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Nov 11, 2021 - 8:33:42 AM
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Ondrej

Czech Republic

183 posts since 11/15/2018

Bitonality is the use of only two different keys at the same time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytonality

 

 "Oh My Darling Clementine"

standard harmonized 00:00 Melody A major, Backup A major reharmonized with using of bitonality 00:22 Melody A major, Backup F major


Nov 11, 2021 - 11:12:29 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26694 posts since 8/3/2003

No offense meant to your playing but that second part was pretty bad, and didn't sound harmonized at all, just dissonant. Perhaps others would like it, and I mean no disrespect, just not my type of sound.

Nov 12, 2021 - 2:09:41 AM

Ondrej

Czech Republic

183 posts since 11/15/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

No offense meant to your playing but that second part was pretty bad, and didn't sound harmonized at all, just dissonant. Perhaps others would like it, and I mean no disrespect, just not my type of sound.


Thanks for the feedback. I wasn't offended. I admit that not everyone likes bitonaila.
Nov 12, 2021 - 2:11:23 AM
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Ondrej

Czech Republic

183 posts since 11/15/2018

"Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star"
standard harmonized 00:00
Melody G major, Backup G major
reharmonized with using of bitonality 00:29
Melody G major, Backup Eb major


Nov 12, 2021 - 7:08:14 AM
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9176 posts since 8/28/2013

Bi-tonaliy, polytonality, and atonality can be somewhat of an acquired taste, and can be difficult for traditionalists. I happened to like these, but I have listened to this sort of thing perhaps more than others. I think it's fine that you have posted this, and I hope that more people are inspired by your original banjo thinking.

Nov 12, 2021 - 5:24:52 PM

434 posts since 10/8/2018

OK, I try to be openminded, but somehow “bitonality” reminds me of this classic Spinal Tap sketch…

youtube.com/watch?v=dugM2JV3Vjg

Nov 12, 2021 - 8:20:29 PM
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121 posts since 5/8/2021

Anytime somebody scares off a bluegrass musician with music theory is a good day for me. Although sadly, anything outside of tonic, dominant, and subdominant is enough to scare them.

I'm a big fan of polytonality. William Schuman ends his Third Symphony with a C major/E flat major tonality, and it's just glorious.

Nov 13, 2021 - 2:39:49 PM
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434 posts since 10/8/2018

You have reminded me of an old musical joke...

The bluegrass guitar player decides to take a jazz guitar lesson.

"Why don't we start by playing a blues in C?" says the jazz guitar teacher.

The bluegrass player agrees, and they start to jam.

But soon the teacher says, "Great! But don't stay on the C chord... go to the subdominant!"

To which the bluegrass guitar player replies, "But this IS the subdominant!"

Edited by - guitarbanjoman on 11/13/2021 14:40:47

Nov 15, 2021 - 11:58:01 AM

Ondrej

Czech Republic

183 posts since 11/15/2018

Thank you for all the reactions. Little did I know that bitonality was so well known.

Nov 15, 2021 - 1:47:07 PM
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434 posts since 10/8/2018

Ondrej, you might also dig this…

youtube.com/watch?v=heISdRNnEnw

Nov 18, 2021 - 7:11:18 AM
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186 posts since 11/8/2014

quote:
Originally posted by struggle_bus

Anytime somebody scares off a bluegrass musician with music theory is a good day for me. Although sadly, anything outside of tonic, dominant, and subdominant is enough to scare them.

I'm a big fan of polytonality. William Schuman ends his Third Symphony with a C major/E flat major tonality, and it's just glorious.


LOL   Thank you

Ondrej,  Thank you.   Keep posting

Edited by - chas5131 on 11/18/2021 07:12:58

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