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Sep 29, 2021 - 6:04:32 PM

14019 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by DRH

Ken;

I had many hours of frustration trying to intonate the six string with your bridge. Then I realized the angle of rotation was even more critical than position. Rotating allows me to hone in on the sweet spot. The effect is different than what one gets with a straight bridge. It's better.

Who knew an asthetic arc could do more than just stabilize the bridge? Well, I'm sure you knew, as do most of the people reading this thread. In my case it was a good mental exercise.


I didn't think about the moon bridge as it would affect a 6-string—they do a good job of correcting the problems with the third string on banjos, but a 6-string is a different thing all together.  You would absolutely have to rotate it so the bass side slopes towards the tailpiece

Maybe the curve is overkill and something more subtle like the compensated saddle on a guitar might work better, but rotated like they are on guitars

Sep 30, 2021 - 7:34:06 AM
likes this

YellowSkyBlueSun

Virgin Islands (U.S.)

437 posts since 5/11/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan


Remove the ebony, make the top part as thin as possible, and then flip it over. I wonder what that would sound like?

Sep 30, 2021 - 1:57:51 PM

14019 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by YellowSkyBlueSun
quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan


Remove the ebony, make the top part as thin as possible, and then flip it over. I wonder what that would sound like?

 


For a reason I don't understand, it's common practice with banjo ukuleles to put a popsicle stick under the bridge—you could take something like a small popsicle stick, glue 5 little dowels onto it and have one dowel support each string.

Oct 1, 2021 - 4:05:10 AM

2897 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

Flipping it over would work until the first stroke from Bluegrass or Clawhammer. The base of bridges are wider than the top to prevent tipping over. Older bridges where monolithic. Tipping over is a problem to be aware of.

Also, the wide bases prevent bridge movement. Monolithic bridges move frequently. This especially true when playing aggressively.

My first banjo was an old Gretsch. It came with an assortment of bridges. Before the internet, stores had what stores had. Today, options are plentiful. Having a quality bridge makes an marketable improvement.

Nothing wrong with dreaming. Weight and use cases should be considered. At the present, I grab the base to set intonation. Imagine having to push all 5 legs to achieve proper intonation.

Right now, I can tell when the bridge has tilted forward or backwards. I can also know visually and sonically when the grimace turns into a smirk.

Other bridge builders have specialized with individual inserts of material. Custom Inlays sells fossilized walrus and mammoth pieces embedded in their bridges as an option.

As described by Ken LeVan, I would like to see it’s demonstrated use and compare it with my abuse.

Edited by - Aradobanjo on 10/01/2021 04:06:41

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