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Sep 23, 2021 - 6:37:01 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

I got to wondering...What is the name of our Sun, the Star of our solar system. So, through the wonders of Google, I looked it up. Only to discover, our sun has no name-no officially sanctioned name. Since 1922 the "International Astronomical Union" is the sanctioned organization that names all the stuff in the skies; planets, stars, asteroids, solar systems, galaxies, etc.
History and language has used different names/references. Such as "The Sun", "the sun", "Sol", Solis, and others. (Well there is a sun out there in every solar system-and many of those have names.)
Jeez, the source and provider of all life and control of our solar system, and it has no name. COME ON! WTHIUWT.
What a great project for science clubs around the world, or heck BHO, eh. Name our Sun, before its gone!

What would you like to name the sun, our Sun?

Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 6:49:27 AM
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Buddur

USA

3081 posts since 10/23/2004

Tom.

Yes, I vote to name the Sun "Tom".

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:07:49 AM

Jbo1

USA

1050 posts since 5/19/2007

For that matter, our moon, which has great affect to the earth, doesn't have a name either.

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:10:40 AM

Paul R

Canada

14994 posts since 1/28/2010

It seems we've, by default, given generic names to two bodies - the Sun and the Moon. Sort of like Girl Frieberg.

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:18:07 AM
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banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11579 posts since 2/22/2007
Online Now

Yeah, we call our sun, "Sun", and folks call their god, "God" too.

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:23:30 AM

YellowSkyBlueSun

Virgin Islands (U.S.)

416 posts since 5/11/2021

Sun (English), Helios (Greek), and Sol (Latin), are the most common names that we know today in the western world. But other cultures have their own names for it, of course. I'm sure that various Asian or African cultures have their own names for the Sun in their language.

The sun has surely been named thousands of times throughout human history. Why aren't any of those names legitimate or official? The "International Astronomical Union" has no inherent authority, more than any other science club does. Sanctioned by whom? The concept of a governing body claiming authority over the names of celestial objects is laughable, but not surprising in this day and age. (no politics!)

There's only one Solar System, the one we live in, and that's because we orbit a star we call Sol. Other star systems with planets in orbit are not "solar systems", they're planetary systems.

 

Our moon is named "Luna". But it's the same thing, there's lots of names. Cynthia and Selene are two other common names in the western world. But again, there's probably been thousands of names for the Moon throughout history, and none of them are any less legitimate or official than the others. 

Edited by - YellowSkyBlueSun on 09/23/2021 07:25:41

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:24:06 AM
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Trewq36

Canada

1923 posts since 11/30/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Buddur

Tom.

Yes, I vote to name the Sun "Tom".


And we can call the moon Jerry.

 

Lets hear it for Tom & Jerry!

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:25:16 AM

Owen

Canada

9561 posts since 6/5/2011

Ooops... too late on the draw!   

Edited by - Owen on 09/23/2021 07:26:08

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:25:30 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Buddur

Tom.

Yes, I vote to name the Sun "Tom".


You may be a bit vain or biased, eh.  ;-)

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:29:07 AM
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1975 posts since 2/4/2013

The suns of other solar systems are stars.

The Sun and Moon are not generic names. When the Moon was named there was only one known moon. Moon became a generic name when other moons were discovered. My guess is that when the Sun was called the Sun or Sol or whatever no one had worked out that the stars were also suns.

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:37:50 AM
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Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

We could have named the moon "Emmentaler" , but we spent too much money proving it was only a big rock.  wink Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:39:31 AM

343 posts since 1/26/2020

Liberal conspiracy. THANKS NOBAMA!!!

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:42:29 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by tbchappe

Liberal conspiracy. THANKS NOBAMA!!!


Now don't be go getting Sun and the Moon Topics banned due to "political."  Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:46:41 AM
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149 posts since 4/14/2021

What we call the sun is irrelevant, universally speaking. Is it not? An alien culture most likely has their own name for their sun, which we call something else. So most likely they have their own name for our sun as well. Do you think an alien culture whose planet orbits, for example Antares, calls their sun by that name?

So sometime in the distant future, we land on the third planet circling Antares. Our people jump out and say, "What's up people of Antares 3?"

And they go, "Whut? What the hellis Antares3?"

Call it what you will in whatever language you use. Everyone who speaks your language knows what you are talking about.

Letting others know your thoughts or actions.....Isn't that the fundamental purpose of language?

Edited by - Mikey Lawless on 09/23/2021 07:49:21

Sep 23, 2021 - 7:57:32 AM

343 posts since 1/26/2020

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb
quote:
Originally posted by tbchappe

Liberal conspiracy. THANKS NOBAMA!!!


Now don't be go getting Sun and the Moon Topics banned due to "political."  Brad


'Twas but a joke through absurdity.

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:07:58 AM

phb

Germany

2978 posts since 11/8/2010

quote:
Originally posted by YellowSkyBlueSun

Sun (English), Helios (Greek), and Sol (Latin), are the most common names that we know today in the western world. But other cultures have their own names for it, of course. I'm sure that various Asian or African cultures have their own names for the Sun in their language.

Various European cultures also have their own names for the sun in their language. And do belong to the Western world... cool

There is no way we can come up with a name for the sun and the moon because we first would have to decide on a gender for each which is taboo in these times. In German the sun (die Sonne) is female and the moon (der Mond) is male while in all languages of Latin origin it is the other way round. And I'm sure there is much more variety around the world than that.

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:09:25 AM
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Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by tbchappe
quote:
Originally posted by rinemb
quote:
Originally posted by tbchappe

Liberal conspiracy. THANKS NOBAMA!!!


Now don't be go getting Sun and the Moon Topics banned due to "political."  Brad


'Twas but a joke through absurdity.


So, exactly, was my response...Though, I was being sarcastic regarding ban on topics such as covid and climate change.  Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:12:24 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by phb
quote:
Originally posted by YellowSkyBlueSun

Sun (English), Helios (Greek), and Sol (Latin), are the most common names that we know today in the western world. But other cultures have their own names for it, of course. I'm sure that various Asian or African cultures have their own names for the Sun in their language.

Various European cultures also have their own names for the sun in their language. And do belong to the Western world... cool

There is no way we can come up with a name for the sun and the moon because we first would have to decide on a gender for each which is taboo in these times. In German the sun (die Sonne) is female and the moon (der Mond) is male while in all languages of Latin origin it is the other way round. And I'm sure there is much more variety around the world than that.

 


Well, that is a real Buzzz killer.  Got any "non-gender" names or terms handy, we can use.  Interesting though.  The sun is not an object I ever thought of with a gender in mind.  Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 09/23/2021 08:13:03

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:13:57 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

hmmmm. The woman in the sun....further thought, I get that. Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:17:28 AM

J e f f

USA

3712 posts since 12/16/2009

Earl

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:21:14 AM

Brian T

Canada

18703 posts since 6/5/2008

I have always(?)thought the sun had the Latin name: "SOL."
I am sol today .

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:44:22 AM
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phb

Germany

2978 posts since 11/8/2010

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb
The sun is not an object I ever thought of with a gender in mind.  Brad

That's because your language is agnostic of word genders and we all have grown up in cultures that have been monotheistic for a long time. When Western culture still implied polytheism, the Greeks and Romans thought of the sun as a powerful god with blinding and scorching powers while Germanic peoples living farther North enjoyed its warmth and the prosperity it gave. As for the moon, I have no idea why it was equaled to a female goddess (Latin) and male god (Germanic), respectively, but perhaps both cultures came up with the idea that the sun and the moon would form a nice couple and yet were so very different from each other...

Sep 23, 2021 - 8:58:11 AM

58248 posts since 12/14/2005

This discussion reminds me of a sci-fi story I read, many decades ago.

Astronaut lands on a planet, turns on his Interplanetary Translator, asks the native "Where am I?"

Well, if you've ever taken a shovel and turned over a bit of earth, you know that your home planet is called "Earth".
So the native says something, and the Intergalactic Translator knows it means "home planet", so it tells the astronaut "EARTH!"

And I agree with Buddur: We should call the moon "TOM", in honor of Tom Corbett, one of the most famous interplanetary heroes of the 1950's.

As for the SUN, lots of men call their sons "Junior", so why not call our sun "Junior"???

Sep 23, 2021 - 9:24:16 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by phb
quote:
Originally posted by rinemb
The sun is not an object I ever thought of with a gender in mind.  Brad

That's because your language is agnostic of word genders and we all have grown up in cultures that have been monotheistic for a long time. When Western culture still implied polytheism, the Greeks and Romans thought of the sun as a powerful god with blinding and scorching powers while Germanic peoples living farther North enjoyed its warmth and the prosperity it gave. As for the moon, I have no idea why it was equaled to a female goddess (Latin) and male god (Germanic), respectively, but perhaps both cultures came up with the idea that the sun and the moon would form a nice couple and yet were so very different from each other...

 


I don't know about German language so much, but that is why we struggle so much with French, there are too many  exceptions to the rules, regarding le les la, and though I don't speak French it actually seems rather random to me.  why is the la porte (door) and le jardin (garden).  Though French language leans masculine use over the feminine, i don't get it.  I guess as someone invented a word, it was his/her choice to make fem or masc?  Brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 9:25:16 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

13929 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

This discussion reminds me of a sci-fi story I read, many decades ago.

Astronaut lands on a planet, turns on his Interplanetary Translator, asks the native "Where am I?"

Well, if you've ever taken a shovel and turned over a bit of earth, you know that your home planet is called "Earth".
So the native says something, and the Intergalactic Translator knows it means "home planet", so it tells the astronaut "EARTH!"

And I agree with Buddur: We should call the moon "TOM", in honor of Tom Corbett, one of the most famous interplanetary heroes of the 1950's.

As for the SUN, lots of men call their sons "Junior", so why not call our sun "Junior"???


Now there is a reason for a name that makes sense to me. ;-)  brad

Sep 23, 2021 - 10:17:50 AM
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phb

Germany

2978 posts since 11/8/2010

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb

I don't know about German language so much, but that is why we struggle so much with French, there are too many  exceptions to the rules, regarding le les la, and though I don't speak French it actually seems rather random to me.  why is the la porte (door) and le jardin (garden).  Though French language leans masculine use over the feminine, i don't get it.  I guess as someone invented a word, it was his/her choice to make fem or masc? 


I have no idea where word genders come from. Most of the time they don't make much sense, it is just something that is there and that you have to accept. Sometimes word genders change over time and they can also vary from region to region. To complicate things, German (certainly one of the more confusing languages around) has three genders, female, male and neuter. Of our four cases many forms coincide with others from the same or a different gender which makes it even more confusing because there is no clear system. Strange to think that Germans of all people came up with something that didn't rely on a set of clear working principles but has more exceptions than rules.

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