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Oct 16, 2021 - 6:41:43 AM
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DC5

USA

21235 posts since 6/30/2015
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Not since I was a kid some 50-60 odd years ago have I run into a double yolked egg. They are virtually eliminated in the commercial egg business. Back when I was a kid there were 4 chicken farms within a short walk of my house, so we had fresh eggs most of the time. Now, residential chicken farms are becoming all the rage. Even many cities have some kind of rule that allows for raising "pet" chickens. Of course when most people get into this, they don't realize that a good laying hen can lay an egg a day, and if you have 10 chickens you could end up with 70 eggs a week, far more than a family of 4 could, or should consume. So I have become the beneficiary of two such farmers with small flocks of chickens and more eggs than they know what to do with, so I get them for free. The last dozen I received has had 4 (so far) double yolked eggs. I discovered the first one while baking for a recipe that required 2 egg yolks. I cracked open the first egg, separated the yolk and added it to the batter, but when I opened the second egg there were 2 yolks, and I ended up discarding the second one. My two egg breakfast last weekend ended up being one egg with 2 yolks. I know that the yolk is the least healthy part of the egg, but that is why it tastes so good. Every time I crack open a double yolker it brings back some memory from my childhood.

Oh yeah, and before any of you that do not raise chickens think about getting into it, chickens only lay eggs for about 5 years, but they can live 15-20. If you don't want to make them into soup, you will end up feeding non producing chickens for a long time after you get your last egg. Rule number one of farming - don't name your food. Also, don't think you can roast an old egg layer. About they only thing they are good for is soup. Roasting chickens are at most 6 months old.

Oct 16, 2021 - 6:46:53 AM
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15355 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by DC5

Also, don't think you can roast an old egg layer. About they only thing they are good for is soup. Roasting chickens are at most 6 months old.


Actually, an old layer - "fowl," to be technical - can be used for more than soup (though they're fabulous for that). Coq au Vin, for example - a classic French dish. Properly, they're made with stringy old roosters, not stringy old hens, but who has one of those strutting around? Long, slow braise in red wine with aromatic veggies, herbs and wine... they take quite a long time but the flavors and textures develop over that time to be quite lovely.

Oct 16, 2021 - 7:31:27 AM
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161 posts since 9/20/2009

I have taken to donating surplus eggs to the local food pantry. They have no qualms with variable colors or sizes and are consistently appreciative.

Oct 16, 2021 - 7:34:54 AM
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banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11698 posts since 2/22/2007

A perfect subject for banjo folks:

"Cluck old hen cluck and sing
Ain't seen an egg since way last Spring
Cluck old hen cluck and squall,
Ain't laid an egg since way last fall
Cluck old hen, cluck in the lot
Next time you cackle you'll cackle in the pot"

Oct 16, 2021 - 8:42:12 AM
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Brian T

Canada

18856 posts since 6/5/2008

12 weeks is the cost effective limit for raising meat birds in flocks of 300-350.
You reserve a date on the calendar for the butcher truck/semi to show up
to dress out all the birds, oven ready. Custom wine bottling is the same kind of a deal.

While I can buy store eggs with an unknown past history, I prefer to buy local farm eggs.
For all the eggs that I use, $5/dozen is OK. They are X-large. By weight, 5 of them is more
than 6 large store eggs. I did the same for store small eggs. They are no bargain whatsoever if you need 6 large in a recipe. Going on 10? years? I have not seen a double.
I don't think there's paprika in the farm feed to enhance the yolk color.

Oct 16, 2021 - 10:20:01 AM
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727 posts since 2/15/2015

I get Jumbos, and ever now an agin I get a double-yoker. Mama said they was good luck. Whenever I get a double yoker, I take a picture and send it to my sister.

And when I get a really big jumbo sometimes I'll weigh it in grams on my postal scale, and sometimes, if they're really big,  I ponder how much noise that hen made passing that egg!

Edited by - geoB on 10/16/2021 10:22:37

Oct 16, 2021 - 10:31:15 AM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15487 posts since 9/27/2007

I used to get a lot of double yolkers. I noticed I could pick them out before I cracked them because they were pointier on both ends.

Edited by - bubbalouie on 10/16/2021 10:31:55

Oct 16, 2021 - 11:02:57 AM
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3942 posts since 4/7/2009

If you let them rest over the winter they’ll lay for about ten years. That means using no artificial lighting.

We usually donate surplus eggs to neighbors or the food pantry.

Unfortunately a weasel wiped out our flock this year. Major safety upgrades coming next year.

Oct 16, 2021 - 11:58:58 AM
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889 posts since 10/4/2018

In the past 45 years or so of my egg breaking career, I haven't noticed any more or fewer instances of finding double eggs. They have always been kind of rare. But not more rare today than back then. Either way, I wouldn't throw away the yolks, as they bring you luck. Without the magical properties of luck, the world would stop turning, the sun would stop rising and chickens would stop laying double eggs altogether. Eat them, cherish them, and don't usher in the end of days by discarding them.

Edited by - Good Buddy on 10/16/2021 12:00:24

Oct 16, 2021 - 2:17:12 PM

227 posts since 10/26/2018

Young, first year chickens are more likely to lay a double yoker. Chicken feed can have marigolds in it that can influence the yolk color some, but the best way to get dark yolks is let the birds forage off the land, eating a variety of bugs and vegetation. And they will for sure lay eggs for 10 years because we had a couple that age that continued to lay one every other day until their demise (varmint). We also let them rest over the winter.

One laid an egg that had no shell, just the membrane surrounding an otherwise complete egg. It was weird. I made a video of it, I'll see if I can find that.

Edited by - WVDreamin on 10/16/2021 14:27:09

Oct 16, 2021 - 2:36:13 PM
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227 posts since 10/26/2018

Shell-less egg - Here

Oct 16, 2021 - 3:42:52 PM
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3942 posts since 4/7/2009

Yeah, we’ve had shell-less eggs on occasion. I’m always amazed they get laid without breaking.

Oct 16, 2021 - 4:01:26 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15487 posts since 9/27/2007

A friend gave me some fresh eggs from her farm. I had a roommate & we were in our early 20's.

We did not cook anything but grilled cheese or fried egg sandwiches. Our fridge was for beer & leftover pizza.

I was hungry one time & all I could find was a couple of eggs. I knew they were old but they smelled fine when I cracked them in a pan so I fried them up & ate them.  I ran into her not too long after & laughingly told her I just finished off the eggs she gave me.

She was shocked & said they might have been 8 months old! Turns out chickens put a natural coat of preservative on them. They last longer if they're not washed too aggressively. 

I guess they used to preserve them in crocks with isinglass made from sturgeon stomachs.  

https://www.museumsincornwall.org.uk/Preserving-eggs/Latest-News/Callington-Heritage-Centre/Museum-News/

Edited by - bubbalouie on 10/16/2021 16:03:22

Oct 16, 2021 - 4:29:59 PM
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figmo59

USA

34447 posts since 3/5/2008

....


 

Oct 16, 2021 - 4:38:40 PM
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Owen

Canada

9810 posts since 6/5/2011

George:  "I ponder how much noise that hen made passing that egg!"

I had a brother-in-law [may his soul rest in peace] who was a conscientious objector.  Used to say: "I'm not gonna eat something that comes out of a hen's azz."

Oct 16, 2021 - 5:17:38 PM
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figmo59

USA

34447 posts since 3/5/2008

Owen i did think a critter had gotten inta the chickin coup that day..
Quite the rawcuss... :0/

Oct 16, 2021 - 7:27:46 PM

csrat

USA

894 posts since 9/14/2008

We had chickens when I was a pup. My mom would always get excited when we cracked open a double yolker.

I stopped taking my surplus tomatoes, cukes and eggplants to the local, church based pantries because the recipients didn't want them! Now I just give them to my neighbors. Very few church pantries hereabouts anymore. The churches discovered that the folks coming in continued to grow in number and were often vocally displeased with their offerings. My church now adopts 5 families at a time and works with them to get the food they need and move toward a time when they won't need a food pantry. Results have been mixed.

Oct 17, 2021 - 2:07:14 AM
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4016 posts since 4/22/2018

We tend to get double yolks from young hens in their first few months of laying. After that things settle down so to speak. The pure joy of frying a double yolker, laying it your sandwich and then slicing it so you have an intact yolk in each half is indescribable.

Oct 17, 2021 - 4:47:47 AM
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rinemb

USA

14116 posts since 5/24/2005

I like to buy fresh eggs when I am out in the "rurals" on jobs. I have to remember the old mom's rule: always crack your eggs in a separate dish-not in your bowl of flour/batter fixins.
Brad

Oct 17, 2021 - 6:13:45 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21235 posts since 6/30/2015
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quote:
Originally posted by csrat

We had chickens when I was a pup. My mom would always get excited when we cracked open a double yolker.

I stopped taking my surplus tomatoes, cukes and eggplants to the local, church based pantries because the recipients didn't want them! Now I just give them to my neighbors. Very few church pantries hereabouts anymore. The churches discovered that the folks coming in continued to grow in number and were often vocally displeased with their offerings. My church now adopts 5 families at a time and works with them to get the food they need and move toward a time when they won't need a food pantry. Results have been mixed.


It seems to me that the less people pay for something, the more they complain about it. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 7:47:25 AM

Owen

Canada

9810 posts since 6/5/2011

Dave, are you ^^ talking generally about that those that could afford to pay more?  ... or those that, for whatever reason, have next to nothing to pay with?  .... or ???? 

I found this book quite worthwhile: https://www.amazon.ca/Wisdom-Homeless-Lessons-Learned-Shelter/dp/1525531387

Oct 17, 2021 - 8:03:08 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21235 posts since 6/30/2015
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I've seen ungratefulness in all groups. But I worked with underprivileged, and I worked with homeless, and I've worked in homeless kitchens. 18 years in public education in inner city schools showed me that free education is not valued. Neither is free lunch. The food that I saw thrown away in the cafeteria astounded me. People who have earned what they have, in general, take better care, and show more respect for what they have. How anyone in a free food line can complain about the food provided is beyond me.

 

Edit to add: This isn't an all, or everyone thing, just a generalization made through my own observations.  Some people were certainly grateful, and thankful for what was provided to them when they were in need, but many complained, or threw away good food - especially fresh fruit and vegetables.

Edited by - DC5 on 10/17/2021 08:05:37

Oct 17, 2021 - 10:41:47 AM

Owen

Canada

9810 posts since 6/5/2011

Dave, your work with marginalized people outshines mine, and I tip my toque to you.  Bill-e has started threads in the past about words and the meanings they convey.... is your last sentence an example? .... would the implication change appreciably if "some" and "many" were interchanged?

I don't make a point of searching out examples, but, fwiw, the widespread use of convenience/junk foods and food wastage on the remote reserves made an impression on my wife and I.

Oct 17, 2021 - 11:24:29 AM
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banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11698 posts since 2/22/2007

--"It seems to me that the less people pay for something, the more they complain about it. --"

I learned in retail to never, ever do "free". The most unsatisfied customer that I ever had was the winner of a radio contest we ran and she won a free bedroom suite. I have never had so many complaints, and there was nothing wrong with the furniture or the delivery, but this lady simply could not be satisfied, unlike the dozens of customers who paid over $5K for that same outfit and always seemed to love it. See, the prize was the prize but she decided that she was entitled to return for the full cash price and seemed to think it criminal that I refused, and then proceeded to find flaw after endless flaw. My final communication was "so give it away or throw it away but never call me again".

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:29:21 PM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

21235 posts since 6/30/2015
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Dave, your work with marginalized people outshines mine, and I tip my toque to you.  Bill-e has started threads in the past about words and the meanings they convey.... is your last sentence an example? .... would the implication change appreciably if "some" and "many" were interchanged?

I don't make a point of searching out examples, but, fwiw, the widespread use of convenience/junk foods and food wastage on the remote reserves made an impression on my wife and I.


Either word would work, but the complainers were louder, so it sure seemed like many.  The grateful quietly ate their food.

I had a great issue with the public schools.  Federal and state guidelines required us to put fresh fruit on every tray in the cafeteria, and most of the students threw the fruit in the trash untouched.  This was very wasteful so I wanted to have them put the fruit into a collection basket and we could donate it to a homeless shelter.  State law forbid this from happening.  You cannot give food that has already been served, and because these students had been given the food, we could not give it away again.  This is changing in some jurisdictions, but I don't think it has yet where I worked. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:47:51 PM

csrat

USA

894 posts since 9/14/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DC5

I've seen ungratefulness in all groups. But I worked with underprivileged, and I worked with homeless, and I've worked in homeless kitchens. 18 years in public education in inner city schools showed me that free education is not valued. Neither is free lunch. The food that I saw thrown away in the cafeteria astounded me. People who have earned what they have, in general, take better care, and show more respect for what they have. How anyone in a free food line can complain about the food provided is beyond me.

 

Edit to add: This isn't an all, or everyone thing, just a generalization made through my own observations.  Some people were certainly grateful, and thankful for what was provided to them when they were in need, but many complained, or threw away good food - especially fresh fruit and vegetables.


That was my experience. As I walked into the church one Friday I saw a woman walk out with a family food box. She stopped at the garbage can we had near the parking lot door and threw away 4 bell peppers, 4 tomatoes and 2 eggplants. The chips and Little Debbie's were kept. She could have offered the produce to neighbors but they never made it to her car.

My company sent volunteers to work on Thursday nights for The Kids Food Basket. This group packed a basic bag lunch that was given to kids as they left school on Friday afternoons. The idea was that these kids didn't get enough to eat on weekends. The teachers told us the kids generally threw everything out except the bag of chips and two pack of cookies. One school told us to stop sending the bags because the garbage cans smelled bad if they didn't get emptied before Monday morning.

Here's the thing. Every child on the free lunch program got a weekend bag lunch. They didn't ask for them. Their parents didn't ask for them. In one school district 83% of the elementary students were on this program. The powers that be said they should get them, so that food was all wasted. 

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