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Sep 23, 2021 - 3:01:43 PM
285 posts since 10/30/2007

Continuing with my efforts to help my Bluegrass-picking friend in a Jazz ensemble class we are taking, I first wanted to share a method of making and figuring out four-note Jazz chords. The following letters in the order given - and repeated - is a very useful tool for doing this: FACEGBD, or . . .
FACEGBDFACEGBDFACEGBD etc. You can see in the PDF file that I have changed the style of the repeating FACEGBDs.

On page (1) of the PDG file, for the seven regular chords (i.e, using scale notes) in the key of C, the FACEGBD&repeat order is followed from the 4th string to 1st string in G tuning (gDGBD). In whatever key you are in, this will also work, but accents (#s & bs) must be used . . . F# instead of F in the key of G, Bb instead of B in key of F, F# and C# instead of F and C in the key of D, etc.

On page (2) of the PDF file, the seven regular chords in the key of C are repeated in the page (1) order, but the 4th to 1st string sequence is not followed. However, the same letter-notes that were utilized before are utilized here, with the letter name (of each named chord) shown on the 3rd, 2nd, or 1st string. See if you can place the missing three letter-notes and complete the seven regular chords. Got any more ways to play these seven chord?


Oct 8, 2021 - 9:57:49 PM
like this

666 posts since 6/8/2005

quote:
Originally posted by mikebanjo


Got any more ways to play these seven chord?


Hello mikebanjo,

I applaud your quest for these chord forms. As per your invitation, I'd like to offer a couple of ideas, but I don't want to go on too long because it gets a bit involved.

What I can say briefly is that almost all chords come from scales. The other thing is that major chords are also minor chords in regard to their function and minor chords can therefore be substituted for major chords by way of their extended upper-partial chord tones.

Example:

G Major Seventh = G-B-D-F#

G Major Ninth = (G)-B=D=F#-A

B Minor Seventh = B-D-F#-A

Note the similarities. G Major Seventh is the root chord of the diatonic series of a G Major Scale and a B minor seventh chord (B-D-F#-A) is it's third degree or mode. If you extend a G Major Seventh chord to it's ninth, you have G-B-D-E#-A. Therefore, a Bm7 chord can substitute for a G Major Seventh Chord because it sounds like a G Major 9th chord, but without the G root. The main thing is that the three notes B-D-F# or a B minor triad are common to all three chords and function as a minor chord substitution for an extended major chord in the key of G.

Extended Dominant Seventh Chords function in close to the same manner, but with a few exceptions that are discretionary to a persons individual understanding.

All the best,

Pat-

patcloud.com 

Edited by - banjola1 on 10/08/2021 22:08:05

Oct 9, 2021 - 7:52:14 AM

285 posts since 10/30/2007

Pat,
Thanks for your reply. So far on this topic I have received 191 reads and 1 reply . .. yours! Back in the day, before the internet got up and running and mail was the only way to go (and I was just beginning to play the five-string banjo), I sent you a letter commenting on some article you had written AND you sent me a letter back, giving me then some good advise to further my understanding of banjo playing. Wish I still had that letter. But it just goes to show your continuing interest in helping out us struggling banjo pickers. Thanks for what you did then, and thanks again for what you are continuing to do now.

Oct 9, 2021 - 9:46:09 AM

666 posts since 6/8/2005

Yes! I do remember you. We meet again!

It's been a long time and we're still here. One thing I love about banjo players is that they find life-long friends in the spirit of  exploring the instrument and its music just for themselves. As a teenager I remember getting the Pete Seeger book, "How To Play the Five String Banjo." There was a song he wrote called, "The Goofing Off Suite." I think that sums it up for us. We love exploring and messing around and making up our own "stuff."

A well known jazz guitar player once told me that guitar was just another "musical noise-maker" and that certainly applies to banjo. It's just pure fun just to mess around with it.  It's the perfect instrument for musical experimentation. It's probably why we have Earl Scruggs.

Great to hear from you!

Pat-

patcloud.com
 

Oct 13, 2021 - 7:26:21 PM

Fathand

Canada

11794 posts since 2/7/2008

So what I am seeing is a group of moveable chord forms, most of which I use to play chords which you are calling regular chords?

I think of most of them like playing the barre, G and D formations and then adding or changing a finger. e.g. barre + 1st string 2 frets up turns into a 6th chord. G formation but play 1st string same fret as 2nd string becomes a 7th chord.
This way I don't have to remember a lot of note names, just the major chord form I start with and how to convert it if that makes any sense?

Oct 13, 2021 - 7:42:23 PM

666 posts since 6/8/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Fathand

So what I am seeing is a group of moveable chord forms, most of which I use to play chords which you are calling regular chords?

I think of most of them like playing the barre, G and D formations and then adding or changing a finger. e.g. barre + 1st string 2 frets up turns into a 6th chord. G formation but play 1st string same fret as 2nd string becomes a 7th chord.
This way I don't have to remember a lot of note names, just the major chord form I start with and how to convert it if that makes any sense?


Yes, I see what you mean.

My posts are only meant as suggestions.

Most all the chords shown are only in 3 different forms. A lot of stuff in G tuning comes in threes.

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