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Nov 24, 2021 - 7:02:25 AM
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4205 posts since 12/3/2008

I'm always inspired by exploring the tone colors of the cello banjo. It has a distinctly different sound and tactility from a normal banjo, providing different strokes for different folks. I became enraptured with both the 5-string and 4-string versions when Gold Tone brought these beasts back to life; and this is what gave rise to my affiliation with the company.

"Wild Geese Flying" is an original composition in pentatonic scale D F G A C D.
Tuning: f C G C D
Style: 3-finger picking

My Gold Tone retail site is http://banjocrazy.com


Nov 24, 2021 - 9:45:35 AM
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2816 posts since 12/21/2003

Beautiful Paul. Reminds me of some trad Chinese music.

Nov 24, 2021 - 1:27:39 PM

2195 posts since 1/21/2003

That's the type of tune made for the CB. As always a nice composition and fine playing Paul.

Nov 24, 2021 - 10:48:11 PM
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6766 posts since 6/27/2009

When I look way up
And the flock moves gracefully
I am there with them


There — you inspired haiku, Paul!

Nov 25, 2021 - 6:09:29 PM
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4205 posts since 12/3/2008

@catty
Thanks so much for your comment. It reminds me of traditional Chinese music, too. Have you ever played the guzheng?

@rickhayes
Thanks for your kind remarks. I'm delighted you think my tune suits the cello banjo. Playing the instrument, I feel immersed in the warmth of vibrations that beckon me to dive deeper into tonal expression.

@JanetB
Water rIpples on Lake Ukiah
Connecting kindred spirits
Far and near

There, you inspired a ukiah!

Edited by - Paul Roberts on 11/25/2021 18:10:54

Nov 28, 2021 - 8:06:31 PM

7384 posts since 11/4/2005

A truly beautiful tune, magical and mystical. The tone you are caressing out if that cello banjo reminds me of the tone Adam Hurt got from the gourd banjo on the Earth Tones CD. Exquisite. These tunes of yours will be floating in the air around you when you breath your last.

Edited by - Don Borchelt on 11/28/2021 20:07:50

Nov 30, 2021 - 7:33:58 PM

4205 posts since 12/3/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Don Borchelt

A truly beautiful tune, magical and mystical. The tone you are caressing out if that cello banjo reminds me of the tone Adam Hurt got from the gourd banjo on the Earth Tones CD. Exquisite. These tunes of yours will be floating in the air around you when you breath your last.


@Don Borchelt

Truth is, Don, no one's opinion means more to me than yours. Your comment makes me want to keep  breathing...and continue searching for tones to caress. 

Dec 7, 2021 - 8:44:59 AM

Noodlin

USA

94 posts since 6/3/2019

Wow, Paul. Beautiful and soothing. And I had some wild geese flying over my head on their way south during the middle of the playback.

Love the subtle tones here and the pace lets you hear the resonances in play. You have harmonics interspersed throughout as well, is that correct? Cello banjos are such a joy to play and hear.

Dec 10, 2021 - 7:20:05 PM
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4205 posts since 12/3/2008

@Noodlin

Yes, in "Geese" I'm employing a recurring harmonics part. Using the pentatonic scale (D F G A C D), and tuning the strings "f C G C D". It's a lot of fun to discover where those 5 notes land on the fingerboard, and compose a tune, using only those 5 notes.

Listening to cello banjos, it's immediately apparent how the subtle tones and resonances, due to a 14" rim and wound nylon strings, really sets this instrument apart from a banjo tuned in what we call "standard" range.

In my interview with Béla Fleck about the Missing Link baritone banjo, I point out that banjos in the 19th century were generally tuned a fourth below today’s standard banjo tuning. In the 1890s, the standard went from dGDF#A up to gCGBD. Béla Fleck pitches his baritone, the Gold Tone ML-1, at C... so two steps higher than the typical 19th century range, a fifth below modern standard range.

These days cello banjos are often tuned octave G/C, or octave A/D; an octave below standard-tuned banjos. I've had it down to E. I've heard take it up to standard, and just a few notes below standard. So the range for experimentation is enormous 

The Cello Banjo is an exotic musical dinosaur, restored to a new life. I'm glad it left behind enough DNA to assist its reentry.
 

Edited by - Paul Roberts on 12/10/2021 19:36:18

Dec 11, 2021 - 12:36:49 PM

Noodlin

USA

94 posts since 6/3/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Paul Roberts

@Noodlin

Yes, in "Geese" I'm employing a recurring harmonics part. Using the pentatonic scale (D F G A C D), and tuning the strings "f C G C D". It's a lot of fun to discover where those 5 notes land on the fingerboard, and compose a tune, using only those 5 notes.

Listening to cello banjos, it's immediately apparent how the subtle tones and resonances, due to a 14" rim and wound nylon strings, really sets this instrument apart from a banjo tuned in what we call "standard" range.

In my interview with Béla Fleck about the Missing Link baritone banjo, I point out that banjos in the 19th century were generally tuned a fourth below today’s standard banjo tuning. In the 1890s, the standard went from dGDF#A up to gCGBD. Béla Fleck pitches his baritone, the Gold Tone ML-1, at C... so two steps higher than the typical 19th century range, a fifth below modern standard range.

These days cello banjos are often tuned octave G/C, or octave A/D; an octave below standard-tuned banjos. I've had it down to E. I've heard take it up to standard, and just a few notes below standard. So the range for experimentation is enormous 

The Cello Banjo is an exotic musical dinosaur, restored to a new life. I'm glad it left behind enough DNA to assist its reentry.
 


Very interesting, Paul, thank you for sharing!  I have my cello banjo tuned to A currently, and it seems pretty happy there. It's a 6string as well, with the extra bass string being an octave below the 3rd string- aAEAC#E. It's a lot of fun to experiment with incorporating the low bass string into arrangements, though I'm not great at it yet. 
 

The fretless banjo I just finished building is in "minstrel tuning" which I suspect is what you're saying was the original typical tuning of those 1800s banjos- Open D. Sounds great, I find the lower tuning ranges to be quite compelling. 

Edited by - Noodlin on 12/11/2021 12:38:04

Dec 11, 2021 - 2:58:23 PM

4205 posts since 12/3/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Noodlin
quote:
Originally posted by Paul Roberts

@Noodlin

Yes, in "Geese" I'm employing a recurring harmonics part. Using the pentatonic scale (D F G A C D), and tuning the strings "f C G C D". It's a lot of fun to discover where those 5 notes land on the fingerboard, and compose a tune, using only those 5 notes.

Listening to cello banjos, it's immediately apparent how the subtle tones and resonances, due to a 14" rim and wound nylon strings, really sets this instrument apart from a banjo tuned in what we call "standard" range.

In my interview with Béla Fleck about the Missing Link baritone banjo, I point out that banjos in the 19th century were generally tuned a fourth below today’s standard banjo tuning. In the 1890s, the standard went from dGDF#A up to gCGBD. Béla Fleck pitches his baritone, the Gold Tone ML-1, at C... so two steps higher than the typical 19th century range, a fifth below modern standard range.

These days cello banjos are often tuned octave G/C, or octave A/D; an octave below standard-tuned banjos. I've had it down to E. I've heard take it up to standard, and just a few notes below standard. So the range for experimentation is enormous 

The Cello Banjo is an exotic musical dinosaur, restored to a new life. I'm glad it left behind enough DNA to assist its reentry.
 


Very interesting, Paul, thank you for sharing!  I have my cello banjo tuned to A currently, and it seems pretty happy there. It's a 6string as well, with the extra bass string being an octave below the 3rd string- aAEAC#E. It's a lot of fun to experiment with incorporating the low bass string into arrangements, though I'm not great at it yet. 
 

The fretless banjo I just finished building is in "minstrel tuning" which I suspect is what you're saying was the original typical tuning of those 1800s banjos- Open D. Sounds great, I find the lower tuning ranges to be quite compelling. 


@Noodlin

Is what you have a Gold Tone OT-6 'Lojo' 6-string banjo? 

Dec 11, 2021 - 3:13:21 PM

Noodlin

USA

94 posts since 6/3/2019

 

@Noodlin

Is what you have a Gold Tone OT-6 'Lojo' 6-string banjo? 



Love the concept of the Lojo!  Too cool!

Mine was my first foray into participating in building- it's the Carver Banjos tackhead cello banjo kit. For the cost of entry, it has been a ton of fun, and spurred me to get into woodworking in general. 
 

This is the only video I've uploaded with it, but it will give you the general idea

https://youtu.be/Vfl5atGR6Bw

Edited by - Noodlin on 12/11/2021 15:23:48

Dec 11, 2021 - 6:45:41 PM
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4205 posts since 12/3/2008

@Noodlin
I've got a nice frame drum with a really tight skin, which might make for a good banjo, although I'd vote for a tunable drum.

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