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Oct 16, 2021 - 4:51:49 PM
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6189 posts since 8/19/2012

One of our nieces is an RN and says that you can't cure stupidity but you can sedate it.

After watching the 5 pm TV news tonight I am concerned that there is going to be a sedative shortage. It is probably stuck in a container anchored off of Port of Los Angeles.

Edited by - wizofos on 10/16/2021 16:52:46

Oct 16, 2021 - 4:59:51 PM
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889 posts since 10/4/2018

I believe the stupidity epidemic has gotten stronger and stronger as the years have gone by.

Oct 16, 2021 - 9:39:02 PM

Brian T

Canada

18866 posts since 6/5/2008

Your niece is brilliant. Fentanyl might have a productive value after all.

Oct 17, 2021 - 4:56:36 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26546 posts since 8/3/2003

You don't need a sedative to use the off button on your TV remote. And those on TV aren't going to think they need one. Get a good book and read it instead of listening to news that isn't news, but their thoughts and beliefs. Go for a walk, take a drive, do something besides listening to the talking heads.

Oct 17, 2021 - 7:19:31 AM

2868 posts since 2/10/2013

Make sure you are aware of the difference between ignorance and stupidity. You can't change the amount of intelligence you are born with. But possessing more information about a subject enables you to make better decisions. You cannot study how to make yourself more intelligent, but you can learn more about subjects and make better choices.

The late Robert MItchum said "Studying to be an actor is like studying how to be taller".

Be well informed. People will think you are more intelligent.

Oct 17, 2021 - 7:44:44 AM

752 posts since 5/22/2021

Just do what folks did 150 years ago, like talking, walking, eating, that stuff. Enjoying the outdoors was a thing then.

-Russ

Oct 17, 2021 - 8:13:50 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Good Buddy

I believe the stupidity epidemic has gotten stronger and stronger as the years have gone by.


There are vaccines available, but they refuse to take them.

Oct 17, 2021 - 8:24:48 AM

752 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Good Buddy

I believe the stupidity epidemic has gotten stronger and stronger as the years have gone by.


There are vaccines available, but they refuse to take them.


In that instance, then, as more people get the vax these past many years, the epidemic just grows stronger and stronger.....

Just my opinions and views here. Not trying to criticize or anything like that.

Oct 17, 2021 - 9:07:42 AM

Owen

Canada

9820 posts since 6/5/2011

I wonder whether there will be a shortage of crows in the foreseeable future........

 

.........or at the very least, as the opportunity to eat crow manifests itself, that they be classed as an endangered species.

Oct 17, 2021 - 9:24:44 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Good Buddy

I believe the stupidity epidemic has gotten stronger and stronger as the years have gone by.


There are vaccines available, but they refuse to take them.


In that instance, then, as more people get the vax these past many years, the epidemic just grows stronger and stronger.....

Just my opinions and views here. Not trying to criticize or anything like that.


I'm talking about the vaccine for stupidity.  There are vaccines, and cures, but too many people refuse them.

Oct 17, 2021 - 9:33:38 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

Just do what folks did 150 years ago, like talking, walking, eating, that stuff. Enjoying the outdoors was a thing then.

-Russ


Ah yes, the good old days that never were.  150 years ago there was child labor, post civil war slavery (disguised as prison labor), and squalid conditions in Tenement housing.  Let's all go back to that.

https://www.insider.com/what-the-world-looked-like-150-years-ago-2020-5#the-railroad-also-gave-people-access-to-different-types-of-food-15

https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2017/article/history-of-child-labor-in-the-united-states-part-1.htm

Edited by - DC5 on 10/17/2021 09:33:53

Oct 17, 2021 - 10:11:13 AM

752 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

Just do what folks did 150 years ago, like talking, walking, eating, that stuff. Enjoying the outdoors was a thing then.

-Russ


Ah yes, the good old days that never were.  150 years ago there was child labor, post civil war slavery (disguised as prison labor), and squalid conditions in Tenement housing.  Let's all go back to that.

https://www.insider.com/what-the-world-looked-like-150-years-ago-2020-5#the-railroad-also-gave-people-access-to-different-types-of-food-15

https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2017/article/history-of-child-labor-in-the-united-states-part-1.htm


Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure. Actually, I do remember meeting a kind old woman who would be 105 this year, and she owns a huge nice farm in SE PA. I don't know if she is still living, but I think so, because she was very healthy, knock-on-wood. Could see and hear quite fine when she was about 102. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 10:35:55 AM
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banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11700 posts since 2/22/2007

--"just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. --"

My Grandmother grew up and lived the bulk of her adult life in poverty, doing hard manual labor. Yet she always maintained that "the old times were better" and what she meant was that instead of everyone going their own way, there were extended families living together and neighbors were close and they shared a strong sense of community.
They grew their food together and ate together and grieved together. They made their own toys and their own games and did a lot of group singing, and she missed all of that in "modern times" where she said that "now everyone is on their own."

Edited by - banjo bill-e on 10/17/2021 10:36:45

Oct 17, 2021 - 11:54:18 AM

figmo59

USA

34454 posts since 3/5/2008

Time were much better when i was younger...

I didn't ..hurt..as much......

Did I know it then..?
Not really.....

But I do..now.. :0/

Oct 17, 2021 - 11:58:08 AM
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figmo59

USA

34454 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Good Buddy

I believe the stupidity epidemic has gotten stronger and stronger as the years have gone by.


Only time will tell..

As new..or..all the info comes out..

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:03:41 PM

kww

USA

1413 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
 

Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure.


If you can't be certain that slavery was bad, there is more wrong with you than I could ever have conceived of.

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:08:19 PM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

Just do what folks did 150 years ago, like talking, walking, eating, that stuff. Enjoying the outdoors was a thing then.

-Russ


Ah yes, the good old days that never were.  150 years ago there was child labor, post civil war slavery (disguised as prison labor), and squalid conditions in Tenement housing.  Let's all go back to that.

https://www.insider.com/what-the-world-looked-like-150-years-ago-2020-5#the-railroad-also-gave-people-access-to-different-types-of-food-15

https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2017/article/history-of-child-labor-in-the-united-states-part-1.htm


Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure. Actually, I do remember meeting a kind old woman who would be 105 this year, and she owns a huge nice farm in SE PA. I don't know if she is still living, but I think so, because she was very healthy, knock-on-wood. Could see and hear quite fine when she was about 102. 


Ah yes, but many of us who graduated High School >50 years ago had grandparents, great grandparents, aunts and uncles who told us about it.  I've actually met 3 former slaves and one Holocaust victim. My great aunt taught in a one room school house, she was born in the latter half of the 19th century, though I do not remember the exact date, but I do remember her stories.  I have a photograph of my father driving a team of horses pulling a hay wagon.  And I don't have to have lived in a time to read the history books or news articles to get an understanding of how things were.  Nothing was better 150 years ago than it is today. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:10:13 PM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by kww
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
 

Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure.


If you can't be certain that slavery was bad, there is more wrong with you than I could ever have conceived of.


Well, it did make a lot of white people very wealthy.  (note, I'm using the sarcasm font, but it may not show up on your browser)

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:13:55 PM

m06

England

10512 posts since 10/5/2006

I was chatting to a 94-year old neighbour on Friday. She described how her daughter took her in her wheelchair round one of these huge warehouse-style outlets. This lady had run her own small but busy local grocery store 60 years ago and she was appalled at the impersonal atmosphere and disinterest of check out staff ‘…not even a hello, how are you?’ she said.

In a few years that perspective will be lost altogether.

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:37:05 PM

10566 posts since 8/22/2006

At least we didn’t have to lock our doors nor worried about who our neighbors were. But that all changed when some pervert raped a neighbor child in a house that was under construction. That’s when our innocence was lost. Parents keep more scrutiny on us everybody started to be concerned about the well being of us children. Because of one sick individual.

Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 10/17/2021 12:37:49

Oct 17, 2021 - 2:36:36 PM
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kww

USA

1413 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
 

Ah yes, but many of us who graduated High School >50 years ago had grandparents, great grandparents, aunts and uncles who told us about it.


When I was young, I was a paperboy for the Omaha World Herald. One of my customers, Ed Guinan, had been a paperboy for the Omaha Bee.  One evening, he shared the story of having his paper sales interrupted by a crowd, followed by him hiding in terror overnight behind a garbage can in 1919 as a crowd rioted in downtown Omaha, hanging the mayor over the mayor's refusal to turn over a black man accused of raping a young white girl. The crowd ultimately did get their hands on him, and proudly posed next to his burnt corpse for photographs after they had dragged it through the streets.

He said he told me that story because he knew they would never teach it to me in Nebraska history, and he wanted to be certain that night would never be forgotten.

I repeat the story periodically to honour his wish. I haven't yet encountered anyone that learned it during history class, Nebraska history or otherwise.


 

Edited by - kww on 10/17/2021 14:45:06

Oct 17, 2021 - 4:44:30 PM

752 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by kww
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
 

Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure.


If you can't be certain that slavery was bad, there is more wrong with you than I could ever have conceived of.


Heck, slavery was very bad and evil. Not close to my point whatsoever. If you want to argue with years, 150 years ago was 1871, so after slavery nonetheless. A time when political corruption, environmental pollution, and deforestation was at a all time high. Not arguing that everything was good or bad. I would not think that it was either one or the other though.

Oct 18, 2021 - 5:40:24 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21274 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
quote:
Originally posted by kww
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment
 

Just for every bad thing, there was a positive side of things. None of us was living then, so we cannot tell for sure.


If you can't be certain that slavery was bad, there is more wrong with you than I could ever have conceived of.


Heck, slavery was very bad and evil. Not close to my point whatsoever. If you want to argue with years, 150 years ago was 1871, so after slavery nonetheless. A time when political corruption, environmental pollution, and deforestation was at a all time high. Not arguing that everything was good or bad. I would not think that it was either one or the other though.


Not was, is bad.  And slavery did not end after the civil war.  It continued under a different name.  Plantation owners could hire prisoners by paying the prison.  And who were the prisoners?  Mostly former slaves, many of whom ended up right back on the same plantation.  And slavery is still practiced in many parts of the world today.  Whatever your point is, you have it clouded in your rhetoric.  150 years ago might seem like a long time ago to you, but it is only a shade more than 2 of my lifetimes.  You are lucky that you did not have to live through Jim Crow, the civil rights marches, the Viet Nam marches.  The world you inherited is vastly different from the one I inherited.  When I was in High School 4 students were shot in Ohio by the National Guard for protesting the war.  That's right, the U.S. Military fired on it's own citizens for exercising their constitutional rights.  I remember seeing separate bathrooms and water fountains for blacks and whites on a family trip to Florida.  Go learn some actual history.  I suggest starting with Tulsa, then the Watts riots. 

Oct 18, 2021 - 7:19:15 AM

1394 posts since 9/6/2019

quote:
Originally posted by kww
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
 

Ah yes, but many of us who graduated High School >50 years ago had grandparents, great grandparents, aunts and uncles who told us about it.


When I was young, I was a paperboy for the Omaha World Herald. One of my customers, Ed Guinan, had been a paperboy for the Omaha Bee.  One evening, he shared the story of having his paper sales interrupted by a crowd, followed by him hiding in terror overnight behind a garbage can in 1919 as a crowd rioted in downtown Omaha, hanging the mayor over the mayor's refusal to turn over a black man accused of raping a young white girl. The crowd ultimately did get their hands on him, and proudly posed next to his burnt corpse for photographs after they had dragged it through the streets.

He said he told me that story because he knew they would never teach it to me in Nebraska history, and he wanted to be certain that night would never be forgotten.

I repeat the story periodically to honour his wish. I haven't yet encountered anyone that learned it during history class, Nebraska history or otherwise.


When I lived in Omaha in the early '90's they still had the "Kass Kounty King Korn" festival every year (note everything is spelled with a "K"). I dated a girl from Plattsmouth and, even though I'm white, there were a lot of places there I wouldn't walk in to.

Oct 18, 2021 - 10:10:50 AM

2868 posts since 2/10/2013

I hate "eating crow". So when I wanted to quit smoking, I loudly and widely announced that I was doing this. Avoiding "eating crow" was one of the major reasons for my success. That and exercise, and avoiding anything I associated with smoking.

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