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Oct 20, 2021 - 4:59:02 PM
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mander

USA

4733 posts since 10/7/2007

I asked the HR lady how it was going. She just hired her 85th employee since beginning her job in May. There are 237 people on non management staff. That is a huge turn over in a very short time. Some of the folks quit before they even get through orientation. It isn't that awful a job. I've clung to jobs that were way worse than this place. The "We are Hiring" sign has been up the entire time I've been at the job and it was there long before I got there. I keep scratching my head as to why so many people quit.

For me, the who I work with is a big decider in job satisfaction. I currently work with the best crew I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I keep an eye on the want ads, and I see lots of openings at better paying jobs, but I stay put because I doubt I will ever find another crew like the one I have now. It is really nice to work with kind people. I go home for lunch and when I get back, five people will ask, "How was your lunch?" That is a little tiny thing, I know, but small niceties were missing from my life for a long time and I value them greatly. I accept minimum wage because my co-workers are polite to me. So long as they stay put, I will, too.

What factors in job satisfaction for you?

Oct 20, 2021 - 5:13:37 PM
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4021 posts since 4/22/2018
Online Now

It’s money for me. Knowing I have xx going in the bank every month and security that it will continue do do so keeps me happy in my work. I do enjoy some interaction with my colleagues, nut I honestly couldn’t give a monkeys if they were either genuinely or ingenuinely interested in what I had for lunch - I’m in it for the cash.

Oct 20, 2021 - 5:16:18 PM

Owen

Canada

9820 posts since 6/5/2011

... onto a bit of a tangent I suppose, but at a staff meeting at one of the fly-in schools the principal informed us that he'd soon be away on a recruiting junket to Winnipeg.  One of the single, but probably past-his-prime guys piped up and put in a request [I forget his precise words] that it would be appreciated if the principal could hire some "not old" females that were easier on the eyes.

Edit: So far as I know, nobody seemed much concerned or displeased and generally seemed get a bit of a chuckle out of it.    ... not sure it would pass muster in all situations.

Edited by - Owen on 10/20/2021 17:34:13

Oct 20, 2021 - 5:22:30 PM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

25405 posts since 6/25/2005

I always felt that no job or pay grade is worth an ulcer. I left a couple that were headed that way—one a federal job with a long-term career and real chance for advancement. For me, control over how I did my job was important. I taught high school for 23 years, with minimum intrusion from supervisors, and psychological rewards from student successes. I wouldn’t choose that work today—too much outside control any more.

Oct 20, 2021 - 5:34:44 PM

mander

USA

4733 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

... onto a bit of a tangent I suppose, but at a staff meeting at one of the fly-in schools the principal informed us that he'd soon be away on a recruiting junket to Winnipeg.  One of the single, but probably past-his-prime guys piped up and put in a request [I forget his precise words] that it would be appreciated if the principal could hire some "not old" females that were easier on the eyes.


Someone once asked me what it was like to work for my principal, a women in her early forties. I said, "I don't know, I've never really spoken with her. I will say, she hires good looking men." It was an elementary school with a more men to women ratio, fairly unheard of at the time.

Oct 20, 2021 - 6:44:20 PM
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493 posts since 10/18/2020

I worked for a school district from 1985 -2008 i was one of the supervisors for the grounds department second in charge we had a great bunch of guys up until the last three years of working there, then the powers that be decided they would cut our crew by two thirds they cut us from 27 people including myself down to 9 including myself, prior to the cuts we would all get together once per month and put a party together we would barbecue carnie asada and have a feast just to relax at the end of each month, once the cuts were made to our crew it was never the same, the powers that be had it in their heads that we could maintain the school sites the same with two thirds less crew members it could not be done they treated us like slave labor, so the last third of us ended up leaving after three years of being treated like slaves for twenty years we took pride in our work and the way our schools looked they killed our moral and everything else that was good, i drove by a couple of the schools we maintained recently and it was a disgusting mess trees untrimmed,bushes untrimmed and grass uncut, being happy in your job is huge in my opinion and the people you work with matters greatly, in my opinion i gave up a job i had been at for 23 years simply because i became vary unhappy with my surroundings it didnt matter how good the money was which i made vary good money it did not matter anylonger.

Oct 20, 2021 - 7:00:20 PM

Owen

Canada

9820 posts since 6/5/2011

.... after a bit of reflection, I suppose the prime consideration is that my superiors not be [expletive redacted].

Edited by - Bill Rogers on 10/20/2021 21:29:41

Oct 20, 2021 - 10:36:08 PM
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Paul R

Canada

15156 posts since 1/28/2010

I started in print advertising out of university in Montreal. Worst job I ever had. I lasted two years and quit. I had two weeks vacation coming and took it as my two weeks notice. When I asked the Treasurer why something was done a certain way, he replied, "Because that's the way it's done!" It was a dead end job and I took the opportunity to crash with friends in Toronto. There I did substitute teaching, which led me to chose teaching as a career. Best decision, period. I never did it for the money. In fact, I didn't even think about the pay or the pension, which is okay - quite good by my standards. I've had times of no income; this was much better.

I had the freedom, within limits, to manage my own domain, the classroom. As I often said, when I started it was also the most fun you could have and still be legal. Fulfill your responsibilities, do your job well, and add as many creative touches that you can. Running intramural leagues, coaching teams, directing choirs, bringing performers into the school, doing film animation, planning field trips, running a cycling club - there were lots of ways to add creativity to the "job". Later on, administrivia, entitlement, and helicopter parents spoiled some of it. I didn't mind the hours - even in my last year I was coming in at 7:30 in the morning and leaving at 6:00 at night and bringing work home.

Staff interactions were not without the occasional friction, but the "friction" often left the school and the career. The school I was at the longest was blessed with a super active staff. You had to see the Thanksgiving dinner (lunch, actually) to appreciate how everyone pitched in together.

I was lucky to work for some great principals, too. That makes a difference. I recall asking a teacher about her school. She remarked, "There's something about being against a principal that unites a staff!"

As for attractive members of the opposite sex: When I was in teachers' college, I was sitting in the cafeteria with three fellow students, young women who were all married. A guy walked in and they started remarking, "Look at him!" "What a hunk!" "I wouldn't kick him out of bed for eating crackers!" I was somewhat dumbfounded by the outbursts and said, "But you're all married," to which one answered, "Just 'cause you're on a diet doesn't mean you can't look at the menu!"

Oct 21, 2021 - 2:45:44 PM
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donc

Canada

6782 posts since 2/9/2010

I'm in some agreement with Mander. The people I worked with were the most important thing in any given day. Going to work just for a pay check can be a poor excuse if that is your only compensation . Work usually occupies about 30% of a person's life. Once those hours are gone we don't get them back. Positive human interaction and work satisfaction are much greater rewards. The money doesn't always last but your positive life experiences are your's to keep. Money can always be taken away from you but your own enjoyable experiences are your's to keep. Work hard and play hard seems to work well for some people but it never really resonated in my world. On the other hand I wouldn't stay at a $5 job if I was capable of earning $35. In most cases our skill level doesn't usually offer a vast range of wage levels within the same community.

Oct 21, 2021 - 3:08:25 PM
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dat

USA

31575 posts since 7/26/2006

Job satisfaction for me now is that nobody messes with me, i get my job done, the COO doesn’t mess with me, the owner doesn’t mess with me, they say what our goal is then i never hear from them again until we reach that and a new one is in place, no questions on when, why or how much on anything, when we do talk it isn’t really about work, we talk about family, hunting, what ever else comes up, they know i’m doing what needs to be done.

After years of customer service, i needed a break from the pub lick

Oh, almost forgot, i get a paycheck too

Oct 21, 2021 - 3:13:29 PM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11700 posts since 2/22/2007

I don't have to love it but I do have to not hate it, and if I'm surrounded by negative people radiating negativity, then I will hate it. That garbage is contagious. I do have to feel good about myself and what I'm doing to earn a living. And that can be, and sometimes has been, a very humble job, but if it provides a useful service to someone and I'm not harming anyone or cheating anyone then I can drag myself up and get out there and do what it takes to provide for me and mine, and feel OK about it.

Oct 21, 2021 - 3:31:47 PM

Owen

Canada

9820 posts since 6/5/2011

On one of the fly-in reserves I was 1/2 of a 2 person spec. ed. dept.  At some point the teacher that was the other half transferred to a classroom teacher.  One day, a bit after that, the principal asked me, "How are things going?" I replied something like,"All right, but It's a good thing _______ switched to a classroom.... otherwise I'd probably be up on a murder charge."   He smiled/nodded knowingly and replied, "You too."

Oct 21, 2021 - 5:26:07 PM
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m06

England

10512 posts since 10/5/2006

The jobs I find most satisfying are those where my time and effort make a direct and tangible positive difference in regard to something people care about.

Running my own business and having the freedom to shape my working day, create variety and the pure joy of not being subject to the sort of management guff that often exists in large companies is also a source of job satisfaction.

Money is a motivation but as long as it is sufficient has relatively little to do with actual job satisfaction.

Edited by - m06 on 10/21/2021 17:38:52

Oct 21, 2021 - 6:23:20 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18866 posts since 6/5/2008

There was a stretch where I had a micro-managing bully administrator in my face nearly every day.
One day, I lost it. Sorry but I did.
I was in his face to spit on his glasses and scared the bejezus out of him.
Said I'd rip out his gizzard (humans don't have one.)
He never ever spoke to me again or sent a memo in the rest of his days.

Yeah, I had job satisfaction.

Oct 22, 2021 - 3:06 AM

1394 posts since 9/6/2019

In my job we usually have two types of people. Older guys who are either ex-military or retired military, and very young guys who have only been out of college for a couple of years. Our work environment is pretty good but I have noticed that there is a distinct attitude difference between the young guys and the older ones. The younger ones tend to jump jobs every couple of years. Most that leave aren't unhappy, they just want something different. The older guys tend to stay as long as they can. We don't have a high turnover because our company benefits are at the top of the scale in our business area and, like I said, the atmosphere and job security are both pretty good. We just doubled the size of our office over the past couple of years so I guess we may start seeing a few people move on, but the majority seem like they are going to stay for a while. It's also very satisfying to know that what you do saves lives. I've been in this field for 30 years, so I guess I do get some satisfaction out of it. wink

Oct 22, 2021 - 5:53:21 AM
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75136 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by mander

I asked the HR lady how it was going. She just hired her 85th employee since beginning her job in May. There are 237 people on non management staff. That is a huge turn over in a very short time. Some of the folks quit before they even get through orientation. It isn't that awful a job. I've clung to jobs that were way worse than this place. The "We are Hiring" sign has been up the entire time I've been at the job and it was there long before I got there. I keep scratching my head as to why so many people quit.

For me, the who I work with is a big decider in job satisfaction. I currently work with the best crew I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I keep an eye on the want ads, and I see lots of openings at better paying jobs, but I stay put because I doubt I will ever find another crew like the one I have now. It is really nice to work with kind people. I go home for lunch and when I get back, five people will ask, "How was your lunch?" That is a little tiny thing, I know, but small niceties were missing from my life for a long time and I value them greatly. I accept minimum wage because my co-workers are polite to me. So long as they stay put, I will, too.

What factors in job satisfaction for you?


I wanted a job that let me take off and go play music when I felt like it.

Lobstering made that possible.

Oct 22, 2021 - 5:33:07 PM

mander

USA

4733 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis
quote:
Originally posted by mander

I asked the HR lady how it was going. She just hired her 85th employee since beginning her job in May. There are 237 people on non management staff. That is a huge turn over in a very short time. Some of the folks quit before they even get through orientation. It isn't that awful a job. I've clung to jobs that were way worse than this place. The "We are Hiring" sign has been up the entire time I've been at the job and it was there long before I got there. I keep scratching my head as to why so many people quit.

For me, the who I work with is a big decider in job satisfaction. I currently work with the best crew I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I keep an eye on the want ads, and I see lots of openings at better paying jobs, but I stay put because I doubt I will ever find another crew like the one I have now. It is really nice to work with kind people. I go home for lunch and when I get back, five people will ask, "How was your lunch?" That is a little tiny thing, I know, but small niceties were missing from my life for a long time and I value them greatly. I accept minimum wage because my co-workers are polite to me. So long as they stay put, I will, too.

What factors in job satisfaction for you?


I wanted a job that let me take off and go play music when I felt like it.

Lobstering made that possible.


I find that very amusing. My mother worked as a branch chief for the federal government during a hiring crisis. They knew she wouldn't fire them because she couldn't replace them. Guys would call in and say, "Can't make it today, the fishing is too good." Had she only know, they would have shown up if she let them bring their banjos!

Oct 22, 2021 - 9:17:55 PM

12704 posts since 1/15/2005

I worked for the gentleman that mentored me for 10 years ..... all very pleasant. I did not make a lot of money, but I knew I was being trained so that one day I would have the opportunity to do well if I would just be patient. One day I asked for a new way to structure my salary based on how much business/money that we brought in. You would have thought that I asked for half of the business, but my boss told me that he didn't start making any real money until he was 40 years old and I guess he thought that I shouldn't either. I think I was about 35 at the time. It turned out he was about right, as I was 40 before I really had a decent income. When I worked for him, it was just him, me (who did all of the work), and our secretary. After he retired and closed the office in 1981, I started working for myself and have ever since. It is great working for yourself doing something you love!

Oct 22, 2021 - 10:43:13 PM

Ron C

USA

1485 posts since 3/17/2004

m06 made a very poignant statement that I agree with: " The jobs I find most satisfying are those where my time and effort make a direct and tangible positive difference in regard to something people care about."

I spent 31 years at my last job before retiring. It was on the engineering faculty of a university. I loved it! There were tangible results based on feedback from my undergraduate and graduate students. I still get emails and calls from students that were in my classes or my research lab decades ago, offering thanks or requesting advice. On occasion, I go out to dinner with former students and we catch up or discuss the student's life decisions.

Oh, like any organization, there are dreadfully boring meetings to attend, impotent committees to belong to, administrators too full of their own power, envious colleagues if you win a teaching or research award, and assorted other distasteful individuals. But there are enough civil, gracious, kind, and cooperative people to make it all worthwhile.

Ron

Oct 22, 2021 - 11:50:07 PM
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Tommy5

USA

3947 posts since 2/22/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

I always felt that no job or pay grade is worth an ulcer. I left a couple that were headed that way—one a federal job with a long-term career and real chance for advancement. For me, control over how I did my job was important. I taught high school for 23 years, with minimum intrusion from supervisors, and psychological rewards from student successes. I wouldn’t choose that work today—too much outside control any more.


Exactly. When I started up in special Ed.  over thirty five years ago, everything was new, I not only taught science, I wrote the science curriculum for the school district. The first few years we didn't even have to write lesson plans , so we could play everything by ear. Eventually the principal said we needed a lesson plan in  case we were absent so I wrote a  one  day generic lesson plan ,of course I was never absent so it didn't really matter. Paper work was kept to a minimum since the principal didn't want people wasting time writing stuff , he  said  , if you weren't working with students you weren't really working. Of course time changes everything ,paper work exploded with event of computers., We had to physically restrain students as I worked with emotionally disturbed students, the restraint form started out as  an half page thing , when I retired the form was four full pages long and took an hour to fill out., IEPs  became novels, the new principal , a social worker that knew nothing about science was going over my daily lessons  plans and writing nasty notes in the margins. Retirement came just in time.

Edited by - Tommy5 on 10/22/2021 23:55:12

Oct 23, 2021 - 5:53:02 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

Teaching was either the best job I ever hated, or the worst job I ever loved. Could never really decide. But having taught in 3 schools with 4 principals, and several assistant principals, I can say that the principal can make a huge difference in both moral and job satisfaction. My own basic job satisfaction rule is tell me what you want done, and when, then give me the tools and stay out of my way and let me do it. Only one principal met that criteria, but one assistant principal (who later went on to become superintendent) went above and beyond that to help me succeed. Most just blamed the teachers for the schools failures.

In high tech I found that money wasn't everything, because in some jobs I was paid crazy money, but the stress factor made it not worth it. The satisfaction of every raise disappeared after the 3rd paycheck.

The money's not great, but retirement is probably the best job I've ever had. I keep thinking about getting something to supplement my income, but they'd want me to show up at a specific time and stay for a specific period. There's lots of interesting offers from places looking to fill job slots. And many are tempting, but when I think about what I'd have to give up I get over the temptation quickly.

Oct 23, 2021 - 6:46:56 AM

75136 posts since 5/9/2007

I worked for Gramp when he needed help.Other than that I had no boss to answer to.I always liked that and still do.

Oct 23, 2021 - 7:15:53 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

I used to be self employed, but the guy I worked for was a jerk.

Oct 23, 2021 - 8:02:08 AM

10 posts since 12/31/2004

I've been working in Higher Ed for the past 32 years, the last 27 with the same employer. Horrible pay but great benefits. This allowed my wife to pursue many different career paths leading to her making 3x the pay I'll ever see, although I just got a big promotion and raise. There are days I love my job and days I absolutely hate it, but it has always been very challenging in a good way. Can't wait for retirement, though!

Oct 24, 2021 - 2:08:07 AM

Paul R

Canada

15156 posts since 1/28/2010

They said only 55% of us would get jobs, but I was offered a job on October 29 of my year at teachers' college. But I got out of that school after one year. The principal, a short guy, did not like men, especially tall ones. A lot of us transferred out, and I lucked out with one, Steve, who showed confidence in me. So, when I proposed bringing folk singers into the school, he found the money. He knew I'd do extra things if he asked me. One reason I transferred out of that second school, two more principals later, was to work for Steve again. I had two principals I'd definitely never work for again, one that I'd tolerate, and three I'd gladly work for. I worked for two of them twice.

Paperwork became something else. I got so frustrated with administrivia that one spring I included a fake report in my student final reports. I still don't know how long it took for the vice principal to realize. But Sammy Drano's report caused a bit of a stir in the office. The last comment on the report was, "In Art, Sammy showed lots of creative talent in woodcarving. Caretakers assess the damage at $6,000." Maybe that's when he caught on.

I worked in schools that had great, active staffs. Problem teachers usually didn't last long.

Oct 24, 2021 - 5:55:49 AM

75136 posts since 5/9/2007

I don't think I would have done very well working for someone else.
As things turned out I have a nice piece of Maine woods and a home that's good enough to live in.
If I hadn't been side-lined with brain tumor problems and trade-offs I'd still have my wonderful Jarvis Newman 32 footer and 600 traps in the water.Oh well...life goes on with band practice in Camden this afternoon.We're looking into hiring a steel player.

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