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Sep 11, 2021 - 3:41:43 AM

16 posts since 7/29/2021

A friend of mine and couple of His friends met Billy Gibbons just a few years ago at a big car event. Went up to his bus and hung out a little while and Gibbons never put down his guitar.
BTW, the friend of a friend sold Gibbons a rat rod that night for a video.

Sep 15, 2021 - 7:42:10 AM
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74951 posts since 5/9/2007

An old friend of mine used to get up 2 hours early on school days to practice his fiddle playing.He practiced 2 more hours every night after supper and homework.He practiced more hours than that on weekends and holidays.
He placed in the money at 80% of the fiddle contests he entered and has National acclaim.
I would say you can't practice too much.

Sep 15, 2021 - 7:50:21 AM

phb

Germany

2978 posts since 11/8/2010
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I'm sure my family would agree that I was practising too much if I played the banjo or the fiddle two hours before school.

Sep 15, 2021 - 1:20:05 PM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

When my wife used to complain about the amount of time I spent practicing banjo, I would ask if she would rather I spend that time hanging out in a bar.

Sep 15, 2021 - 5:43:10 PM

16 posts since 7/29/2021

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

An old friend of mine used to get up 2 hours early on school days to practice his fiddle playing.He practiced 2 more hours every night after supper and homework.He practiced more hours than that on weekends and holidays.
He placed in the money at 80% of the fiddle contests he entered and has National acclaim.
I would say you can't practice too much.


I'm learning from all of you and my own experience that your practice time greatly increases as your skill level increases. 

Sep 15, 2021 - 6:43:57 PM

907 posts since 11/7/2013

You can overdo anything. I learn the most when my mind is not cluttered. If you have a day when you can't free your mind, then give it a rest. After a day or so, you come back and it is like, "Now I got it. I was overthinking it."

Sep 15, 2021 - 6:52:37 PM
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6264 posts since 10/13/2007

quote:
Originally posted by monstertone

When my wife used to complain about the amount of time I spent practicing banjo, I would ask if she would rather I spend that time hanging out in a bar.


What did she say?winklaugh

ken

Sep 16, 2021 - 1:16:57 AM
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1 posts since 11/22/2020

When I was teaching clawhammer banjo a tip I
would give is to practice a little alot.
Skill just comes to you in time so just chill out
when practicing.
Theirs always going to be be naturals who soak
up and grasp banjo playing like a sponge but
real reward I believe is from a relaxed approach
in learning.

Sep 16, 2021 - 7:51:15 AM

74951 posts since 5/9/2007

People learn in various ways.Some need a lot out of a teacher while others just need a push in the right direction.
Immersion is extremely strong as in growing up in a home with talented musical parents who played piano,steel guitar,banjo,guitar and anything with strings on it and sung heartfelt tenor.
The fiddler I spoke of had an uncle who was a respected fiddler in his own right and would tap his bow on his young nephew's head while he played to help him keep the time right.
Living it adds up to many hours per week for years.

Immersion can sometimes be quite physical.

Edited by - steve davis on 09/16/2021 07:52:15

Sep 16, 2021 - 8:52:54 AM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by From Greylock to Bean Blossom
quote:
Originally posted by monstertone

When my wife used to complain about the amount of time I spent practicing banjo, I would ask if she would rather I spend that time hanging out in a bar.


What did she say?winklaugh

ken


Speechless cheeky

Sep 16, 2021 - 10:03:06 AM

15 posts since 2/26/2019

Aside from injury issues and the other risks mentioned by others, there's a question of the benefits of hours and hours of practice. My understanding is that, while we need to challenge ourselves to improve, the improvement actually comes while we're away from the practice room, especially while we're sleeping. There have been number of occasions on which I practiced something for a long period of time but still could not quite nail it. When I came back the next day, it was comparatively easy to play. Also, there's research showing that we use the same parts of our brain in pretty much the same way when we visualize ourselves playing as when we actually are playing. I have started to use visualization as one way to improve my playing and to learn when playing is not feasible for one reason or another. Of course, visualization is not a substitute for actually playing. For one thing, it's not as much fun. On the other hand, it doesn't disturb my wife, who is, by the way, very supportive of my playing.

Sep 16, 2021 - 10:22:21 AM
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23 posts since 6/8/2017

I have played tuba for 50 years at a high level but when TMJ pain got to be too much I bought a guitar in 2010 and a banjo in 2015. Proper posture and playing technique are everything. Not just from a playing and practicing standpoint but it is a major factor in preventing overuse injury.

If it hurts, stop and come back to it or correct any technique issues that may be causing the pain. Sometimes you need to simply take a few days away from practicing because, like me, I get frustrated and get that feeling that I am beating my head against the wall. It's always better when you come back to it.

By the way, look up Stan Freese Tuba on YouTube. He plays great country and Bluegrass tuba plus is a great player and entertainer. He used to be the Disney Band leader.

Sep 16, 2021 - 10:30:06 AM

15 posts since 2/26/2019

Thnx for the tip re Freese. Howard Johnson played tuba with Taj Mahal, the great blues player. Johnson showed that tuba players can really swing.

Sep 16, 2021 - 11:30:36 AM
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23 posts since 6/8/2017

Tuba players swing because they are huge beer drinkers and are very unsteady on their feet!

Sep 16, 2021 - 3:18:29 PM
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74951 posts since 5/9/2007

The more you practice the stronger you get...physically and musically.
There are of course good practice routines and bad practice routines.
It's very easy to pick up bad timing problems by too much alone playing.Nobody to say 'Whoa there...you need to straighten out that measure with the extra beat in it."

I find my best practices at jams.

Sep 16, 2021 - 8:50:05 PM

HarleyQ

USA

3173 posts since 1/31/2005

Yes! you can practice too much. Give it a break and when you come back to it, it will be a lot smoother. Tension release.

Sep 17, 2021 - 5:41:07 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

20364 posts since 6/30/2015

Years ago there was a trumpet player who collected tolls on the Massachusetts Turnpike. He worked the night shift in the western part of the state where there was little traffic and played his trumpet all night long. I went by the booth once, and he kept playing as he gave me my change. Now they have automatic toll gantries, so the job of toll taker no longer exists.

Sep 18, 2021 - 6:48:16 AM

74951 posts since 5/9/2007

Some people like to practice a lot while others not so much.
Such is the real world.

Sep 18, 2021 - 8:48:50 AM
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6264 posts since 10/13/2007

Yes, you can practice too much - hence the term too much. but it has been my experience that the vast majority don't practice enough.
ken

Sep 18, 2021 - 4:47:59 PM
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74951 posts since 5/9/2007

What bad things happen if one practices too much?

Sep 18, 2021 - 6:35:59 PM

3240 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by gottadothis

As a beginner, a couple of months into this the question is:
Can a person practice too much, practice too often or practice too long in one session?
I read the post on BHO about tension and how it affects playing. Sometimes it seems if my practice goes a long time I seem to do some unexplained things with my right hand.


As far as the physical, you can overdo it... especially if not using body efficiently. There is an aspect of listen to your body. Beginners at first, using underdeveloped muscles in different way, repetition, can naturally cause some tension, stress, strain, fatigue. Some is to be expected, but careful about pushing too much. It's your body telling you to stop, and/or not quite doing something right.

---------

As far as the rest comments about too much practice, limitations, mental aspects. One consideration is how the brains reward system comes into play. Related, observation is the term or idea of "practice". 

For some might only be referring  to idea of forced disciplined/structured practice routine/exercises, focused mostly physical aspect; and often rote repetition. Can also include tension from worry about doing it right, not making mistakes (which can then translate to muscle tension). These can have low reward signals, be fatiguing and have lower duration limits.

Perhaps what others mentioned, there are other aspects considered part of practice. The conceptual, gaining understanding, thinking about and/or visualizing the physical can be part; and of course listening.  These ar less physical, some instrument doesn't have to be physically in hand.

As well, there are other ways, ideas that folks consider practice; often combining concepts/physical. Such as woodshedding or burst... more inspired and engaged from exploring, experiment, discovery (perhaps obsess); or just joy of playing. These seem involve brain giving higher reward signals...  typically are less limited or fatiguing, not paying attention to clock, time (sometimes hours) flies by.

Sep 20, 2021 - 3:32 AM

Manly

USA

1 posts since 9/4/2021

If your fingers are bloody stumps. that is a reliable sign that you are practicing too much!

Sep 20, 2021 - 6:24:36 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

20364 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Manly

If your fingers are bloody stumps. that is a reliable sign that you are practicing too much!


Yes, stop 20 minutes after this point.

Sep 20, 2021 - 10:03:34 AM

74951 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Manly

If your fingers are bloody stumps. that is a reliable sign that you are practicing too much!


If you practice every day your fingers get tougher.As that toughness gains strength practice time can increase  without hurting yourself.This is called a win/win situation.

Sep 21, 2021 - 5:46:35 AM
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182 posts since 10/26/2018

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

What bad things happen if one practices too much?


If one is really in the groove, practice doesn't feel like practice, and I believe strongly in putting in the time needed to play accurately and proficiently. But that only works if one is observant, objective and honest with themselves about what happens when they playing/practicing. But,what can happen if crossing into "too much?" ... 

Injury from poor technique or over use without properly building up one's tolerance. 

Practice a mistake long enough and you might have to spend the same amount of time to unlearn it. Or you've created a jazzy new variation laugh but that is far less likely. 

But if you want to play in the parking lot all night, then you'll need to practice long hours endurance. Anyone who has participated in a marathon jam session probably knows what can happen if you haven't worked on endurance, either from experience or from observing someone else have a blow out and quit before the night or weekend in over ("I'm done, my fingers/hands are shot"). 

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