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Sep 6, 2021 - 2:48:37 PM
8 posts since 7/10/2021

Hey guys! This is Jesse here. I was wondering if anyone out there knows of any learning materials (i.e. tab books, instructional videos) for up neck melodic and/or closed cell melodic for playing in all keys without a capo, while still using the melodic style. People who use what I'm looking for include folks such as Noam Pikelny, Larry McNeely, Alan Munde, and others. Thank you so much, and I'd really appreciate any tips or recommendations.

Sep 6, 2021 - 3:01:14 PM
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1566 posts since 11/17/2018

I started with Trischka's "Melodic Banjo" book.

Sep 6, 2021 - 3:07:18 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26397 posts since 8/3/2003

Alan Munde has several instruction books out. Might take a look at them. Go here: almundesbanjocollege.com/.

You might check out melbay.com and see if he has any books on melodic banjo.

I don't know whether Noam Pikelny or Larry McNeely have any books out or not, but if they do, someone will probably let you know how to contact them.

Sep 6, 2021 - 3:13:41 PM
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Foote

USA

519 posts since 3/25/2009

I would also recommend Trischka's Melodic Banjo. I also recommend his Master collection of fiddle tunes for banjo, primarily melodic arrangements.

Sep 6, 2021 - 3:41:03 PM
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8 posts since 7/10/2021

Thank you guys! I've heard a lot of great things about Melodic Banjo by Tony, so I just ordered it. I'll look at the Alan Munde books as well. I was hoping to find something that gave me the raw "tools" like scales and such, instead of just song transcriptions, so I'll give mel bay a look as well.

Sep 6, 2021 - 4:57:38 PM
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Bill H

USA

1728 posts since 11/7/2010

Noam has a class on Artist Works.

Sep 6, 2021 - 6:13:48 PM
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50 posts since 2/25/2020

If you're looking for the raw tools, Noam or Tony's artistworks courses are really the way to go - they go super in depth into everything! Noam's will also focus on a lot of single string, so which one you choose depends on what style you want to play.

Sep 6, 2021 - 6:54:11 PM
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12278 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Jbanjo056

Hey guys! This is Jesse here. I was wondering if anyone out there knows of any learning materials (i.e. tab books, instructional videos) for up neck melodic and/or closed cell melodic for playing in all keys without a capo, while still using the melodic style. 


As already mentioned, Noam has a school on Artistworks. He has four lessons -- about 75 minutes total -- on 4- and 5-note closed cells. They're in his Advanced section.

Right now, you can get $100 off a 12-month subscription or 20% off a 3-month subscription with the code LEARN20.  It's possible that you can get 25% off with the code AWUP25, but that came from a third-party site.

Anyway, even with a 3-month subscription, you can download all the lesson tabs -- and there are plenty -- to keep forever even if you never get around to watching the lessons.  You can't download the videos; you can only watch them while your subscription is active.

Tony's Melodic Banjo book is still a valuable resource. It provides the basics of melodic technique and examples from the then-leading exponents of it.  But there have been developments in melodic technique since its publication -- such as the closed cells you're asking about. And there are many new artists on the scene -- Noam among them -- whose work is not reflected there.

Check out some the YouTube videos of Ricky Mier. He has recently posted his contest-winning version of Temperance Reel. He sells the tab.  It could keep you busy for a long time.

Sep 6, 2021 - 6:56:49 PM
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29 posts since 12/2/2020

trischkas melodic book, after that learning songs are the best thing to do, but to really understand how it works that book by trischka is amazing.

also learn a lot of celtic fiddle/whistle tunes that are melodic that helps. working things out yourself can be a big advantage just seeing how the scales move up and down

Sep 6, 2021 - 10:37:40 PM

8 posts since 7/10/2021

Thanks guys! I'll look into the artist works. I've heard that it is a great resource, though a little more money than I wanted to spend. I really wanted something in hard copy.... yeah I know I'm old school, but you know how it goes. You gotta pay to play! The promo codes would definitely help though.

Sep 7, 2021 - 1:23:40 AM
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phb

Germany

2978 posts since 11/8/2010

Janet Davis has a book on melodic banjo.

Sep 7, 2021 - 6:49:20 AM
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2580 posts since 5/2/2012

It looks like Ned Luberecki has a series of video lessons on Trufire.
I am familiar with the Janet Davis book. I first picked it up as a beginner, about 6 months into learning Scruggs style. It proved to be quite challenging, so I put it aside for several months. When I went back to it, it was much more approachable, and I was able to learn to play several tunes. I'm not sure what "closed cell" means, but I will assume it means the little patterns/scales that are part of the melodic style, and the Davis book has these. And you will probably want to check out Bill Keith.

Sep 7, 2021 - 7:35:39 AM
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chuckv97

Canada

59571 posts since 10/5/2013

Ned also has a series of 3 books with Alfred Music. Books 2 and 3 cover melodic style.
nedski.com/complete-banjo-method

Sep 7, 2021 - 9:46:58 AM
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12278 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Jbanjo056

Thanks guys! I'll look into the artist works. I've heard that it is a great resource, though a little more money than I wanted to spend. I really wanted something in hard copy.... yeah I know I'm old school, but you know how it goes. You gotta pay to play! The promo codes would definitely help though.


I'm with you in wanting hard copy. But PDFs I can store on my computer or iPad are the next best thing. I can print them out and put them in a book. Or take my pad to read them anywhere without needing internet.

I was also going to suggest Ned Luberecki's books 2 and 3, which from the tables of contents and limited previews look good. But Noam specifically teaches the closed cells you were asking about.

Sep 7, 2021 - 10:05:50 AM
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111 posts since 7/22/2012

Here are a couple vids you might enjoy (maybe you haven't seen them yet) before the Tony Trischka book arrives...

youtube.com/watch?v=4AlozD4Smt4

youtube.com/watch?v=Q3QlfvOOt9c

Sep 7, 2021 - 1:09:29 PM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

Although a big fan of one on one, in your face lessons, the internet opens a lot of doors, or windows, into what everyone else is doing.  For example, pulling up one of the links posted, you tube also throws up relative links on the subject. Everything from Bill Keith to Allison Brown &  Jens Kruger. Wander to where ever turns you on. You can spend hours checking all that stuff out. If even a fraction of all that stuff sticks, it is time well spent.

Sep 7, 2021 - 1:59:46 PM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

Sep 7, 2021 - 11:39:17 PM
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Tommy5

USA

3898 posts since 2/22/2009

I am currently going through Neds video lessons on melodic banjo on true fire. He has other lessons on back- up and licks.

Sep 8, 2021 - 3:27:04 AM
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Bill H

USA

1728 posts since 11/7/2010

I am fairly new to learning fingerstyle after years of playing claw hammer. I am very attracted to melodic style and single string. The exercise I have been doing lately is to use Tabledit to transcribe the notation of fiddle tunes into tab. Then I map out the picking pattern to get a note for note arrangement. This has been a good exercise for me, to both learn to read music and to learn the fretboard. The music I use is from a multi-instrument string band class I attend weekly. The class is not teaching any technique--it is each individual's choice how they play the tune--melody or rhythm, or fingerstyle or claw hammer. (I am the only banjo)

Sep 9, 2021 - 4:50:47 PM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Bill H

I am fairly new to learning fingerstyle after years of playing claw hammer. I am very attracted to melodic style and single string. The exercise I have been doing lately is to use Tabledit to transcribe the notation of fiddle tunes into tab. Then I map out the picking pattern to get a note for note arrangement. This has been a good exercise for me, to both learn to read music and to learn the fretboard. The music I use is from a multi-instrument string band class I attend weekly. The class is not teaching any technique--it is each individual's choice how they play the tune--melody or rhythm, or fingerstyle or claw hammer. (I am the only banjo)


I think that's the way Bill Keith worked out the tabs for the Scruggs book, albeit pre Tabledit.
There is a lot to be said for figuring something out yourself, vs copying what someone else has figured out.

Sep 10, 2021 - 6:41:27 AM
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Bill H

USA

1728 posts since 11/7/2010

JD, Absolutely. I get lost without tab, but since I have been working out my own tabs I have been understanding the chord structure better and learning the fretboard and the name of the notes I am playing. Tabledit is a big help. I can start with a very basic melody line, then work out what I add to the spaces in between and the picking pattern. I find an arrangement will evolve over a week of practice time with a tune.

Sep 10, 2021 - 8:37:11 AM
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74965 posts since 5/9/2007

Bill Keith's Melodic Banjo
Bill Knopf's Fiddle Tunes for Banjo
Butch Robbins tabs
After a good foundation you'll be able to "melodicize" anything you hear.

Sep 11, 2021 - 3:31:08 PM
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74965 posts since 5/9/2007

I enjoy playing made up melodics to tunes I've never heard before in the spur of the moment.

Sep 18, 2021 - 7:48:05 AM
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Leigh

USA

496 posts since 7/13/2005

Hi, Jesse. I found Mike Hedding’s intro extremely helpful. Mike shows detailed info. Kudos to Mike! Here’s the link.

youtube.com/watch?v=YupFhi-x05...ure=share

Sep 28, 2021 - 12:05 AM
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666 posts since 6/8/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Jbanjo056

Thank you guys! I've heard a lot of great things about Melodic Banjo by Tony, so I just ordered it. I'll look at the Alan Munde books as well. I was hoping to find something that gave me the raw "tools" like scales and such, instead of just song transcriptions, so I'll give mel bay a look as well.


jbanjo056,

Raw "tools" are a good thing!

Two Mel Bay books:

The Key To Five String Banjo 

Straight Ahead Jazz For Banjo

I am adding new content every week on my newly revamped website.

https://patcloud.com

Cheers!

Pat Cloud

Sep 29, 2021 - 8:26:27 AM

RBToo

USA

14 posts since 9/25/2004

If you can find it, there’s a book of Carl Jackson transcriptions full of very cool melodic stuff.

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