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Deering Goodtime vs Gold Tone AC-1 - Is the extra money worth it?

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Oct 24, 2021 - 1:20:40 PM
28 posts since 10/23/2021

Hello :)

My first post so thank you kindly to the people who run the forum. I've been lurking for a little while and this place really does cover so many things.

I'm looking to buy my first banjo [probably left hand...] and I think I've narrowed it down to the Gold Tone AC-1 or the Deering Goodtime. I want one with an open back as I'm planning to focus on clawhammer as I really dig the old-time tunes and the sound that comes with that tradition.

The Goodtime is quite a bit more expensive than the Gold Tone, about $170 depending on where I get it. The rim of the AC-1 is a composite construction and I'd much prefer a wooden rim, mainly from an aesthetic point of view, but then it's cheaper than the Deering.

So is it worth paying the extra for the Deering Goodtime? Is the difference really enough to warrant the extra outlay?

I've played the piano for about seven years but never a fretted instrument ever, so it's kind of a steep learning curve.

Thanks for reading!

Rich

Edited by - Banjo Rich on 10/24/2021 13:22:44

Oct 24, 2021 - 1:40:14 PM
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18 posts since 12/20/2018

Hi, I've owned both. My first banjo was the AC-1, and it was definitely a decent little banjo. After 4 months of playing it I was able to purchase Goodtime 2 that was used, and overall it was an excellent banjo. I've been playing (at) the banjo almost 3 years now and have since been able to purchase an even nicer banjo.

If you can afford it, my opinion is that the Deering will sound better and hold it's resale value better. Good luck and enjoy your banjo, whichever one you end up with.

Oct 24, 2021 - 1:50:50 PM
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1648 posts since 2/9/2007

Search the forums. This topic is a perennial one on the Hangout.

My vote is for the Gold Tone. but.. If you're considering spending the price of a new Goodtime, I'd say check out the Recording King Madison open-back, which is about the same price, but IMO much more banjo. Not sure if it's available as a lefty, though.

Oct 24, 2021 - 2:08:13 PM
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1 posts since 3/31/2021

I bought my first, an AC-1, about 6 months ago. I added the resonator kit/back which went on easily. Added a Gold Tone arm rest... I am quite happy with it. Have about 325 in t total which is nice. My primary instrument is my Taylor guitar which I have 5 times as much in. Eventually I may upgrade but not until I learn a bit more. Its all personal choice.

Oct 24, 2021 - 2:18:36 PM
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100 posts since 5/8/2021

For what you get and what they cost, I honestly have no clue why anybody would buy a Deering Good Time.

If having something made in the USA is important to you, then maybe, but if it's a Good Time, chances are it won't be your last banjo. And for a beginning banjo, I'm not too concerned with the country of origin.

Oct 24, 2021 - 4:13:35 PM
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12424 posts since 6/2/2008

What Scott said.

Look at a Recording King "Madison" RK-OT25 open back. $600 new. At places other than this seller, you might get a free gig bag and free shipping.

Deering Goodtime open back. $529 new. 

The RK-OT25 is way more than $71 better than a Goodtime. For the extra money you get: thick, notched tension hoop; 24 round hooks; separate fingerboard glued to the neck; 2-way adjustable truss rod inside neck; two coordinator rods inside pot; planetary tuning pegs.

If it's available left-handed, it's much more instrument. For not much more than a Goodtime, it can be not only your first banjo, but your last banjo.

Edited by - Old Hickory on 10/24/2021 16:20:53

Oct 25, 2021 - 2:46:11 AM
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Players Union Member

Helix

USA

14796 posts since 8/30/2006

The piano will help you rearrange your music lab upstairs in yer brain.
You'll be using the trig in your wrist to learn many new things and patterns.

Oct 25, 2021 - 3:27:46 AM
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2057 posts since 2/4/2013

If I had this choice and the budget I'd get the Goodtime although I'm not really a fan. But I agree with Ken I'd save hard for the Recording King RK-OT25.

Oct 25, 2021 - 3:34:47 AM
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PaulRF

Australia

3256 posts since 2/1/2012

quote:
Originally posted by planeman2010

Hi, I've owned both. My first banjo was the AC-1, and it was definitely a decent little banjo. After 4 months of playing it I was able to purchase Goodtime 2 that was used, and overall it was an excellent banjo. I've been playing (at) the banjo almost 3 years now and have since been able to purchase an even nicer banjo.

If you can afford it, my opinion is that the Deering will sound better and hold it's resale value better. Good luck and enjoy your banjo, whichever one you end up with.


I have had both a Gold Tone and a Goodtime and whilst the Gold Tone was well made and had more features than the Good Time I preferred the Good Time as I liked the sound more and the neck to me was so much easier to play.  Just my 2 cents worth.  If a RK in that price range was available in a lefty then I may have purchased one at the time.
Paul

Edited by - PaulRF on 10/25/2021 03:36:08

Oct 25, 2021 - 4:19:24 AM
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conic

England

925 posts since 2/15/2014

I have the goodtime 2 with resonator removed. I also got an RK35 but cant easily convert to openback due to the flange not being removable unless you get a flange plate so I bought an RK20 which can easily be converted removing the resonator and flange plate and plays really well
I have been using my goodtime for 7 years and is now the only one I use, its a great banjo, quality build and great sound and very lightweight.
P.S, I started off playing clawhammer/ two finger and seeger up picking but now I play mainly bluegrass so have the skin tightened to near breaking point for a great tone.

Oct 25, 2021 - 4:21:17 AM
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6564 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich

Hello :)

My first post so thank you kindly to the people who run the forum. I've been lurking for a little while and this place really does cover so many things.

I'm looking to buy my first banjo [probably left hand...] and I think I've narrowed it down to the Gold Tone AC-1 or the Deering Goodtime. I want one with an open back as I'm planning to focus on clawhammer as I really dig the old-time tunes and the sound that comes with that tradition.

The Goodtime is quite a bit more expensive than the Gold Tone, about $170 depending on where I get it. The rim of the AC-1 is a composite construction and I'd much prefer a wooden rim, mainly from an aesthetic point of view, but then it's cheaper than the Deering.

So is it worth paying the extra for the Deering Goodtime? Is the difference really enough to warrant the extra outlay?

I've played the piano for about seven years but never a fretted instrument ever, so it's kind of a steep learning curve.

Thanks for reading!

Rich


Is your piano keyboard reversed?  Are the low keys on the right?

Oct 25, 2021 - 6:25:40 AM
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28 posts since 10/23/2021

Thanks for the replies. Much appreciated! It seems the jury's out on the Goodtime with some liking it a lot and a few guys thinking it's expensive for what you get. I can get one used cheaper but probably not a left-handed version. The Recording King RK-OT25 is a lovely looking thing though, isn't it. But it doesn't come as a lefty - If I had the cash I'd get the Deering Artisan open back.

Yeah, the left-handed thing... I've read so much on this forum about the merits [or not] of getting a left-handed instrument. I don't feel much wiser than I did before I started looking a couple of months back.

I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.

But as so many people have said, there's a much bigger range of banjos available is you play right-handed and maybe I'll get used to it. Other than buying a right-handed banjo and seeing how it goes, I don't see how I can know.

Anyway, thank you all again for the replies and input.

Rich

Oct 25, 2021 - 7:13:23 AM
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Banjo Lefty

Canada

2401 posts since 6/19/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich

Thanks for the replies. Much appreciated! It seems the jury's out on the Goodtime with some liking it a lot and a few guys thinking it's expensive for what you get. I can get one used cheaper but probably not a left-handed version. The Recording King RK-OT25 is a lovely looking thing though, isn't it. But it doesn't come as a lefty - If I had the cash I'd get the Deering Artisan open back.

Yeah, the left-handed thing... I've read so much on this forum about the merits [or not] of getting a left-handed instrument. I don't feel much wiser than I did before I started looking a couple of months back.

I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.

But as so many people have said, there's a much bigger range of banjos available is you play right-handed and maybe I'll get used to it. Other than buying a right-handed banjo and seeing how it goes, I don't see how I can know.

Anyway, thank you all again for the replies and input.

Rich


Only you can know just how left-handed you are.  If, like me, you are at the extreme end of the spectrum, then do yourself a favour and insist on a left-handed instrument.  You will hear from lots of people who will tell you that if you've never played a fretted instrument before, it's "just as easy" to learn to play right-handed, or "both hands have to do something," or, like Joel said "you play a right handed piano, don't you?"  Don't listen to any of it: it's all bunk.

Stringed instruments (excluding the piano) are made the way they are in order to favour right-handed people, so that the dominant hand plays rhythm and the subdominant plays melody.  This is because rhythm is much more important than melody.  If any of the above were correct, you would see many right-handed people playing left-handed instruments, which never happens unless there's some physical disability which forces the lefty on them.  If your dominant hand is your left, then it should be picking, and your right hand should be fretting.

The piano is a special case.  The bass notes are on the left because that's the way we read the alphabet -- left to right.  The lowest piano key is an A, and the rest follow up from there.  There's no particular musical reason why this happened, but it did, and it presents an advantage to a lefty pianist because so much piano music has the rhythm in the bass.

Oct 25, 2021 - 7:14:08 AM
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Banjo Lefty

Canada

2401 posts since 6/19/2014

Of course, if you are in any way ambidextrous, then you can safely ignore what I just said.

Oct 25, 2021 - 7:31:21 AM
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Bart Veerman

Canada

5074 posts since 1/5/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich


Yeah, the left-handed thing... ~ ~ ~ I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.


 

Your body and brain have spoken, listen to them! All other opinions on this matter are anecdotal at best...

Oct 25, 2021 - 9:12:49 AM

705 posts since 10/9/2017

Having recently played an AC-1 and having plenty of experience with the Goodtime, I'd say that the AC-1 is 80% of the banjo for 40% of the price (based on US retail prices). If you keep on with the instrument you'll likely want to upgrade and you'll have spent less in the first instance so could have more to spend on the new one - assuming you haven't already spent on cigarettes, and whisky and wild, wild women.

If you can get to north London with any ease, you might want to check out this banjo at J.A. Turner. At £145 it's cheaper than ether and the seller will have set it up properly.

Oct 25, 2021 - 3:48:18 PM

28 posts since 10/23/2021

 
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty
Only you can know just how left-handed you are.  If, like me, you are at the extreme end of the spectrum, then do yourself a favour and insist on a left-handed instrument.  You will hear from lots of people who will tell you that if you've never played a fretted instrument before, it's "just as easy" to learn to play right-handed, or "both hands have to do something," or, like Joel said "you play a right handed piano, don't you?"  Don't listen to any of it: it's all bunk.

Stringed instruments (excluding the piano) are made the way they are in order to favour right-handed people, so that the dominant hand plays rhythm and the subdominant plays melody.  This is because rhythm is much more important than melody.  If any of the above were correct, you would see many right-handed people playing left-handed instruments, which never happens unless there's some physical disability which forces the lefty on them.  If your dominant hand is your left, then it should be picking, and your right hand should be fretting.

The piano is a special case.  The bass notes are on the left because that's the way we read the alphabet -- left to right.  The lowest piano key is an A, and the rest follow up from there.  There's no particular musical reason why this happened, but it did, and it presents an advantage to a lefty pianist because so much piano music has the rhythm in the bass.


Yeah, the piano is an odd one. I've always felt it was a bit of an advantage being left-handed as the bass clef stuff really drives the music, and many right-handed players have to work to build up the stamina. I like to think I've got a little dexterity in my right-hand now too so it's not like the RH would be coming in to the fretting stuff totally cold. It's already used to hitting [or missing] piano keys.

When I picked up the fake banjo I made with my left hand it felt totally natural to have my right hand up on the frets. I can pretend to strum/pick and fret on it really quickly when holding it left-handed. Flip it around though and it's just awkward. Like trying to tap your head and rub your stomach at the same time. It actually made me feel tense. Weird.

I'd love nothing more than to play it right-handed. I've read so many comments from lefty players who have succeeded in playing a righty banjo, and I totally believe them. It seems pig-headed to say "well they might've done it but I can't". It would be great to have easier access to used instruments and a wide range of makers. Ideally I'd try a right-handed banjo first but beyond buying one and trying it, I don't see how I can tell if I'll get on with it or not. I'd hope I could learn it right-handed, but I want learning it to be enjoyable, not something that feels like an obstacle that needs to be overcome right from the start. And based on my fake banjo, I think that's what might happen.

Sorry for the long reply. The left-handed issue is something that's bothered me for a while to the point where I thought about giving up even getting a banjo as I didn't know what to do. And the lack of new or used lefty banjos is a real bummer.

Thanks for the reply :)

Oct 25, 2021 - 3:58:27 PM

28 posts since 10/23/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Bart Veerman
quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich


Yeah, the left-handed thing... ~ ~ ~ I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.


 

Your body and brain have spoken, listen to them! All other opinions on this matter are anecdotal at best...


Yeah, my gut feeling is to get a left-handed instrument even though my head is saying 'don't be dumb. You're really restricting yourself for the future'... 

Oct 25, 2021 - 4:04:21 PM

28 posts since 10/23/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Remsleep

Having recently played an AC-1 and having plenty of experience with the Goodtime, I'd say that the AC-1 is 80% of the banjo for 40% of the price (based on US retail prices). If you keep on with the instrument you'll likely want to upgrade and you'll have spent less in the first instance so could have more to spend on the new one - assuming you haven't already spent on cigarettes, and whisky and wild, wild women.

If you can get to north London with any ease, you might want to check out this banjo at J.A. Turner. At £145 it's cheaper than ether and the seller will have set it up properly.


Thanks for the link! It's a nice-looking banjo and a decent price. Unfortunately I'm quite a way from London [think Land's End kind of distance]. I'm coming around to the Gold Tone AC-1 though. It's about my budget at the moment, plus I'll still have to get some accessories like a tuner, spare strings, etc. maybe a mute. The Deering Goodtime was more than I wanted to spend really but I thought it might be worth it if the difference was that noticeable to a total novice. I've never played a stringed instrument so I've no idea if I'll like it or hate it. I'll be a total beginner and the Gold Tone seems like something I can at least try out the basic stuff on without breaking the bank.

Oct 25, 2021 - 4:42:26 PM
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279 posts since 7/29/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich
 

The left-handed issue is something that's bothered me for a while to the point where I thought about giving up even getting a banjo as I didn't know what to do. And the lack of new or used lefty banjos is a real bummer.

Thanks for the reply :)


I am also a relatively new left-handed player.
I've noticed the lack of used lefty banjos and that some brands don't even make lefty banjos.  It made no difference in my decision to play left-handed.  For me the most important thing was to do what felt right.   Playing right handed never crossed my mind.
I'm currently playing a left-handed Goodtime.  I've been looking for a used lefty Deering Sierra with no luck yet.  I can wait for one to be listed or buy something new, and either way is better than playing right handed.
You already mentioned what felt right for you.  Don't worry about the rest.

Oct 25, 2021 - 5:05:52 PM
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Players Union Member

Helix

USA

14796 posts since 8/30/2006

Look for a Recording King/Music Link left handed 5 string product called Savannah #SB-100-L
24 bracket resonator banjo
Mahogany Resonator and neck left handed
Geared tuners/5th peg
$466.99 USD.  But I see $349.99 offered.
Find a recording king dealer over there
It’s a shoe banjo with a thin plate under the shoes. Remove the rez and plate to get a nice learning, upgradeable banjo
People customize these with art
Keep the parts and reassemble for resale once you play the uric acid out of it
I feel you have already prepared yourself by using both sides of the noggin to play piano
I became MORE ambidextrous 5 years ago by racing two HO 1/64 cars at the same time. I’m a lefty righty

You decide which one




Edited by - Helix on 10/25/2021 17:20:11

Oct 25, 2021 - 5:41:58 PM
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KCJones

USA

1527 posts since 8/30/2012

People will talk about how the Goodtime "doesn't offer much". This is based purely on the spec sheet. It doesn't have this or that feature that is a "required" component.

Personally, I've played nearly all of the Gold Tone and Recording King offerings at this level. And I'll say that the reason Goodtimes are more popular is because they feel better in your hands and sound better in your ears.

The Goodtime neck profile is so much nicer than the chunky GT and RK entry-level necks. It's not even close. 

The AC-1 is a plastic toy shaped like a banjo. 

Sure, Goodtimes lack some features on paper. But go sit down and play them side by side. I bet you walk away with a Goodtime.

Try to find a used on here on BHO. Post a wanted ad. I bet you can find one for $300.

This is all my opinion, of course.

Edited by - KCJones on 10/25/2021 17:45:09

Oct 25, 2021 - 6:03:20 PM
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Banjo Lefty

Canada

2401 posts since 6/19/2014

rquote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich
quote:
Originally posted by Bart Veerman
quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich


Yeah, the left-handed thing... ~ ~ ~ I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.


 

Your body and brain have spoken, listen to them! All other opinions on this matter are anecdotal at best...


Yeah, my gut feeling is to get a left-handed instrument even though my head is saying 'don't be dumb. You're really restricting yourself for the future'... 


Not dumb at all.  Remember that left-handedness is a spectrum affecting about 20% of the population, ranging from those who can do a little bit with their left hands, but mostly use their right, through those who are truly ambidextrous, all the way to those who can't do anything with their right hands.  People who tell you that they are left-handed but have learned to play righty for convenience are not likely in the latter group, but more probably fall somewhere along the middle of the line.

Also, you have to consider that, although righties have many more instruments from which to choose, in fact you only need one -- right now, that is, although BAS may set in at some time in the future -- and if the Goldtone AC is a lefty, you should buy it.  Goldtone offers lefty versions of all their instruments at no extra charge.  As a complete beginner, you are not going to be able to notice the subtle differences of tone offered by various brands and models; what you need is a half-way decent banjo on which you can learn to play (and the Goldtone is certainly that).  Later on, when you are ready for an upgrade, you can afford to get picky.

Oct 26, 2021 - 5:52:24 AM
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Helix

USA

14796 posts since 8/30/2006

I jam frequently with all the major brands. I'm a volunteer/board member of an acoustic music showcase where we see different types of banjo and human hands making handmade music.
The Goodtimes we have seen all give a certain voice : High attack, low sustain and high decay, I have not seen one used by a group. Nor have I seen one used by an expert.

It isn't Deering's product, we book Mean Mary, they can't complain.

The "other" imports and such with tones rings show: High attack, high sustain and low decay by different degrees.
Any O-scope or other similar device would be as useful as a drum dial is for many other players here.
Each banjo type will show characteristics that are reproduceable.

The CNC heel of necks produced by Deering do not allow the strap to hold the banjo while a performer might do something else during performance like sign language (ASL) for people who use it and those who are learning at the performance. Like when you see someone swing the banjo down around behind them.
The patented White Oak has the same heel as the entry level Goodtime.  It's all through the price points like round holes in the plate. 
So when the banjo is swung away to the side so one could sign with both hands :  the Deering heel lets the strap fall off, the whole banjo now unwraps from the strap and hangs upside down away from the performance.  It makes design for the masses really questionable.  The pickup goes crazy through the sound system.  VERY distracting.  Other agendas emerge to distance the builder from the using consumer. (guns?)

Ask the question:  How does this banjo operate at 6o mph, and why are simple things overlooked?

Pete Seeger and Michael Cooney used their longnecks as stage props, it's theater after all.  Collect money, row a boat, cook over a fire.

I dispute or disagree with how the Deering necks with that heel feel while playing.  It's a D profile.

I had the same problem with a Deering parlor banjo tuned down to G.  The 16 hook pattern puts a hook and shoe right where a shorter person would hit with their thumb.  The Heel allowed the strap to just slip off.  One person here suggested twice to use a strap lock which is not the solution at all.

So I built an 18 hook pattern and left the 18th hole blank, and put a hook on his heel to hold the strap.  They came to me with specific specs because of the limitations of factory sameness. One size plays all?  AND Deering would not sell him another loose neck, ok.

So that means Deering could reprogram their heels to be more user friendly, otherwise, I get more work in my shop and I don't take one little scrap from their table.  

I find case makers do this, they install the handle without actually carrying the banjo when it is off center or tilts the case.

So Mr. and Mrs. Deering, reprogram your neck heels to more efficiently promote your special offerings to the banjo community.  Please.




Oct 26, 2021 - 5:59:26 AM

6564 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty
quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Rich

Thanks for the replies. Much appreciated! It seems the jury's out on the Goodtime with some liking it a lot and a few guys thinking it's expensive for what you get. I can get one used cheaper but probably not a left-handed version. The Recording King RK-OT25 is a lovely looking thing though, isn't it. But it doesn't come as a lefty - If I had the cash I'd get the Deering Artisan open back.

Yeah, the left-handed thing... I've read so much on this forum about the merits [or not] of getting a left-handed instrument. I don't feel much wiser than I did before I started looking a couple of months back.

I've never even picked up a fretted instrument before. I made one up out of a yard-stick and a paper plate... to see how it might feel, lol. To me, if felt weird and awkward to hold it right-handed, with the neck pointing left. It felt much more natural and comfortable to hold it left-handed. I really don't want to have to fight against that natural-feeling when getting started.

But as so many people have said, there's a much bigger range of banjos available is you play right-handed and maybe I'll get used to it. Other than buying a right-handed banjo and seeing how it goes, I don't see how I can know.

Anyway, thank you all again for the replies and input.

Rich


Only you can know just how left-handed you are.  If, like me, you are at the extreme end of the spectrum, then do yourself a favour and insist on a left-handed instrument.  You will hear from lots of people who will tell you that if you've never played a fretted instrument before, it's "just as easy" to learn to play right-handed, or "both hands have to do something," or, like Joel said "you play a right handed piano, don't you?"  Don't listen to any of it: it's all bunk.

Stringed instruments (excluding the piano) are made the way they are in order to favour right-handed people, so that the dominant hand plays rhythm and the subdominant plays melody.  This is because rhythm is much more important than melody.  If any of the above were correct, you would see many right-handed people playing left-handed instruments, which never happens unless there's some physical disability which forces the lefty on them.  If your dominant hand is your left, then it should be picking, and your right hand should be fretting.

The piano is a special case.  The bass notes are on the left because that's the way we read the alphabet -- left to right.  The lowest piano key is an A, and the rest follow up from there.  There's no particular musical reason why this happened, but it did, and it presents an advantage to a lefty pianist because so much piano music has the rhythm in the bass.


The lowest note on the banjo is C on the far left, the rest follow up from there. Seems to be the same thing to me.

Oct 26, 2021 - 6:35:11 AM

25 posts since 12/8/2011

If you see a second hand Grafton Clipper (or certain other models, but the Clipper was most-made) I might jump on it. Graftons were UK based, same general idea as Gold tone (ie Good parts from Chinese factories, assembled and set up domestic). I like mine a lot.

They served a small market so there won't be very many lefty models floating around, but I have seen some on eBay before. Archive of their old website is here.

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