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Sep 2, 2021 - 11:04:14 PM
7157 posts since 2/14/2006

Just bought a resonator from Steve Gill last week. I stained it and had a guy put several coats of spray lacquer on the outside as well as one or two coats on the inside.

How many coats is typical? I love how it sounds so far, but I want to protect it well too.




Edited by - banjo1971 on 09/02/2021 23:16:24

Sep 3, 2021 - 12:59:29 AM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

25221 posts since 6/25/2005

When I worked in Hideo Kamimoto's shop years ago, we'd shoot 3 or 4 coats. I hope your lacquer guy used nitrocellulose and not acrylic. You should ask him.

Sep 3, 2021 - 5:36:39 AM

7157 posts since 2/14/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

When I worked in Hideo Kamimoto's shop years ago, we'd shoot 3 or 4 coats. I hope your lacquer guy used nitrocellulose and not acrylic. You should ask him.


Hey Bill, yeah he used the nitrocellulose lacquer. He said he put 5 coats on the outside. 
 

thanks for your answer!!

Sep 3, 2021 - 7:17:38 AM

12278 posts since 6/2/2008

That looks nice. Appears to be some shrinkage into the pores, so maybe you could go a few more coats to get a level surface, unless this is the look you want. Maybe your guy didn't use any sealer.

I've read of a "3, 3, 3" approach to spraying lacquer:  3 passes per coat, 3 coats per day, 3 days of spraying.

I'm sure your resonator is protected at this point.  What you do from here depends on how you want it to look.

Sep 3, 2021 - 11:56:58 AM
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Players Union Member

TLG

USA

1597 posts since 10/11/2004

Shoot 3 coats on let dry , sand off 2, repeat to it's build up to your satisfaction
or in combination 3-3-3

Sep 3, 2021 - 3:53:47 PM

rmcdow

USA

1011 posts since 11/8/2014

How many coats you would put on is dependent on the grain and how the wood soaks up the lacquer. I worked with a man who was brilliant when it came to lacquer and other coatings. He would typically put 20 - 30 coats of lacquer on, sanding between each coat. The depth effect of the lacquer was amazing. After a couple of years, he started using catalyzed polyester for the base coat, then three to five coats of lacquer. It was pretty difficult to tell the difference in the beginning, but after a couple of years the polyester shrunk at a different rate than the lacquer and the wood, and you would notice the difference.

One thing I do that resolves some of the issues with multiple coats of spraying lacquer is that I brush on the first few coats, sanding between each coat. The buildup is faster than spraying, the lacquer can be applied in a way to soak into places in the wood that take more lacquer, and any irregularities can be sanded out. I'm not a fan of sanding sealer, as when sanding or buffing the lacquer after applying it you can run into the sanding sealer, which just makes a mess of the finish.  I use spraying for the final one to three coats, or alternatively sand to a fine grit then buff out the lacquer.

Edited by - rmcdow on 09/03/2021 15:56:27

Sep 3, 2021 - 7:01:46 PM

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

25221 posts since 6/25/2005

Using either paste wood filler or sanding sealer on open-grain woods like mahogany solves the problem of lacquer coats collapsing into the grain.

Sep 4, 2021 - 8:13:14 AM
Players Union Member

TLG

USA

1597 posts since 10/11/2004

AND, what Bill says

Sep 4, 2021 - 12:03:24 PM

rcc56

USA

3745 posts since 2/20/2016

And if your finish guy didn't use any pore filler, the finish will continue to sink into the grain of the mahogany for a long time.
Or, if he did fill it, it still needs considerable levelling.

The best way I know to handle either situation is to scuff sand it more or less level, first lightly with 320, then 400. Then let it cure for several weeks. After that, it may be necessary to scuff it once more, but only with the finer sandpaper. Then it can be re-coated, levelled, and polished.

And since Bill worked for Kamimoto, I'll have to see if he'll let me pick his brain a little about touch up work.
I believe that Kamimoto's book "Complete Guitar Repair" is still in print. I still consult it from time to time, and Frank Ford, who is one of our best repair people, considers it to be required reading for anyone who works on fretted instruments.

Edited by - rcc56 on 09/04/2021 12:20:38

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