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Oct 23, 2021 - 8:09:32 AM
745 posts since 5/22/2021

Hi everyone!

Well, recently, I have really been trying to learn this part of Pete Seeger's "end-tune" to Old-Joe-Clark, but I have been having a extremely hard time hearing it out. I was able to decipher the first ~5 seconds of it (which is a lot of hammer-ons and pull offs on the 3rd string second fret, and the 4th string second fret), but then have no idea to play the rest, like he does, in frailing.

Here is a recording from Prague, 1964, of him playing this: youtu.be/jyMFrVaPOS8?t=808. The section ends at youtu.be/jyMFrVaPOS8?t=852.

Embedded video:


That is when he starts his "end-tune" (as I call it), to wrap up old-joe-clark. I know, for sure, that he is using his thumb and middle finger at one point to play very loud and fast, as shown here at a short excerpt of a Australian performance of the same "end-tune":



So, does anyone here know if they can help out with deciphering this amazing tune? I really wanted to learn it, but I have been having a major block on it for a while now.

Thank you everyone! Any advice or feedback is very appreciated!

-Russ A.

Edited by - BeeEnvironment on 10/26/2021 07:03:12

Oct 23, 2021 - 8:29:41 AM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

I noticed that he plays this song in a lot of old recordings from the 50s and 60s.

Oct 23, 2021 - 11:21:40 AM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

I would think this is also called Leather Britches, but I am not sure.

Oct 23, 2021 - 3:58:39 PM
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dbrooks

USA

4141 posts since 3/11/2004

This video and tab by Josh Turknett  may be helpful.

Clawhammer Tune (and Tab) of the Week: "Leather Britches" - YouTube

David

Oct 23, 2021 - 5:03:15 PM
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rcc56

USA

3841 posts since 2/20/2016

One of the techniques you are referring to is striking two strings simultaneously on the "boom" stroke of the boom-ditty.

Pete Seeger placed absolutely no limitations on the banjo.  He was a true pioneer.  He was playing Bach before Bela Fleck was born. Everybody learned from his book, and his record "The Goofing-Off Suite." A performer of all styles of music, and music from many cultures, he was an elderly man when the term "world music" was coined. I can't think of anyone else who could mesmerize an audience the way he did on a solo show with just a banjo and his voice, except perhaps for John Hartford.

They blacklisted him, but they couldn't stop him. They couldn't even slow him down.

Get his book if you don't already have it.

When I was 8 or 9 years old, my father showed me 3 chords on the guitar.  Then he handed me Pete's instructional record, "The Folksinger's Guitar Guide, and said "There's 2 years [or was it 4?] worth of lessons on this record.  You're on your own."  So when I got a banjo when I was 18, I got Pete's banjo book, and went on from there.  But 47 years later, I'm afraid I still can't do anywhere near as much with a banjo as Pete could.  But the banjo was in and out of my life many times, and I never put in the hours on the banjo that Pete did.  I did pay off my house with a guitar and a bass fiddle, though.

Explore and experiment.  Listen to everything, then try and find a way to make it work on the banjo.  That's what Pete did.

Edited by - rcc56 on 10/23/2021 17:19:31

Oct 23, 2021 - 5:32:13 PM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

One of the techniques you are referring to is striking two strings simultaneously on the "boom" stroke of the boom-ditty.

Pete Seeger placed absolutely no limitations on the banjo.  He was a true pioneer.  He was playing Bach before Bela Fleck was born. Everybody learned from his book, and his record "The Goofing-Off Suite." A performer of all styles of music, and music from many cultures, he was an elderly man when the term "world music" was coined. I can't think of anyone else who could mesmerize an audience the way he did on a solo show with just a banjo and his voice, except perhaps for John Hartford.

They blacklisted him, but they couldn't stop him. They couldn't even slow him down.

Get his book if you don't already have it.

When I was 8 or 9 years old, my father showed me 3 chords on the guitar.  Then he handed me Pete's instructional record, "The Folksinger's Guitar Guide, and said "There's 2 years [or was it 4?] worth of lessons on this record.  You're on your own."  So when I got a banjo when I was 18, I got Pete's banjo book, and went on from there.  But 47 years later, I'm afraid I still can't do anywhere near as much with a banjo as Pete could.  But the banjo was in and out of my life many times, and I never put in the hours on the banjo that Pete did.  I did pay off my house with a guitar and a bass fiddle, though.

Explore and experiment.  Listen to everything, then try and find a way to make it work on the banjo.  That's what Pete did.


Thank-you for your advice! I totally agree with everything you said about Pete! I do have his book on the banjo, and it really helped me out!

I really hope I can learn this version of Leather Britches! I have been trying all sorts of things, but maybe have not looked everywhere yet...

Thanks again for your advice!

-Russ A.

Oct 23, 2021 - 5:33:35 PM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by dbrooks

This video and tab by Josh Turknett  may be helpful.

Clawhammer Tune (and Tab) of the Week: "Leather Britches" - YouTube

David


Thanks, David! It seems like a helpful video. I really was looking online for this particular version by Pete Seeger, but I guess I will have to try to imagine and create my own through the "folk process"!

Thanks again,

Russ A.

Oct 26, 2021 - 7:04:19 AM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

Hey everyone,

Just found out another part of the tune, but still am very lost. I just love his version of this though!

-Russ A.

Oct 26, 2021 - 10:00:28 AM
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Players Union Member

janolov

Sweden

41252 posts since 3/7/2006

I don't think it sounds like Leather Britches  as Josh Turknett plays it. It reminds more of another older version from W.A. Hinton recorded about 1931 ( I think): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHZjmECGp_E&

I think I have a tab somewhere in my one of my computers. I will look for it and come back (I think my tab is based on a tab in John Burkes old book). 

Oct 26, 2021 - 10:09:25 AM

745 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by janolov

I don't think it sounds like Leather Britches  as Josh Turknett plays it. It reminds more of another older version from W.A. Hinton recorded about 1931 ( I think): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHZjmECGp_E&

I think I have a tab somewhere in my one of my computers. I will look for it and come back (I think my tab is based on a tab in John Burkes old book). 


Janolov,

Thanks very much for the reply! That youtube video you linked really sounds similar! Perhaps Seeger learned from that recording, which would make sense! 

Please let me know if you happen to find a similar tab! I appreciate it,

Thanks again,

Russ A.

Oct 27, 2021 - 11:28:50 AM
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Players Union Member

janolov

Sweden

41252 posts since 3/7/2006

This is a try to catch W.A. Hinton's playing, not Pete Seeger's, but it may be helpful. I think Pete avoided drop thumb, which I have included in this version. Pete also plays a lot faster than Hinton.


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