app/function...088761926

Jun 30, 2022 - 5:53:09 AM

76448 posts since 5/9/2007

By learning the 3 basic chord shapes it becomes easier to find the notes.

Jun 30, 2022 - 6:33:19 AM
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240 posts since 11/28/2006

Eddie Collins has a YouTube series on ear training

youtu.be/kzpHI3URZCI

Jun 30, 2022 - 10:06:49 AM
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76448 posts since 5/9/2007

A great way to help your ear playing is to play with good ear players.

Jun 30, 2022 - 8:57:12 PM

HarleyQ

USA

3204 posts since 1/31/2005

I once knew a fellow that had ears like a VW bug sitting on a hill with both doors open.
Would that be "Good Ears"??????

Jul 1, 2022 - 10:58:07 AM
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76448 posts since 5/9/2007

It's such a great feeling to automatically go to the right cords on songs you've never heard before.

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Aug 10, 2022 - 7:14:40 AM

76448 posts since 5/9/2007

One of the best compliments I heard my Dad say was "He's got a quick ear."

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