Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

595
Banjo Lovers Online


Aug 29, 2021 - 5:20:28 PM
like this
95 posts since 10/26/2012

I'm doing a series on Youtube and TikTok where I play verses to old Trad Jazz tunes. A lot of times people don't play them, and I think they're great. This one is for Avalon. The first one I did was Harvest Moon. Al Jolson sang both verses in 1920, but I don't think I've ever heard the verse outside of that. Let me know if you know another version!

youtube.com/watch?v=QdXWX4eFvjE

Aug 29, 2021 - 11:10:58 PM

95 posts since 10/26/2012

Here are the chords attached...


Aug 30, 2021 - 2:45:48 AM

banjopaolo

Italy

1442 posts since 11/6/2008

Nice playing and Singing!
Thank you...
Is that a vegavox? Form the sixties?

Aug 30, 2021 - 4:12:27 AM
likes this

869 posts since 5/31/2004

Good going, Windy!

By 1930 or so, it became the practice to omit the verse(s) in popular song recordings, even on vocal arrangements. This practice is something that bothers some of us.

Aug 30, 2021 - 7:18:53 AM

95 posts since 10/26/2012

quote:
Originally posted by banjopaolo

Nice playing and Singing!
Thank you...
Is that a vegavox? Form the sixties?


Yes Paolo, it belonged to Lee Floyd Sr. and then Igor "The Jazz Cowboy" Glen whom I bought it off of.  I've always wanted one and it plays great!

Aug 30, 2021 - 10:35:12 AM

banjopaolo

Italy

1442 posts since 11/6/2008

great Banjo!
ther's a guy here in Italy that owns a very similar model...

Aug 30, 2021 - 11:44:12 AM

869 posts since 5/31/2004

Windy, someone who commented below your Youtube video posted a link to a porno site.

Aug 30, 2021 - 7:21:52 PM

95 posts since 10/26/2012

quote:
Originally posted by vintagetenor

Windy, someone who commented below your Youtube video posted a link to a porno site.


Thanks!  That seems to happen right when I post a new video, but usually not after that.

Aug 31, 2021 - 4:18:37 PM

sethb

USA

611 posts since 2/16/2005

quote:
Originally posted by vintagetenor

Good going, Windy!

By 1930 or so, it became the practice to omit the verse(s) in popular song recordings, even on vocal arrangements. This practice is something that bothers some of us.


Agreed!  I think it was Bobby Short who said that "a song without the verse is like a house without a front porch."  I've also found that the verses for many songs do a great job of setting up the lyrics in the chorus.  The song "Heartaches" is a good example of that, also the verses for "Whispering" and "Three Little Words."

Finally, I've found that instead of just playing the chorus of a tune two or three times, adding in at least an instrumental of the verse between the choruses provides a little musical variety, as well as lengthening the tune itself.  SETH

Aug 31, 2021 - 5:24:54 PM

869 posts since 5/31/2004

Yes, two instrumental choruses, then an instrumental verse, then a vocal chorus and ending with a chorus (or two) was the format for countless dance band arrangements in the 1920s.

Sep 1, 2021 - 5:10:02 AM

sethb

USA

611 posts since 2/16/2005

Not that there's any shortage of great songs to play, but I've found that adding in a few verse instrumentals can help cut the number of tunes needed for a set list by around 20-25%.   

Most verses are also fairly simple melodically, with pretty basic chord progressions, so it's usually not too hard to bring them up to speed quickly, even if you've never heard them before. 

I also think there's an added bonus of surprise for the audience when a vocalist adds in a long-forgotten verse; it also shows that you care enough about the song to learn and play the entire tune as it was originally written.  SETH 

Sep 1, 2021 - 5:33:32 AM

sethb

USA

611 posts since 2/16/2005

Incidentally, I think the funniest and oddest verse I've seen so far belongs to the 1948 Frank Loesser tune, "On A Slow Boat To China." 

The lyrics to the verse are: "There is no verse to this song, because I don't want to wait a moment too long, to say that . . ."  Very clever!  SETH

Edited by - sethb on 09/01/2021 05:35:07

Sep 1, 2021 - 5:49:56 AM

869 posts since 5/31/2004

Yes, a good one!

Sep 2, 2021 - 7:07:18 AM

sethb

USA

611 posts since 2/16/2005

This thread about verses got me wondering -- how did the tradition of "a verse and a chorus" get started?  Who created that format for a song, anyway?

I don't think we'll ever get a definitive answer to that question, which is probably lost in the mists of time at this point.  But my best guess is that it may go back to the Middle Ages or even further, when minstrels played to entertain the royal courts.  There probably weren't a lot of songs at that time -- and no "fake books" either -- so entertainers had to "stretch" whatever material they had in order to take up the time. So there was likely the need for lots of verses to a song. And I'm guessing the tradition just continued over the years, becoming one of those "that's the way it's done" things. But as the pace of life speeded up, songs got shorter, the verses got smaller, and eventually they simply faded from view.  Now, of course, we have songs that don't have verses at all (and some of them don't even have a recognizable chorus or melody either!).  

In the 20th century, there were still a few tunes that had multiple verses: "Auld Lang Syne" (5 verses! -- see attached lead sheet) and "The Man on the Flying Trapeze" come to mind.  Even "Avalon" had a double verse, as the lead post in this thread shows.  And then there's "I'm Waiting For Ships That Never Come In," a 1919 tearjerker that's already depressing enough, but has two additional "patter verses" that drag the tune out even further.  Here's the original sheet music: https://dspace.sunyconnect.suny.edu/bitstream/handle/1951/66615/SMUS%20885.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y  (see the next-to-the-last page for the additional lyrics).  But leave it to Bing Crosby to do the song justice anyway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubuI-KDuvU0    Boy, could that guy SING!  The song later became a country staple for folks like Eddy Arnold and Ernest Tubb.  SETH


Edited by - sethb on 09/02/2021 07:19:51

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.265625