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Oct 21, 2021 - 11:06:19 AM
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Brian T

Canada

18846 posts since 6/5/2008

Nailed it to the year and the season, no less. Vikings were Norse travelers to Vinland.
Centuries later, Columbus and others must have learned of their travels.

smithsonianmag.com/science-nat...80978903/

Oct 21, 2021 - 12:31:48 PM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11691 posts since 2/22/2007

That's some cool info, Brian.

Oct 21, 2021 - 12:33:01 PM

dat

USA

31556 posts since 7/26/2006

Ifin i wuz to guess, i would say they weren’t the first to walk there either, and how much farther did they go than just there.

Kinda like arsenio hall, things that make you say hmmmmm

Oct 21, 2021 - 12:47:20 PM

donc

Canada

6780 posts since 2/9/2010

After visiting Newfoundland I was convinced that many ancient mariners were probably blown into the coast and were lucky if they survived the collision. The Atlantic ocean there is like being inside a massive washing machine . Surviving there long enough to leave artifacts indicates a high skill level.

Oct 21, 2021 - 1:00:16 PM

Brian T

Canada

18846 posts since 6/5/2008

The Viking colony on Greenland is estimated to have been 500 or more people.
Their existance there was no accident. Norse saga poetry records those events.
As for Newfoundland occupation, The Vikings were there and successful to be running bog-iron metal smelters for weapons and tools. Modern day satellite photography turns out to be a very good way to pinpoint potential settlement sites.

Using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a marker, all First Nations peoples of the Americas
are the descendants of 4 women: simply labelled as a, b, c and d. Somehow, those four and their offspring were the most successful all over the Americas. However, if you do the analysis on the east coast, there are the four AND 'e', who happened to be a Scandinavian woman.

Really tough, resilient people.

Oct 21, 2021 - 1:15:35 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

60400 posts since 10/5/2013

I think they coined the phrase “In Cod We Trust”

Oct 21, 2021 - 1:24:24 PM
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dat

USA

31556 posts since 7/26/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

The Viking colony on Greenland is estimated to have been 500 or more people.
Their existance there was no accident. Norse saga poetry records those events.
As for Newfoundland occupation, The Vikings were there and successful to be running bog-iron metal smelters for weapons and tools. Modern day satellite photography turns out to be a very good way to pinpoint potential settlement sites.

Using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a marker, all First Nations peoples of the Americas
are the descendants of 4 women: simply labelled as a, b, c and d. Somehow, those four and their offspring were the most successful all over the Americas. However, if you do the analysis on the east coast, there are the four AND 'e', who happened to be a Scandinavian woman.

Really tough, resilient people.


Whew, the whole continent, 4 may be 5 women,  proof there was no TV back then.

and who said I didn't believe in science 

Oct 21, 2021 - 4:34:06 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15481 posts since 9/27/2007

I have a long time Newfie friend that was born in the Codroy Valley. They have been searching for Viking evidence there for a while.

He has blue eyes & had blond hair. He wore leather vests, cowboy boots & big buckles. I used to fish a lot with him & his dad (also blue eyes) . His mother looked like an Eskimo to me & boy could she handle our fish!

He called me up years back & said " Guess what? Cowboy Bill is an Indian!" He got his full status Mic Mac card!

Turns out his mother was a descendant of the Beothuk & knew people that still lived on the land & would come in to trade. His dad is Mic Mac, I think there's some European heritage in there too!

https://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/aboriginal/beothuk.php 

Oct 21, 2021 - 6:36:36 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15481 posts since 9/27/2007

Oct 22, 2021 - 5:37:08 AM

7022 posts since 9/5/2006

if you had watched the vikings tv series you would have known this,,,, other then the american indian ,,, they were the first to explore the NEW world as they say. but i don't think chris had any idea about the vikings discovery.

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 10/22/2021 05:41:39

Oct 22, 2021 - 7:08:33 AM
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chuckv97

Canada

60400 posts since 10/5/2013

According to John Stewart Collis' book “Columbus” he figures it was common knowledge around Europe that the Vikings has traversed the Atlantic and discovered a new land a few centuries earlier. 


 

Edited by - chuckv97 on 10/22/2021 07:11:25

Oct 22, 2021 - 8:36:07 AM
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2426 posts since 7/20/2004

Legend has it the St. Brendan, an Irish monk, may have travelled as far west as Iceland, maybe even to North America, even before the Vikings.

Oct 22, 2021 - 9:35:07 AM
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DC5

USA

21177 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11

if you had watched the vikings tv series you would have known this,,,, other then the american indian ,,, they were the first to explore the NEW world as they say. but i don't think chris had any idea about the vikings discovery.

 


Well that settles it, if it was on TV it has to be true.

Oct 22, 2021 - 11:24:43 AM
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dat

USA

31556 posts since 7/26/2006

Yeah, ‘specially ifin it wuz on the view

Oct 22, 2021 - 2:29:52 PM
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Tommy5

USA

3942 posts since 2/22/2009

Regardless of the Viking adventures, it was the Columbus trip to the new World that lead to the European colonization of the Americas. Even if Chris had learned of a Viking trip, he didn’t use that info to secure financing for his trip, his voyage was a thousand miles further south from the Viking trips so he wouldn’t expect to land on the same land. He tried to reach Asia by sailing west, he was looking for a new trade route to the East Indies which were full of the spices the Europeans craved .

Oct 22, 2021 - 2:55:32 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18846 posts since 6/5/2008

Thanks to Marco Polo in the 13th century who came back to Europe after 25 years of bumming around Asia. He explained what the other end of the Silk Road looked like for cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and black pepper.
I suggest reading Nathaniel's Nutmeg to chronicle the psychopathic crews.  Interesting forms of ship-board entertainment.

Oct 22, 2021 - 6:39:26 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15481 posts since 9/27/2007

I have been here. https://www.thestar.com/life/travel/2020/11/28/two-unusual-sites-to-explore-in-the-peterborough-area.html 

There's an expert that says the Vikings came up the St. Lawrence & the Natives took them there & they added some of their own art.  The U of Calgary studied it. 

Oct 22, 2021 - 6:52:53 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15481 posts since 9/27/2007

http://nephicode.blogspot.com/2018/01/did-ancient-norsemen-sail-st-lawrence_5.html

This shows some of the carvings that look like Viking ships.

Oct 23, 2021 - 8:22:41 AM

7022 posts since 9/5/2006

but i don't think chris had the viking sunstone to navigate with,,,or didn't know how it worked.

Oct 23, 2021 - 8:57:16 AM

2863 posts since 2/10/2013

Browse "Carthage's Lost Warriors". They may have fled the Romans and sailed to South America 1500 years before Columbus. Migrations and travels aren't always included in western historical records.

Didn't the Aztecs expect pale skinned people to eventually return ? This Aztec attitude contributed to the Spanish domination of the Aztec.

Oct 23, 2021 - 10:28:04 AM
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Brian T

Canada

18846 posts since 6/5/2008

I've seen pictures of the Viking sunstones. Apparently, you can find the sun on an overcast day.
The explanations nevermake any sense to me. But, the stones work well.
I wonder who figured that out and when? Has to be ancient history.

Given the pattern of global atmospheric circulation, sailing with the Westerlies and the Trade winds is a straight-forward method to get to the Americas from Europe and back again.

Europeans were the last of several to visit and trade with the Pacific Northwest First Nations here on the west coast. The Russians and the Chinese were here for probably a century or more.

Tlingit in Alaska are still growing potatoes which are genetic clones of a variety growing in Peru.
( I know a guy in Wasilla who is a very successful grape grower.)
The Haida and also Tsimshian have huge hidden forest gardens which are accessible only by boat.
Nobody was starving. Twice a day, the tide goes out to expose all the beaches modified for clam and oyster production.

Oct 23, 2021 - 10:28:15 AM

251 posts since 8/25/2009

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11

but i don't think chris had the viking sunstone to navigate with,,,or didn't know how it worked.


European sailors had the magnetic compass a couple of centuries before 1492,so they didn't need a sunstone to tell directions.

Oct 23, 2021 - 10:56:11 AM
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2050 posts since 2/4/2013

I think it's fair to say that Palaeolithic hunter gatherers discovered America.

Oct 23, 2021 - 11:27:33 AM
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Brian T

Canada

18846 posts since 6/5/2008

It was the European intention to subjugate and eradicate the indigenous First Nations peoples that they found, all over the Americas which is an enormous piece of land.

Paleo people populated Beringia for maybe 10,000 years. Although, they were entirely free to explore the west coast. With sea levels likely 100m below what they are now, any evidence of that occupation will be very difficult to find. Out and down to 70', yes (Haida Gwaii stone fishing weirs).

Maybe an invasion some 20,000 - 30,000 years ago but what really can you be looking for?
The oldest know Heiltsuk settlement (carbon dated) is 14,500 years BP, Just as their oral historians recount can precisely describe the location.

If "first" matters, then Columbus was "last."

Oct 23, 2021 - 2:00:02 PM
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DC5

USA

21177 posts since 6/30/2015

Actually, wasn't Vespucci last? After all, the continents are named were named after him, not Columbus, or Leif Ericson.

God Bless Vespucciland

Oct 24, 2021 - 1:26:35 AM
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Paul R

Canada

15143 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Tommy5

Regardless of the Viking adventures, it was the Columbus trip to the new World that lead to the European colonization of the Americas. Even if Chris had learned of a Viking trip, he didn’t use that info to secure financing for his trip, his voyage was a thousand miles further south from the Viking trips so he wouldn’t expect to land on the same land. He tried to reach Asia by sailing west, he was looking for a new trade route to the East Indies which were full of the spices the Europeans craved .


Probably because he didn't like the cold.

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