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Sep 17, 2021 - 3:08:31 PM
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645 posts since 8/9/2008

The stars *finally* aligned where I had a decent piece of meat, enough time and enough people to cook for, so I did a small pork butt on the BGE today. This was to be my first real low n slow. 
7.5 hours to get to 200 internal, oven running slightly hot at 270-290 over that time, but it was darned tasty. Covered it in parchment paper for the last few hours of the cook.  Big success with the wife & in-laws. 
I noticed that the temp rose once the wood chunk had burned off (ie no more smoke). Is that a 'thing'? Further tips welcome!

marc




Sep 17, 2021 - 4:55:24 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

Hi Marc! I have a Primo XL but it's the same type of cooking & have done some long low & slows.

We have done some 18 hour smokes so I can tell you what works for me.

First I'm sure you are using lump charcoal & not briquettes. Lump comes in all different sized chunks.

I like to break open the whole bag in a tote & see what you got. I separate it out from big to small.

I'm sure there's air holes in the bottom of your firebox. Take some big pieces & use them to cover the holes. If they have a curved side put that down over the hole to let it breathe.

Go from big to small to fill it up with space between to breathe. Don't just dump it in there.  If there's charcoal left from the last cook you can mix that in as you go. Save some half burned pieces to put in your starter spot.

I use chunks & chips of wood for smoke. I bury some chunks close to the top & sprinkle chips on top.

Make a dent in the top layer & put some half burned & fresh charcoal in there, add some chips & that's your starter spot. I use a piezo propane torch on that spot. Mapp gas is better because it doesn't go out as easily when you point it down.

Just get it going, shut the lid & open your vents. As soon as it's smoking good snorkel down your vents.

Your meat should be rubbed & ready. Drip pan set underneath. Put the meat on when the temp starts to rise. Aim for *220-*250.

The thing with this kind of cooking is they are easy to heat up but hard to cool down. Keep your vents more closed & try to slowly reach your temp instead of going over it. We set ours the same every time now & as long as it isn't too windy we can set ours overnight. Sometimes we've left it going & ran up to the store for more supplies!

I'm going to the Green Egg site after this but I'm pretty sure most of this applies. I wish I had one too!

Now you've had success there's a lot more to experiment with! Check out Amazing Ribs for ideas.

 

 

 

-

Sep 17, 2021 - 5:04:37 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

They look like a meteorite Eh?!

Sep 17, 2021 - 5:31:39 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

I just got back from the Green Egg site. Yes! They are nicely made. I would love to try one.

They all have a vent on the bottom & a damper on the stack. Like a woodstove.

When we first got the Primo Terry used to bake bread & buns in it!

Sep 17, 2021 - 5:49:58 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18704 posts since 6/5/2008

Congratulations on a very successful cook. You know? It just looks "right." Appetizing to me.
I hope you are really happy with that.
Next has to be a few racks of ribs and chickens. I never expect guests to eat it all but they usually turn into pigs and clean the platter.

You have dry rub mixes of herbs & spices? You have a couple of apple juice or apple cider wet mops to slather all over the meat?

I am on a quest for the perfect very fine slice cole slaw dressing recipe. At the local pub, I usually have Calamari and their slaw needs a double serving! They won't sell the dressing recipe.

Sep 17, 2021 - 5:58:30 PM
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AGACNP

USA

197 posts since 10/12/2011

“I noticed that the temp rose once the wood chunk had burned off (ie no more smoke). Is that a 'thing'?”

Perhaps you are talking about “the stall?” About 150 degrees internal, the temp rise slows WAY down for a couple hours!

Marc, that butt looks fantastic!

Hey Bob, I've got the same cooker you have! And, I agree with your recommendation of the Amazing Ribs site!

Edited by - AGACNP on 09/17/2021 18:02:05

Sep 17, 2021 - 6:17:51 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

Bruce! I know a guy whose father inlaw was in the armed forces. When he was stationed in Japan he bought some type of Komodo  cooker & brought it home with him. My buddy was offered it but he didn't get how to use it so he declined. Ouch! 

Sep 17, 2021 - 6:31:44 PM
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AGACNP

USA

197 posts since 10/12/2011

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Bruce! I know a guy whose father inlaw was in the armed forces. When he was stationed in Japan he bought some type of Komodo  cooker & brought it home with him. My buddy was offered it but he didn't get how to use it so he declined. Ouch! 


Ouch indeed! But, I totally understand not getting how to use a Komodo cooker. Ive really had quite a learning curve myself!

Sep 17, 2021 - 7:58:29 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

We did some pizzas on the top rack at 6 or 7 hundred degrees for a minute?

We ran in & ate our masterpieces. The Primo got so hot it welded the gasket shut!

Had to use a butter knife to get it to open up again.

I ordered a new one that is supposedly a gasket from a STOL jump jet. 

It stays in place when you use High temp copper head gasket cement to hold it.

The gasket fell off our new airtight stove so I bought the replacement kit. I used the the kit according to the instructions. It had a watery adhesive like crazy glue & fell off again in record time!

I read up on it & someone recommended the head gasket stuff. Years later it's still on there. 

Sep 17, 2021 - 8:21:16 PM

AGACNP

USA

197 posts since 10/12/2011

quote:
Originally posted by daytripper

The stars *finally* aligned where I had a decent piece of meat, enough time and enough people to cook for, so I did a small pork butt on the BGE today. This was to be my first real low n slow. 
7.5 hours to get to 200 internal, oven running slightly hot at 270-290 over that time, but it was darned tasty. Covered it in parchment paper for the last few hours of the cook.  Big success with the wife & in-laws. 
I noticed that the temp rose once the wood chunk had burned off (ie no more smoke). Is that a 'thing'? Further tips welcome!

marc


Hey Marc,

What woods do you have available for smoking in the UK? Here, I use native hickory a lot, but have turned to apple and pecan lately, seems to give a little sweeter taste...

Sep 17, 2021 - 11:57:13 PM

3891 posts since 4/22/2018

Fine looking cook there Marc - we’ll done mate, satisfying isn’t it? When you say the temp went up when the smoke disappeared do you mean the cook chamber temp or the meat temp?

Sep 18, 2021 - 5:14:18 AM
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rinemb

USA

13932 posts since 5/24/2005

Bob, same origin on my aging cooker.  I replaced guts of it with stock BGE parts.  It was not a hard enamel finish, rather it was a green paint. Not much paint left on it, the original ceramic top weathered and broke (it was cool, you tilted it a bit to change its air flow) the cast iron daisy wheel works much better. Every year I fear it will not survive another cook or another winter. Last year I replaced sliding bottom vent and the felt gaskets.


Sep 18, 2021 - 5:17:25 AM
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rinemb

USA

13932 posts since 5/24/2005

By the way, nice hunts of meat there!
Another pic with the thermometer I installed, and the Japanese inscription.


 

Sep 18, 2021 - 7:40:39 AM

3892 posts since 7/8/2010

I was informed by a BGE representative that the original owner wanted to be able to effectively raise temp over 300 degrees. So, he went to NASA and started using the same materials used in the space shuttles.
Now, temps can actually reach 1200 to 1400 degrees without damage to the unit.

Sep 18, 2021 - 10:24:18 AM
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645 posts since 8/9/2008

Hey guys - thanks for the tips..!

I have a grill thermometer which showed a temp rise which seemed to coincide with the end of the smoke coming from the unit... While the grill temp was 270-290, the dome thermometer stayed around 225 the whole time. Which is the temp I should be using for a reading..? I made minute adjustments to the vents to drop the (grill) temp when it hit 290.

I bought a box of hickory chunks and that was the smoke source.

The internal temp slowed its rise around 150 but it didn't seem like a full-on stall. The piece of meat was pretty small, would feed 5 hungry people.

I've done pizzas in the unit a few times - smash the vents open and away you go. Lovely. Also a chicken, chilli. But this was my first proper looong smoke. 

Edited by - daytripper on 09/18/2021 10:42:31

Sep 18, 2021 - 10:47:30 AM

Banjo Lefty

Canada

2365 posts since 6/19/2014

I love my Green Egg! I smoke chickens in it regularly. First, though, I clean the ash out of the bottom, then stir up the charcoal left over from the last cook, making sure that the holes in the bottom of the fire box aren't clogged. Then I add fresh lump charcoal, and two chunks of hickory, one dry, and the other presoaked in water for at least an hour. Light the BBQ with the vents full open. When the charcoal has caught, the chicken goes in the the vents get shut down -- I know from experience where to set them -- 250 degrees for four hours is usually right. My unit holds steady with very little adjustment, and I never need to add fuel. A good meat thermometer is a must, however; the internal temp of the chicken needs to be around 170 degrees.

I have also done brisket, but without the hickory chunks. Six hours at 275 does it, but is the cut is a little thick I might go as high as 300.

Sep 18, 2021 - 1:31:29 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18704 posts since 6/5/2008

No matter what the rub or mop is, I'm a big fan of apple wood for smoke.
Tried others and got complaints of bitterness. So be it.
West coast tradition is alder for salmon and shellfish like clams on a string.

I bought a Breville "smoke pistol." I can squirt that into the kitchen oven with apple sawdust
a dozen time for the first hour and not set off the smoke alarm! Makes the oven smell pretty good for a week after.

Sep 18, 2021 - 8:37:10 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

We've done turkeys wild & domestic . ducks, pheasants & many, many chickens. We discovered to cook them closer to oven temps around *325 or *350. Poultry really absorbs the smoke & goes rubbery at low temps.

The hardwood lump alone gives a nice smokey taste & you end up with a crispy on the outside & tender & juicy on the inside chicken.

I think the BGE has an accessory made out of ceramic called the chicken setter. 

We use one of those metal & beer can chicken holders without the  beer can. 7 bucks at the hardware store.

Sep 18, 2021 - 8:41:22 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

 

Click for Large Version

Here'e a pair of dancers just startin out!

Sep 19, 2021 - 5:19:22 AM
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rinemb

USA

13932 posts since 5/24/2005

Bob, I am envious of that oval shape . Seems you can do so much more…Like TWO dancing chickens . Brad

Sep 21, 2021 - 8:39:28 AM
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rinemb

USA

13932 posts since 5/24/2005

So, with the ceramic cookers, I wonder what the temperature differential is: high up in the top of the lid to down nearer the grill grate or ceramic diffuser. Do the stand up chickens cook more on top then at the bottom?  I guess my thought would be since the air is in motion (like a convection oven) that temps are balanced?
Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 09/21/2021 08:40:27

Sep 21, 2021 - 8:44:27 AM
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rinemb

USA

13932 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb

By the way, nice hunts of meat there!
Another pic with the thermometer I installed, and the Japanese inscription.


In the earlier post with the pic, can anybody read Japanese?  Curious what is says.  Where is Scott when you need him?  Brad

Sep 22, 2021 - 6:21:13 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15323 posts since 9/27/2007

I haven't tried the ceramic chicken setter cookers but the ones in my pic lets the heat go up & through the bird to cook it inside & out. I have lots of rosemary, sage & thyme & a square stainless tube with holes in it I fill with herbs & wood chips. Pull the skin away from the breast meat & stuff with herb butter. You can use 5 spice powder or your own homemade rub.

The pan under the cooker is too small to catch all the fat from a nice farm raised chicken. I use dollar store aluminum pie plates for drip pans or improvise with aluminum foil. Those square oven bottom liners can be bent up at the corners to make a drip catcher too.  You don't want that grease in your firebox. 

Spatchcocking a chicken or turkey is a good way to make sure it's perfectly cooked.

I have a recipe for Jerk chicken I use with my little smoke box stuffed full of allspice berries, chips & herbs.

There's the deal where you have to burp your cooker. If you open it too fast it lets in air & does the back flash where it singes your beard & maybe your eyebrows!

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