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May 13, 2022 - 3:47:05 PM
10923 posts since 8/22/2006

I went to buy what I thought were 2x4s from the Orange box store. When I got home and measured the length I was concerned. They were not 96 inches. 92 1/2 apparently the mills are short cutting the studs. When the top plate usually doubled 2xs and the bottom plate usually single 2xs the total overall length equal the eight feet. The new dimensions of a 2x4 are 3 1/2 x 1 1/2 that’s what the little tag said stapled to the stud that I did not read until I got concerned about the length. Apparently this may be why the lumber industry had a shortage? To use up all the old stock then start producing the new dimensional lumber?

May 13, 2022 - 4:21:54 PM

13147 posts since 6/2/2008

I have not yet encountered boards not being the full listed length. I bought several pressure-treated boards in the past two weeks.  All were as long as listed. Or even a bit longer.

But 1-1/2 x 3-1/2 has been the milled size of nominal 2x4 for decades. All dimensional lumber is less than the nominal size.

I'd take the board back to Home Depot and exchange it for one that's a full 8 feet.

May 13, 2022 - 4:31:25 PM

Owen

Canada

10953 posts since 6/5/2011
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Those dimensions ^^ for planed lumber are what I've been accustomed to for a l-o-n-g time, although I seem to recall a thickness of 1 9/16" for a 2x4 at some point or other many moons ago.   

[Can't say for sure,  maybe I just dreamed up that 1 9/16"..... anybody else have the same "dream"?]    

May 13, 2022 - 5:37:02 PM
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Brian T

Canada

19205 posts since 6/5/2008
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Those are stud-length 2x4 meant for stick construction. Add the horizontal 2x4's and you get 96 inches. The deal is, the stud-length is classed as a "value added" forest product for duty purposes in the Softwood Lumber Agreement.

I can't buy an 8' 2x4 (SPF) anywhere in the central interior anymore.
You need 8 feet? You buy a 10' and cut it. Too bad if you don't like that.

If I drive to any one of half a dozen mills less than 30 miles away, I can buy an honest
rough cut dimension 2x4 if I need it. Green as grass and sopping wet.
You can listen to them shrink as they dry. Phosphate-coated spikes just about glue your job together.

May 13, 2022 - 6:18:39 PM
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dat

USA

31877 posts since 7/26/2006

We can still get 8 ft 4 by 2’s, but the stud length is displayed at the front of the store, they sell those stud length to save you time on cutting , and them money for selling for the same price

May 13, 2022 - 7:53:35 PM

10923 posts since 8/22/2006

How would hanging drywall be done different if the drywall is still 4ftx8ft or 4x10 some drywall hangers place them horizontally. Stacking two 4 footers on top of each other doesn’t leave room for flooring.

Haven't purchased drywall in awhile.

Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 05/13/2022 19:55:20

May 13, 2022 - 8:02:42 PM
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Owen

Canada

10953 posts since 6/5/2011
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3 plates @ 1 1/2" = 4 1/2" + 92 5/8" "stud" length = 97 1/8"   An inch to spare .... I think. 

In any event, bear in mind my math is like they used to put on business letters: "E & O. E."

Edited by - Owen on 05/13/2022 20:13:38

May 13, 2022 - 10:07:51 PM
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3338 posts since 10/17/2009

This is not a new thing.

Where I grew up, if referred to as "studs", were assumed to mean 92 5/8" (it also referred to grade)

Actual 8 foot dimensional lumber was also available... for construction other than studs.

Of course didn't buy lumber from a WalMart... but from folks that knew differences of lumber, grades and uses... lumberyards.

BTW... what are you constructing? If studs for wall, then those are what you probably want.

Edited by - banjoak on 05/13/2022 22:14:18

May 13, 2022 - 10:29:51 PM

3338 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

How would hanging drywall be done different if the drywall is still 4ftx8ft or 4x10 some drywall hangers place them horizontally. Stacking two 4 footers on top of each other doesn’t leave room for flooring.

Haven't purchased drywall in awhile.


Stacking two 4 footers is 8 foot... the same.

Horizontal has some advantages. One is vertical, tape/mud joint needs to be center of where a stud (not free floating between); [don't assume studs are going to always be perfect 16" OC.]  As horizontal the joint is perpendicular, so doesn't have to deal with that. Another is that drywall comes in 10 and 12 foot lengths, so if longer wall can mean just one joint along length, vs multiple 4ft.   Some folks think the horizontal hides poor (DiY folks)  taping/mud better; or less noticeable. The downside is if length would require a butt joint.

Edited by - banjoak on 05/13/2022 22:39:29

May 14, 2022 - 5:43:57 AM

10923 posts since 8/22/2006

“ BTW... what are you constructing? If studs for wall, then those are what you probably want.”

I was putting up nailers in the corners of a building we had built on site. A metal portable and the framers if you can call them that did not put anything in the corner to attach wall covering where the walls meet. There would have been no support in the corner on the longest walls. The studs worked but when I laid out the length on the new boards the difference of a 8ft stud exposed itself. Paid for an 8 footer got the shorter one.

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May 16, 2022 - 5:57:57 PM

1051 posts since 3/7/2006

2"x4" Nominal sized lumber was changed years ago by the lumber industry. lso, they are available full length or in what is called pre-cut studs. Builders who want 8' walls, knowing they need a top and bottom plate configuration prefer time savings of not having to cut down full length 8' boards.

Just FYI, there are no 1/2" or 3/4" sheets of plywood. Those have been nominalized too, to cut thickness and price.

And if you're planning on laying an 8" length of brick, it's not 8", but cut down in height, width and length so the mortar will bring the "unit" back to the proper installed dimensions. The same with an 8"x16" concrete block.

There's all kinds of stuff like this in the construction industry.

May 16, 2022 - 8:29:05 PM

1971 posts since 2/10/2003

You bought stud 2x4s, which as mentioned previously, are cut shorter then 8ft, so with the plates you end up at an 8ft wall. Home Depot sells both, stud length and full 8ft length and from what I recall the studs are a little more expensive then the 8 footers due to them already being cut for you. So you either pay a little more to save some time or a little less and spend time cutting them down.

May 16, 2022 - 8:38:13 PM

1971 posts since 2/10/2003

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

“ BTW... what are you constructing? If studs for wall, then those are what you probably want.”

I was putting up nailers in the corners of a building we had built on site. A metal portable and the framers if you can call them that did not put anything in the corner to attach wall covering where the walls meet. There would have been no support in the corner on the longest walls. The studs worked but when I laid out the length on the new boards the difference of a 8ft stud exposed itself. Paid for an 8 footer got the shorter one.


They have metal and or plastic clips for that. With the price of lumber, I would have gone that route. 

May 17, 2022 - 2:40:07 PM
Players Union Member

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

12090 posts since 2/22/2007

I purchased 8 8' 2x4s this week, and some are exactly 96" and some are 96.5", which threw me a curve when I cut one in half thinking I would get an even 4' but that was not the case and I had to trim it. But none were shorter than 96". I asked the man in the lumbar yard for eight footers and that is what he loaded out.

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