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Jun 27, 2022 - 6:34:03 PM

rcc56

USA

4324 posts since 2/20/2016

Went in for a few items for this week's pot of something.
Didn't need much, so I used one of those little hand-carry baskets.
Went through the self-checkout, and when I was done, shoved the basket to the base of the attendant's stand.
Picked up my bags and started to exit.

Young woman in a store uniform [not the attendant] approaches me and says: "Put the basket in the lobby."
I respond: "I'm paying you, you're not paying me."
She retorts: "Not my job."
I reply: "Well, it's not mine either."

I was a good boy.  I did maintain a slight smile.

And no, I didn't carry the basket to the lobby.
Neither do I feel the least bit guilty about it.

And by the way, they're no longer cleaning the baskets.

Edited by - rcc56 on 06/27/2022 18:55:23

Jun 27, 2022 - 6:48:53 PM

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

26168 posts since 6/25/2005

Lobby? In a grocery store?

Jun 27, 2022 - 6:57:37 PM
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rcc56

USA

4324 posts since 2/20/2016

I suppose I should have called it a breezeway.
Especially since in no way is this a high-class store.

I live in a land of chain-grocery corporate takeovers.
20 years ago, everything was Red Food. Bi-Lo came in and took over Red Food, then Food City took over Bi-Lo.

Red Food was passable. Bi-Lo lowered the bar. Too much. I hoped for improvement with Food City, but it didn't happen.

A older, and reasonably refined lady student of mine refers to them as "Food S---ty."

Edited by - rcc56 on 06/27/2022 19:08:43

Jun 27, 2022 - 7:12:03 PM

Owen

Canada

11395 posts since 6/5/2011

I occasionally use [but never abuse] my handicapped parking permit. I have it on the back of the visor with elastic bands and just flip the visor down when required.  Today, I guess some poor self-righteous schmuck must have thought they were only valid when hung from the mirror, as she apparently felt it necessary to point out to me that the stall I was in was for handicapped. So I pointed to the permit [in plain sight thru the windshield] and said, "Yes, you've got that exactly right."  

No longer cleaning baskets???  Even when they're dirty??  Is/was there ever any other valid reason?  wink

Jun 27, 2022 - 7:41:43 PM
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donc

Canada

6980 posts since 2/9/2010

It sounds like the attendant has a hard time realizing who is ultimately the boss. She may think she is a high ranking member or the staff but without a steady flow of satisfied customers there is no sales, no profit, and there will be no wages.

Jun 27, 2022 - 9:23:20 PM

chuckv97

Canada

65057 posts since 10/5/2013

I never carry my basket to the lobby/breezeway/entranceway/mud room.
As for cleaning them, for a while during virusitis days they had a lady wiping them down with sanitizer, now it’s back to baskets with drool, snot, and spilled buttermilk.

Jun 28, 2022 - 4:50:13 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

27537 posts since 8/3/2003

Where I live, many people just leave their baskets in the parking rather than walking a few steps to put them in a basket rack where they stay put when the wind blows (and blow it does here). That just irritates me so bad. How much trouble is it to take the empty basket to a designated spot?

As far as cleaning baskets, our stores don't do that any more, either. But, they do provide hand/basket cleaning wipes so you can wipe down whatever part of the basket you want to and also clean your hands afterward.

Jun 28, 2022 - 10:48:49 AM

4215 posts since 11/29/2005

Try being Gluten-sensitive and attempting to shop at ANY supermarket (and quite a few "health food" stores)!

An item or two here, a few more there, maybe a couple of duplicates at another.

Jun 28, 2022 - 11:08:26 AM
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csrat

USA

1152 posts since 9/14/2008

When I was a kid, I liked "Mr. Rogers". He sang a song about how everyone was "special". It was a good song, but even then I thought that wasn't possibly true. I got what he was trying to do, but where was the part of the song that talked about what makes people special? We are all unique, but we are not all special.

When I was 15, I saw Jesse Jackson speak in Kansas City, MO at a youth group convention for my church. He delivered his, "I am Somebody" speech. It was a call and response format where the kids were led by him saying, "I am", "Somebody". "I am strong", "I am (insert positive affirmation)", and it went on, without any description of what made a person these things and how to make these affirmations true.

I have an acquaintance who is a marriage counselor. She was telling me how psychologists and social scientists are looking at a theory regarding empty, positive affirmation in schools and in the lives of children in general. Evidently, we caused the "Participation Trophy Generation" by teaching children they ARE special, they ARE smart/wise, they ARE leaders, they ARE ... somebody ... we just didn't teach them what traits go along with these qualities. We didn't teach them how to be all these things. They already ARE all these things.

The result? Self-centered, entitled, narcissist behavior. You ever wonder why less and less teens were taking jobs at fast food joints, small retail shops, mowing lawns, sweeping up, delivering pizza, over the last 15-20 years? It's because they didn't have to. It was beneath them, and their parents backed them, by not teaching them otherwise and providing funds and resources to keep them happy / comfortable during those years. God didn't make Millennials, their parents did and that's why YOU need to return the basket to the airlock*.

* Space between the double doors at the entrance to most stores with outdoors access.

Jun 28, 2022 - 11:32:06 AM

kd8tzc

USA

392 posts since 4/11/2022

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

I occasionally use [but never abuse] my handicapped parking permit. I have it on the back of the visor with elastic bands and just flip the visor down when required.  Today, I guess some poor self-righteous schmuck must have thought they were only valid when hung from the mirror, as she apparently felt it necessary to point out to me that the stall I was in was for handicapped. So I pointed to the permit [in plain sight thru the windshield] and said, "Yes, you've got that exactly right."  

No longer cleaning baskets???  Even when they're dirty??  Is/was there ever any other valid reason?  wink


Owen, about 20 years ago, I had a major medical issue happen and it set me back quite hard.  I was only 30 years old at the time, and I had a temporary handicap permit (I won't go into the why, but I was lucky to be alive).  Anyhow, I recall one day, I parked in a handicap spot, had the handicap hanger where it should be, and then exited the car.  Some self appointed person who felt it was their job to enforce the parking laws in Ohio proceeded to run up to me and start screaming at me that I should be hauled into jail because I was parking in a handicap spot and I much have stolen the hanger.  They basically looked at me and said that since I was young, I could not possibly be handicapped at that point in time.  I was not proud that I needed to use the handicap spot, and my wife had to assist me to get in the store, but in their mind, only older folks or people who physically look handicaped should use that spot.

 

quote:
Originally posted by csrat

When I was a kid, I liked "Mr. Rogers". He sang a song about how everyone was "special". It was a good song, but even then I thought that wasn't possibly true. I got what he was trying to do, but where was the part of the song that talked about what makes people special? We are all unique, but we are not all special.

When I was 15, I saw Jesse Jackson speak in Kansas City, MO at a youth group convention for my church. He delivered his, "I am Somebody" speech. It was a call and response format where the kids were led by him saying, "I am", "Somebody". "I am strong", "I am (insert positive affirmation)", and it went on, without any description of what made a person these things and how to make these affirmations true.

I have an acquaintance who is a marriage counselor. She was telling me how psychologists and social scientists are looking at a theory regarding empty, positive affirmation in schools and in the lives of children in general. Evidently, we caused the "Participation Trophy Generation" by teaching children they ARE special, they ARE smart/wise, they ARE leaders, they ARE ... somebody ... we just didn't teach them what traits go along with these qualities. We didn't teach them how to be all these things. They already ARE all these things.

The result? Self-centered, entitled, narcissist behavior. You ever wonder why less and less teens were taking jobs at fast food joints, small retail shops, mowing lawns, sweeping up, delivering pizza, over the last 15-20 years? It's because they didn't have to. It was beneath them, and their parents backed them, by not teaching them otherwise and providing funds and resources to keep them happy / comfortable during those years. God didn't make Millennials, their parents did and that's why YOU need to return the basket to the airlock*.

* Space between the double doors at the entrance to most stores with outdoors access.


I have noticed this too Craig, and it is really frustrating.  One of the other things kids of that generation don't know is how to fail or lose with class/honor.  Everyone get's a medal, so nobody is a loser.  I'm sorry, but you need to learn how to lose in life.  You can't always win.  There can only be one #1 person in any given thing.  We should not have 24 Valedictorians at a High School Graduation (we shouldn't even have 2).

You are spot on about how they are self-centered entitled people (most are, not all).  I had asked one of the neighbor kids to cut my grass once, and he wanted me to pay him $100 to do it.  I only have 1/3 of an acre... when I was a kid, I would chart $10 for that... I know that there is inflation, but $100?  The kid was only 12 I believe.

When I was his age, I was mowing 10 - 12 lawns a week (in the spring sometimes twice a week) and charged $10/yard.  That included cutting the lawn, trimming around trees, sweeping up and clippings, and making sure the lawn looked nice and neat when I was done.  My parents provided for me what I needed (food, shelter, basic clothing) but anything else was on me once I turned about 11 or 12.  Kids these days don't have respect for hard work and they don't see it as an opportunity to build skills later in life.  Heck, they can't even make change!  I love when you go to the grocery store, and they ring up the bill, and say it is $15.47 and you have them a $20, and after they enter it, you say wait, and give them $20.50 and they have this blank look on their face.  One kid I remember had to call a manager to help him redo what he entered.  Another had to find a calculator to figure out what to give me.  I was trying to tell him how to count up, but he just couldn't grasp it.  Again, having a paper route may have helped these kids (then again, being allowed to use calculators in grade school doesn't help either).

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Jun 28, 2022 - 11:45:31 AM
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ChunoTheDog

Canada

1588 posts since 8/9/2019

Geez, if I saw a young fella with a handicap parking permit I would probably assume they were a veteran or something and I wouldn't even bat an eye, let alone start harassing them!

Some people are crazy.

Jun 28, 2022 - 12:35:18 PM
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heavy5

USA

2341 posts since 11/3/2016

quote:
Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

Geez, if I saw a young fella with a handicap parking permit I would probably assume they were a veteran or something and I wouldn't even bat an eye, let alone start harassing them!

Some people are crazy.


It's getting more difficult to tell them apart !

Jun 28, 2022 - 12:40:03 PM
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ChunoTheDog

Canada

1588 posts since 8/9/2019

quote:
Originally posted by heavy5
quote:
Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

Geez, if I saw a young fella with a handicap parking permit I would probably assume they were a veteran or something and I wouldn't even bat an eye, let alone start harassing them!

Some people are crazy.


It's getting more difficult to tell them apart !


The crazies or the veterans?? 

Jun 28, 2022 - 3:41:42 PM
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Brian T

Canada

19320 posts since 6/5/2008

I'll estimate that 1/2 my village has handicap parking tags for a single space outside each business.
At the library, the spot is as far from the front door as you can park in that block. No handrails on the stair step entrance.

Our grocery stores have a sort of a lobby with doors for winter. Go thru one set to get away from the 20 below and knock some snow off your boots then a second set of doors to get into the store.
In nice weather, many of the city stores can roll that stuff back for an open frontage.

Our liquor stores have the same double door sets but the exit doors are also a "rat trap" that lock up to catch shop-lifters.

When I could shop, I suppose the cane helped = I never got hassled by anybody for stumbling with a cart. I never "went in for a just few things," and a basket as it was too exhausting. The stores pay some kid to round up the carts scattered all over the parking lot. The baskets were stacked in several places, always one nearby (store admin planning fault to have only one).

Jun 28, 2022 - 3:48:59 PM

csrat

USA

1152 posts since 9/14/2008

quote:
Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

Geez, if I saw a young fella with a handicap parking permit I would probably assume they were a veteran or something and I wouldn't even bat an eye, let alone start harassing them!

Some people are crazy.


The way I look at it, I don't get to choose who parks in handicap spaces. The people that issue the permits do that. If they have the permit, that's all I can know. Same thing with people and support animals. The law doesn't provide me with a way of determining whose support animal is legit, 

That being said, I have taken pictures of cars that were parked in handicap spaces that didn't display a permit, license tag and all. Send them to the police with date and time stamp and on one occasion, a good look at the driver. 

There was a suburb near here that had volunteers, retired folk, that would drive around in marked cars that looked like police cars except no lights and the decal on the door said parking enforcement volunteer. The problem in that area was that bad. They would talk to folks about parking illegally in handicap spots and if they wouldn't move, they'd report them, that is, if they wouldn't accept the citation. They had to stop this when the people they talked to would regularly threaten the volunteers  with violence and aggressively chase them off. That's when I started taking pictures.

Jun 28, 2022 - 4:04:03 PM
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kww

USA

1750 posts since 6/21/2008

When I lived in Iowa, the HyVee had it right ... you weren't allowed to take the grocery cart out of the store. As you left, you gave it to the attendant, who gave you a number. When you drove to the pickup line, you traded your number for your groceries. No cart thefts, no carts smashing into cars, nobody having to trawl the parking lot for carts.

Jun 28, 2022 - 5:02:58 PM

ChunoTheDog

Canada

1588 posts since 8/9/2019

Around here now they got these shopping carts with RFID chips in them that lock up 2 wheels the second the cart gets X yards away from store property.

Doesn't really work as intended as you see a bunch of discarded carts left to rust like 60 yards from the parking lot and nobody goes to get them back....go figure.

Jun 28, 2022 - 7:45:25 PM
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csrat

USA

1152 posts since 9/14/2008

quote:
Originally posted by kww

When I lived in Iowa, the HyVee had it right ... you weren't allowed to take the grocery cart out of the store. As you left, you gave it to the attendant, who gave you a number. When you drove to the pickup line, you traded your number for your groceries. No cart thefts, no carts smashing into cars, nobody having to trawl the parking lot for carts.


I like the way Aldi's does it. If you want to use a cart, you need a quarter. Each cart has locking mechanism on the handle, with a short chain that has a small "key" on it that locks it to the cart in front of it when they are stacked together. Slide in a quarter, the "key" is released. When you're done with your cart, you stack it and slide the "key" into the cart ahead of you and you get your quarter back.

If you leave it in the parking lot, the next customer picks it up and gets a quarter. The carts are stacked under cover, and there are usually a couple of quarters lying on the ledge, for the occasional customer that finds nothing but nickels and dimes in his pocket.

Jun 28, 2022 - 8:11:29 PM

kww

USA

1750 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by csrat
quote:
Originally posted by kww

When I lived in Iowa, the HyVee had it right ... you weren't allowed to take the grocery cart out of the store. As you left, you gave it to the attendant, who gave you a number. When you drove to the pickup line, you traded your number for your groceries. No cart thefts, no carts smashing into cars, nobody having to trawl the parking lot for carts.


I like the way Aldi's does it. If you want to use a cart, you need a quarter. Each cart has locking mechanism on the handle, with a short chain that has a small "key" on it that locks it to the cart in front of it when they are stacked together. Slide in a quarter, the "key" is released. When you're done with your cart, you stack it and slide the "key" into the cart ahead of you and you get your quarter back.

If you leave it in the parking lot, the next customer picks it up and gets a quarter. The carts are stacked under cover, and there are usually a couple of quarters lying on the ledge, for the occasional customer that finds nothing but nickels and dimes in his pocket.


Every grocery I used in the UK had the same system, usually with one pound coins.

Jun 29, 2022 - 12:23:28 AM
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4290 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

Went in for a few items for this week's pot of something.
Didn't need much, so I used one of those little hand-carry baskets.
Went through the self-checkout, and when I was done, shoved the basket to the base of the attendant's stand.
Picked up my bags and started to exit.

Young woman in a store uniform [not the attendant] approaches me and says: "Put the basket in the lobby."
I respond: "I'm paying you, you're not paying me."
She retorts: "Not my job."
I reply: "Well, it's not mine either."

I was a good boy.  I did maintain a slight smile.

And no, I didn't carry the basket to the lobby.
Neither do I feel the least bit guilty about it.

And by the way, they're no longer cleaning the baskets.


Well done on the sharp response Bob.  Typically for me, my cutting witty response to a situation like that would enter my head approximately 30 seconds after I had exited the store!

Jun 29, 2022 - 3:16:38 AM
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OM45GE

USA

116284 posts since 11/7/2007

It seems like common courtesy to return hand baskets and shopping carts to their designated areas. With hundreds of customers and a busy staff, if everyone just left their baskets and carts clerks would be spending lots of time on that instead of stocking shelves and working the checkout lines.

Jun 29, 2022 - 4:14:05 AM

4290 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by kww

Every grocery I used in the UK had the same system, usually with one pound coins.


Kevin, it tends to be the ones in town or accessible to residential areas by foot - ie the ones where the trolleys/carts can go walkabout.  

Jun 29, 2022 - 4:28:06 AM
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4290 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

Geez, if I saw a young fella with a handicap parking permit I would probably assume they were a veteran or something and I wouldn't even bat an eye, let alone start harassing them!

Some people are crazy.


Antoine, I've experienced this, I wouldn't say really frequently but more often than I'd prefer.  My wife uses a wheelchair/scooter.  In addition to designated disabled parking bays, our 'blue badge' allows us to park on stretches of road that are no parking allowed.  I tend to go for the street option mostly as being able bodied myself, it's a lot less hassle for me to unload/load the wheelchair and assist my wife and leave the designated bigger spaces for people who genuinely would struggle.  But, there have been quite a few times where say, I will go back to collect the car on my own to then pick my wife up from a nearby shop, when I've been confronted/challenged by a have a go hero pulling me up.  Initially, I used to explain, but now I'm a little bit more down to the point - my life is nowhere as near as tough as my wife's is - but I've decided between us that we have enough challenges and spending time explaining to someone who should know better isn't ever going to be one of them.

Jun 29, 2022 - 5:28:39 AM
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KCJones

USA

1750 posts since 8/30/2012

I refuse to use self-checkouts. Not my job.

That said, I will bag my own groceries. Because despite it not being my job, the employees that do it are so bad at their craft (and it is a craft) that I prefer to do it myself.

Jun 30, 2022 - 5:31:30 PM

mander

USA

4944 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

Went in for a few items for this week's pot of something.
Didn't need much, so I used one of those little hand-carry baskets.
Went through the self-checkout, and when I was done, shoved the basket to the base of the attendant's stand.
Picked up my bags and started to exit.

Young woman in a store uniform [not the attendant] approaches me and says: "Put the basket in the lobby."
I respond: "I'm paying you, you're not paying me."
She retorts: "Not my job."
I reply: "Well, it's not mine either."

I was a good boy.  I did maintain a slight smile.

And no, I didn't carry the basket to the lobby.
Neither do I feel the least bit guilty about it.

And by the way, they're no longer cleaning the baskets.


OMG! My boss would skin that person alive! 

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