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Sep 19, 2021 - 8:47:49 AM
1717 posts since 4/13/2017

Been working on this resonator. Started the staing process by sanding to 220, spraying with water, then sanding to 320. I then rubbed a base coat of red food coloring. Once the base coat was dry, I rubbed a coat of Light Walnut Arti dye from Highland Woodworking. I then proceeded to spray several seal coats of shellac. After the second time of buffing the shellac, I noticed these little "voids" in my color. You can see them in the attached photo. How might I remedy this?


 

Sep 19, 2021 - 9:01:29 AM
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88 posts since 5/27/2019

If you're talking about the lighter spots along the binding edge, that could be from excess glue sealing the wood so the stain didn't penetrate. Otherwise, it looks nice.

Sep 19, 2021 - 9:05:28 AM

1717 posts since 4/13/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Uke-alot

If you're talking about the lighter spots along the binding edge, that could be from excess glue sealing the wood so the stain didn't penetrate. Otherwise, it looks nice.


That's exactly what I was talking about. Is there a way I can cover those up?

Sep 19, 2021 - 9:23:30 AM

88 posts since 5/27/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Lemon Banjo and Supply
quote:
Originally posted by Uke-alot

If you're talking about the lighter spots along the binding edge, that could be from excess glue sealing the wood so the stain didn't penetrate. Otherwise, it looks nice.


That's exactly what I was talking about. Is there a way I can cover those up?


If my theory is correct, it may be difficult to get it to stain right without sanding that part back to bare wood.  Which obviously you would like to avoid because it would negate a lot of your work.  Hopefully someone else will chime in with a better idea.  What kind of glue did you use for the bindings?

Sep 19, 2021 - 9:27:35 AM

12296 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Lemon Banjo and Supply

... I noticed these little "voids" in my color. You can see them in the attached photo. How might I remedy this?


"Paint" over them with tinted dewaxed shellac. You'll have to scrape the binding. And might have to carefully sand or scrape at the seam of your touchup and the surrounding wood in case dark streaks develop.

Color in the clear coat instead of the wood is how Gibson did a lot of its finishes over the years -- and what made some of them difficult to impossible to repair.

Color in clear coat is called "toning." Color applied to a sealer coat is called "glazing." You could conceivably apply a thicker color solution to the "void" areas, let it dry a bit, then dry-brush it to take it back to the level of color you want. But I think applying tinted/toned shellac (or even lacquer) will do the job.

Edited to add: Jim is right that the best repair, unfortunately, is sanding down to bare wood and starting over.

Edited by - Old Hickory on 09/19/2021 09:40:50

Sep 19, 2021 - 9:54:24 AM

rcc56

USA

3754 posts since 2/20/2016

I concur with what Jim said about the binding glue inhibiting the coloring process. And if you used CA for the bindings, it might augment the problem.

Also, I see areas of tear-out in the edge of the binding channel. These spots will show no matter what finishing technique you use, except perhaps to buy a burn-in kit and fill those spots with colored stick shellac, and then you will have problems getting a color match. It might work, it might not. I have yet to use the burn-in technique. It is an old-fashioned repair technique, and from what I understand, takes practice to master. Burn-in kits might be a bit hard to find, and not very cheap.

But the best solution that I know is a lot of work, and that is to cut the binding out with a router, re-cut the binding channel 1 mm or so farther down the sidewall to eliminate the torn out spots, install new binding with a good binding cement [not CA], sand to bare wood, and re-stain. In that order. A lot of work.  And if the resonator side wall is veneered, there is a risk of sanding through the outer layer.

Welcome to the repair business.  It's a touchy business.  Problems occur no matter how conscientious your work is, and they have to be solved without creating more damage.  I'm having to negotiate a problem on an instrument right now, and it's taking a long time.  Part of the cause is the way a previous repairman executed his repair, and part of it was a mistake on my part.  Oh well . . . it comes with the territory.

Edited by - rcc56 on 09/19/2021 10:01:29

Sep 19, 2021 - 11:42:53 AM
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288 posts since 8/7/2007

Hunter,

I have experienced this problem many times in the past but it can be taken care of. Of course, it is much easier to avoid it than it is to hide it. Some times I do not have the luxury of waiting for regular glue to dry and I use CA glue and yes sometimes too much glue gets applied.

I also sand smooth and then re-wet to raise the grain just to make sure all scratches are gone and to get everything as smooth as possible but I do it a little different. Here is how to avoid this problem in the future.

Before you install the binding, “pre-stain” the piece you are working on. It does not mater if it is mahogany or maple, a style 3 color or a sunburst. We use water based stain so we get the grain raising we are looking for and it also puts color, IT PUTS COLOR, under any glue squeeze out that may happen and hey no more light areas. Once you install the binding you are going to sand everything smooth so most of the stain is going to disappear but I guarantee you that this will definitely help. Tip.... works great on style 3 rings.

If you find out too late. Transtint in super thinned down lacquer in an airbrush works great. If you do not want to spend several hundred bucks, a few brown markers and a black marker and a bit of time can really hide a lot.

The pic attached is of a resonator that is getting a burst stain job. The dark brown stain you can see was applied before the binding was installed and is just there to mitigate any grief from glue squeeze out.

Hope this helps,

Eric


 

Sep 19, 2021 - 11:52:21 AM
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heavy5

USA

1877 posts since 11/3/2016

Unless you're going re-cut the slot , I'd suggest you mask off the binding w/ GOOD quality masking tape to try to avoid any touch up getting where it shouldn't on the res sides .
If it does bleed thru , I've had pretty good luck thru the yrs using the tip of an exacto blade or a single edge razor blade scraping off unwanted finish going VERY LIGHTLY so as not to make an irregular surface --- it takes lots of practice . Also if u successfully add color by some of the good methods mentioned above , the mask can protect the binding from gentle wet sanding &/or rubbing compound on the repaired area . I've used Sharpie marking pens many times to shade an area w/ pretty good results even smearing it before dry w/ a finger tip if its too dark .

Edited by - heavy5 on 09/19/2021 11:56:42

Sep 19, 2021 - 2:27:47 PM

1717 posts since 4/13/2017

Issue has been resolved. I'll post a picture tomorrow! Thanks guys!

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