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Aug 11, 2021 - 6:00:43 PM
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250 posts since 7/29/2011

Thank you all for the advice.
I contacted a banjo teacher today (who has a listing on this site and on the Deering site) and set up a lesson for Monday.
Owen mentioned driving 3 to 4.5 hours to take lessons so I guess maybe I'm lucky to only have to drive 40 minutes.

Aug 12, 2021 - 6:11:46 AM

banjoy

USA

9849 posts since 7/1/2006

I'm making this post to clarify my first responses to this thread way back on Page 1, where I was referring to the OP chopping people up and dropping their bodies on a deserted street. I'm sure some folks were scratching their heads over that one...

I made that post because the opening poster / troll had commented in an Off-Topic thread, out of the blue, bragging about chopping people up and dumping their bodies in Albuquerque, NM. Well, that's not the sort of comment you see everyday on a banjo forum, so I called him out in this thread, and you can see the troll's reply was to double down and describe the street he was talking about.

Anyway, that's the context behind my earlier posts here. I'm quite sure local authorities have been made aware of those online comments in a public forum...

My apologies, but I felt that clarification was in order. Online trolling is one thing, bragging about murder is a different animal entirely.

Edited by - banjoy on 08/12/2021 06:13:04

Aug 12, 2021 - 6:27:50 AM

3901 posts since 3/28/2008

quote:
Originally posted by banjoy

I'm making this post to clarify my first responses to this thread way back on Page 1, where I was referring to the OP chopping people up and dropping their bodies on a deserted street. I'm sure some folks were scratching their heads over that one...

I made that post because the opening poster / troll had commented in an Off-Topic thread, out of the blue, bragging about chopping people up and dumping their bodies in Albuquerque, NM. Well, that's not the sort of comment you see everyday on a banjo forum, so I called him out in this thread, and you can see the troll's reply was to double down and describe the street he was talking about.

Anyway, that's the context behind my earlier posts here. I'm quite sure local authorities have been made aware of those online comments in a public forum...

My apologies, but I felt that clarification was in order. Online trolling is one thing, bragging about murder is a different animal entirely.


Thanks for the explanation. The comment in question had already been deleted by the time I got to this thread, and your apparent non-sequitur did puzzle me a bit at the time.

Aug 12, 2021 - 6:31:29 AM
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chuckv97

Canada

59509 posts since 10/5/2013

I read that comment by that OP also. Said he’d chop up any criminal and feed them to the coyotes at the south end of an Albuquerque street. When he came back with a different name he said some more nasty stuff before being blocked.

Aug 12, 2021 - 9:27:09 AM

193 posts since 5/21/2020

quote:
Originally posted by banjoy

I'm making this post to clarify my first responses to this thread way back on Page 1, where I was referring to the OP chopping people up and dropping their bodies on a deserted street. I'm sure some folks were scratching their heads over that one...

I made that post because the opening poster / troll had commented in an Off-Topic thread, out of the blue, bragging about chopping people up and dumping their bodies in Albuquerque, NM. Well, that's not the sort of comment you see everyday on a banjo forum, so I called him out in this thread, and you can see the troll's reply was to double down and describe the street he was talking about.

Anyway, that's the context behind my earlier posts here. I'm quite sure local authorities have been made aware of those online comments in a public forum...

My apologies, but I felt that clarification was in order. Online trolling is one thing, bragging about murder is a different animal entirely.


No need to apologize Frank your are a long term contributor to this forum and I and I am sure many others respect your word and your actions on calling him out. I feel sure your law enforcement would be glad of his photo ID to help them investigate any alleged crimes that he or others may have been involved.

Aug 12, 2021 - 10:49:04 AM
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58231 posts since 12/14/2005

@Mary Z. Cox
Thanks for sharing the joy, with a more recent picture of a gal and a dog and a banjo.

You might want to ask around, see about how to keep the dog's ears from getting grass stains.
Looked like they were sort of dragging.
Either a harness to hold the ears up, or little doggie stilts for those legs.

Aug 19, 2021 - 7:19:46 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26391 posts since 8/3/2003

Oh, yes, there is a way to block you. Continue to try posting. Guess what? You're locked again for what 3rd time.

Give it up.

Aug 20, 2021 - 3:33:28 AM

4359 posts since 12/6/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Alex Z

"So picking banjo was the easiest thing you ever had to do."

Nope.  You can critique only what I say, not what I didn't say.  Picking the banjo is a minor skill.

Performing surgery on the heart of a 3 month old child is a major skill.  Landing a F-18 on a carrier deck at night is a major skill.  Picking the banjo is a minor skill.

A good teacher will have some humility and consideration for the students.  The energy for learning comes from the student.  The teacher waters the plant.


a good expert experienced teacher will know right away if someone is wasting money. its not always skill its attitude knowledge and allusions. the few I have tried to and  I would never think of charging anyone money.( I never advertised as a banjo teacher I only offered a basic  beginning for those who asked)),.......my reward would be to get folks to continue this unique America's only true musical form. I even had told those interested I can only teach basics its up to them to find expansive knowledge. In our area of NJ its hard to find young people who understand the BG music forms let alone phrasing needed. and unlike others who say banjo is the easiest thing you'll ever try to do are fooling themselves......I remember a short video segment where Chuck Berry was trying to show Kieth Richards a short riff....he kept trying and trying and Kieth also kept trying until you could see on Chucks face it wasn't working.....that has to tell you about something you're missing.

Aug 20, 2021 - 9:08:35 AM
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74 posts since 1/28/2017

I disagree that in person is bad. My friend that taught me to play stopped by last week to see me. With in a hour he taught me the Dillard roll and the chorus of Dooley for a break. He had watched Jim Pankey and passed it on to me. I still have to get it to speed but the basics are done. I pick it up and remember better thru a in person lesson. I have a lot of good lesson books and tab but the in person works better. The corrections when you make mistakes, the timing, and the encouragement is a game changer to me.

Aug 24, 2021 - 1:29:38 PM

2639 posts since 4/5/2006

I studied two years under Walt Beeman, an old guy who taught old school style. The only Bluegrass song I recall learning during that time was Cumberland Gap, & that was, more or less, for the up the neck pinky exercise. Were those two years a waste of money? No. I blame no one but myself. How could I tell Walt I wanted to learn BG, when I didn't know the difference between any of the banjo styles. I didn't even know CG was a BG song.
What I did learn from Walt, I was able to put to use on all things music.
One might say those two years may have been put to better use. Perhaps. That's life, roll with it. No regrets.

Aug 26, 2021 - 4:04:37 PM

5 posts since 8/25/2021

I agree that it is not worth $1.00/ minute. 1 or two ideas in 5 minutes or so is all I can absorb and then practice doing it for a few days. If you have no idea about fretted instruments, lessons is not really the place for that, search for “all music theory in 22 minutes “ or something similar

Aug 27, 2021 - 11:41:44 AM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by ben2

I agree that it is not worth $1.00/ minute. 1 or two ideas in 5 minutes or so is all I can absorb and then practice doing it for a few days. If you have no idea about fretted instruments, lessons is not really the place for that, search for “all music theory in 22 minutes “ or something similar


Sheesh, some of you guys must have short attention span disorder. Haven't any of you heard of a tape recorder, or a smart-phone, fercryinoutloud? $30 for a half hour lesson was par for the coarse way before Al Gore invented the internet. It ain't rocket science. If unable to absorb one or two ideas per lesson & pull it off by the next lesson, either your lessons are too close together, or your just not putting forth the effort.

Aug 27, 2021 - 12:16:22 PM
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110 posts since 7/22/2012

I think one distinction related to the "value-per-minute" consideration has to do with the intake of general principles. Give the right young musician 30 minutes with J.D. Crowe, Earl Scruggs, and Don Reno, in which they talk about their different approaches and play various examples, and that kid is a going to learn so much from each of them on a deep level, even if the kid doesn't remember very many specific techniques. It is kind of like "teaching a man to fish," or like learning to speak a language—30 minutes or an hour immersion with a native speaker is gold. (At least if you are going to really become fluent. Some learning happens with conscious effort and some of it seeps in subconsciously.) Again there's no one-size-fits-all, but 30 minutes sitting around with an excellent musician who can somewhat explain his (or her) approach is a sure way to learn things if you are even half interested, no doubt about it. 

Edited by - Banjfoot on 08/27/2021 12:18:17

Aug 27, 2021 - 12:25:02 PM

110 posts since 7/22/2012

This would definitely be worth $1 an hour for some. Fortunately it's free! ;]

youtube.com/watch?v=W6nqzR49eSU

Aug 27, 2021 - 12:41:23 PM
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RB3

USA

1095 posts since 4/12/2004

There is of course the old bromide that "those who can, do; those who can't, teach". What's left out of that is that it is also often the case that those who can, can't or won't teach. So, 30 minutes with the virtuoso of your choice may not be as beneficial as you might think.

Aug 27, 2021 - 1:34:02 PM
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110 posts since 7/22/2012

Definitely sometimes the case as well. Depends on the individuals. The Bill Keith video above is an example kind of like what I am talking about. He is a master musician and also has useful ways to explain some things. And if I was sitting around with him, on my own, I could ask him to show me things multiple times, to give me different or simpler examples etc. Granted some of what I am talking about is picking subtle things up, once a person can somewhat play—if a person can't play at all yet, different situation. But I definitely would pay $1 a minute for that Bill Keith video if I had to. And $2 a minute to learn some things directly from him for thirty minutes.

Edited by - Banjfoot on 08/27/2021 13:37:14

Aug 28, 2021 - 12:37:52 PM
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2639 posts since 4/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Banjfoot

Definitely sometimes the case as well. Depends on the individuals. The Bill Keith video above is an example kind of like what I am talking about. He is a master musician and also has useful ways to explain some things. And if I was sitting around with him, on my own, I could ask him to show me things multiple times, to give me different or simpler examples etc. Granted some of what I am talking about is picking subtle things up, once a person can somewhat play—if a person can't play at all yet, different situation. But I definitely would pay $1 a minute for that Bill Keith video if I had to. And $2 a minute to learn some things directly from him for thirty minutes.


Me thinks the avenue runs both ways. Regardless of the quality of material, or the manner presented, it is all for naught, if the horse is unwilling to drink.

Aug 29, 2021 - 3:52:28 AM
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4359 posts since 12/6/2009
Online Now

"I taught him all I know and he's still stupid.

Aug 29, 2021 - 4:19:07 PM

5 posts since 8/25/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Banjfoot

This would definitely be worth $1 an hour for some. Fortunately it's free! ;]

youtube.com/watch?v=W6nqzR49eSU


I agree $1.00. Per hour is reasonable. There are online lessons on YouTube from Eli Gilbert or something like that, and most of the lessons are 5 min or so. Even $5 for a simple lesson would be cool. My experience is way different than that. Just like an old lady teaching piano, an old fart teaching banjo is no better

Aug 29, 2021 - 4:20:45 PM
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5 posts since 8/25/2021

quote:
Originally posted by overhere
quote:
Originally posted by Alex Z

"So picking banjo was the easiest thing you ever had to do."

Nope.  You can critique only what I say, not what I didn't say.  Picking the banjo is a minor skill.

Performing surgery on the heart of a 3 month old child is a major skill.  Landing a F-18 on a carrier deck at night is a major skill.  Picking the banjo is a minor skill.

A good teacher will have some humility and consideration for the students.  The energy for learning comes from the student.  The teacher waters the plant.


a good expert experienced teacher will know right away if someone is wasting money. its not always skill its attitude knowledge and allusions. the few I have tried to and  I would never think of charging anyone money.( I never advertised as a banjo teacher I only offered a basic  beginning for those who asked)),.......my reward would be to get folks to continue this unique America's only true musical form. I even had told those interested I can only teach basics its up to them to find expansive knowledge. In our area of NJ its hard to find young people who understand the BG music forms let alone phrasing needed. and unlike others who say banjo is the easiest thing you'll ever try to do are fooling themselves......I remember a short video segment where Chuck Berry was trying to show Kieth Richards a short riff....he kept trying and trying and Kieth also kept trying until you could see on Chucks face it wasn't working.....that has to tell you about something you're missing.


As a person able to fly any aircraft made, playing a string instrument is a far more difficult thing to . I can teach a person land a Cessna 150 or a piper tomahawk in 2 hours. Learning a fast 5-3-1 roll takes a genius a few days at least

Edited by - ben2 on 08/29/2021 16:24:47

Sep 4, 2021 - 3:40:13 PM
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12268 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by cobra1

I disagree that in person is bad. My friend that taught me to play stopped by last week to see me. With in a hour he taught me the Dillard roll and the chorus of Dooley for a break. 


There's banjo gold in that roll -- also known as the Osborne Roll. Maybe Doug got it from Sonny.

Not going to tab it out here, but the roll we're talking about --  1-2-1-5 / M-I-M-T --  can be used for all sorts of multi-measure ascending and descending phrases.  Once referred to in Banjo Newsletter as uphill and downhill Dillards.

What you do is combine that picking pattern with the 2-string partial chord shapes of a harmonized scale. What's that? If you build a triad on every note of a particular key's scale using only notes from that scale, you get the "diatonic" chords for that key. Playing them in order gives you the harmonized scale.

In the key of G, that would be:  G - Am - Bm - C - D - Em - F#dim

Every major key follows the same pattern of Major, minor and diminished. I'll leave you to figure out the harmonized scale for other keys.

Back to the lesson at hand. Start with the two-note partial G chord at 8th and 9th frets. Now, picking the Dillard roll, move up the neck, changing to the two-string partials of the chords I spelled out above.  After you've done that for a while, start at the same 8/9 G chord and go down the G Major scale.

Then start at the 2-note partial G at 12th fret, going up or down. Or start with 1st and 2nd strings fretted at 10th fret, treating it as D7 and try to find a five-to-one (V-I) pattern. Or start anywhere, move up or down to the next chord shape that makes sense and hear what you find.

The sounds are very melodic without being actual melodic style.

Doug uses it a lot in Banjoina on The Banjo Album.

If someone showed this to me in person, I'd think it was valuable.

Have fun.

Sep 7, 2021 - 8:55:46 PM
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639 posts since 5/29/2009

I once had a banjo student that spent most of the year on a fishing boat and got most of his lessons online. He had been trying to figure out how to do a hammer on for about 3 months and still couldn’t get it. After 5 minutes with me he was doing great and I’m no wizard teacher. It was just that he needed a live teacher. I learned a big lesson.

Sep 8, 2021 - 8:46:30 AM

Owen

Canada

9545 posts since 6/5/2011

.... ^^ only three months??  In my book he might not be a prodigy, but surely he's "gifted."  wink

Sep 8, 2021 - 9:36:21 PM
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24 posts since 11/23/2019

Wow!!! How can learning from someone more talented then you are be a waste of time? My father is 75 . He plays piano, guitar, and sings opera. He is still taking lessons after 50 plus years.

Sep 8, 2021 - 10:12:23 PM
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58231 posts since 12/14/2005

Good heavens!
Are we still arguing about giving away our time?

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