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Jul 28, 2021 - 6:00:37 PM

8997 posts since 8/28/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree
quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie
quote:

Loud music is usually flawed in some way, and they are trying to hide the flaws.


That's a rather insulting statement, and a ridiculous generalization. 


That's why I said usually. Sometimes it's just a bad sound engineer.


"Usually" is a pretty inclusive term and implies that something is "typical."  In my opinion "usually" flawed" is not typical of loud music, and in my mind, that word still makes the statement a generaliztion. "Sometimes" might have been a more appropriate word choice.

Jul 29, 2021 - 4:45:55 AM

4365 posts since 12/6/2009

Why is it when they take a traditional music form identified by its original creative form as a distinct genre all to its own? Then change it distort it make it something completely different and then call it....”progressive” when it ain’t even close to what it pretends to be.... or what it was from the first place...and then on top of it blame seniors for not excepting it as such????????

Jul 29, 2021 - 5:41:19 AM
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3600 posts since 9/12/2016

If I was 20 I would be right there with them, .Young pretty girls go for , movers and shakers ,young boys have a hankering for young pretty girls. Later on they might dig in and become complete musicians. In between naps

Aug 1, 2021 - 12:56:55 PM

Enfield1858

England

128 posts since 8/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree

microsoftnewskids.com/en-us/ki...=msedgntp Reasons why many People can't accept Modern Music and Progressive Playing styles of any Genre.


The conclusions of that article seem a bit sweeping, to me.  When I started playing in a British brass band (baritone horn) at the age of 68, that was in many ways taking me back to my formative years. When I was aged 5 - 12, I used to listen to the local Salvation Army band, who played around our neighbourhood on Sunday mornings - the sheer enthusiasm of their playing really grabbed me, and left a lifelong impression.

Insert decades of listening to rock music and R & B - from the Beatles, Stones, Clapton, Steely Dan, Dire Straits, Roxy Music, etc . . .

Until I was 73, 'banjo music' to me was 'Foggy Mountain Breakdown' and 'Orange Blossom Special' being hammered out at machine gun speed, and left me stone cold. Come to that, it still does. But when the brass band was forced to shut down because of lockdown, I started looking around for something else to get into, and discovered old time, what I think of as mountain music - the sort that makes me picture some bloke sitting on his porch in the Appalachians, playing his banjo to his redbone hound! And I was totally hooked . . .

Who says an old dog can't get a taste for completely different music?

With best regards,
Jack

Aug 1, 2021 - 3:00:57 PM
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3600 posts since 9/12/2016

Those marches from the 1890s etc, sound really good on the 5 imo.a very energizing music .
bing.com/videos/search?q=march...RM=HDRSC3

Aug 21, 2021 - 5:45:36 AM

76 posts since 2/14/2021

I've read all the entries in the discussion and if my entry is off subject - blame me. Full disclosure: I'm an old guy. I've played and listened to acoustic folk, Old Time and Bluegrass all my adult life and that's my preference. However, that's not what I want to comment on. I want to issue a plea to bands or solo acts of any genre providing background music in eating and drinking establishments (exclude concerts or performances). Turn your sound down so people can talk!!! You're background music. Be aware that usually people are there to socialize with each other NOT to hear your music no matter how great it is. At one gig I did for several years, we set up sound equipment but did not turn it on. No one was the wiser. Not always the answer for sure but consider the listening audience first and adjust your sound level accordingly.

Aug 21, 2021 - 6:08:48 AM

8997 posts since 8/28/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by Professor Jive

I've read all the entries in the discussion and if my entry is off subject - blame me. Full disclosure: I'm an old guy. I've played and listened to acoustic folk, Old Time and Bluegrass all my adult life and that's my preference. However, that's not what I want to comment on. I want to issue a plea to bands or solo acts of any genre providing background music in eating and drinking establishments (exclude concerts or performances). Turn your sound down so people can talk!!! You're background music. Be aware that usually people are there to socialize with each other NOT to hear your music no matter how great it is. At one gig I did for several years, we set up sound equipment but did not turn it on. No one was the wiser. Not always the answer for sure but consider the listening audience first and adjust your sound level accordingly.


There are times when I'd rather hear loud background music than that crap one usually hears in the background at eating establishments.  If the food gives me botulism and I die on the spot, I certainly don't wish to do it to the bland sounds of a Neil Diamond tune played on violins.

Aug 21, 2021 - 10:44:51 AM

76 posts since 2/14/2021

OK!

Aug 21, 2021 - 10:56:55 AM

3600 posts since 9/12/2016

I remember a quote from years ago--''Music with a meal is an insult to both the musician and the cook"

the guy making music probably does not know how loud it is off stage,sad but true on a high per centage

Edited by - Tractor1 on 08/21/2021 10:58:46

Aug 21, 2021 - 6:02:10 PM

lanemb

USA

214 posts since 3/11/2018

I never really understood loud. We were out to dinner recently with a really good band playing. Unfortunately it was so loud you couldn’t enjoy it or your food. I guess there is a place for it I just haven’t found it yet.

Aug 22, 2021 - 6:57:18 AM

8997 posts since 8/28/2013
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The place for music in a restaurant is obvious to me. Too many times, it's needed to drown out the inane and boring conversation of inlaws, the obnoxious politics of co-workers, or the insipid chattering of a bad date.

Aug 24, 2021 - 3:33:23 AM

4365 posts since 12/6/2009

The misconception is, not like or dislike “new” music it’s that some who don’t know any better call new music what it aint because they can’t play the old true music or know the difference but still need the label to sell their new stuff...ie ---BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL TODAY... Taylor Swift, Mumford and Son.....Billy Strings.....Alfred E Newman.....etc etc

Aug 25, 2021 - 6:52:41 AM

187 posts since 10/26/2018

As much as I like a good pop song, much of what is pop these days come from literally 4 or 5 song writers who may or may not be from Sweden. And pop country, save for the vocal tones, is basically the same - pop rock. (remember Pop Rock candy?) yet if one is willing to try, good music can be found on the radio between the blegh. With providers like Spotify, it's easier to discover new music because the algorithms often make decent suggestions. Spotify opened the door for me to deep cuts from the rich and varied world of 70s R&B. So despite not listening to what I listened to on the radio in my younger days, I still prefer the production values of that era - live musicians, physical instruments and true voices - over sequenced electronic sounds that are manipulated in a somewhat musical fashion.

That said, there are definitely current pop musicians who can do it without the aide of technology. The pure voice of Dua Lipa (in an small ensemble or acoustic setting, not the over produced commercial releases) lights up the pleasure center of my brain.

Aug 25, 2021 - 6:56:01 PM

3243 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Professor Jive

I've read all the entries in the discussion and if my entry is off subject - blame me. Full disclosure: I'm an old guy. I've played and listened to acoustic folk, Old Time and Bluegrass all my adult life and that's my preference. However, that's not what I want to comment on. I want to issue a plea to bands or solo acts of any genre providing background music in eating and drinking establishments (exclude concerts or performances). Turn your sound down so people can talk!!! You're background music. Be aware that usually people are there to socialize with each other NOT to hear your music no matter how great it is. At one gig I did for several years, we set up sound equipment but did not turn it on. No one was the wiser. Not always the answer for sure but consider the listening audience first and adjust your sound level accordingly.


It's really the call of the venue as  to how loud... and feedback should be directed to them.

I am not a fan of overly loud venues, and have played gigs just acoustically without sound reinforcement, and it can work fine for that venue. But acknowledge that atmosphere is not always what the venue wants, thinks works for their target customers trying to attract, and we need to pump it up a bit.

Keep in mind that one role of music (esp background music) is often to create sense of excitement and energy if not  bit of party atmosphere. The venue understands how volume psychologically plays a part to feel of energy... that is customers associate that volume with energy of the place. (not the only part, type of music, timbre and tempo play role). Been to places where the goal of lively music is just too quiet. So the music has to reach a certain critical level/balance to achieve the right feel (not be drowned out by din). But that would vary on the actual feel and atmosphere the venue think appropriate (along with type of music). Perhaps they want gentle quiet background music so it's inviting to folks who want discuss what ever deep conversation they have about weather, books, TV shows, or latest gossip. On the other hand, might find that venue a little sedate, not looking for quiet little place... and are looking for a little more lively, exciting atmosphere.  

One example comes to mind... is a popular Mexican restaurant, even with out SR... has a Mariachi band playing, those horns esp can be somewhat loud and hard to talk over... but it's part of the atmosphere.

FWIW, many might not think of most live old-time and bluegrass as quiet, nor good fit for sedate atmosphere, just faint in the background.

I agree though that some designated sound engineers (or the musician) by default perhaps might overly push "louder is better" more than they need to. As start to bump louder to get over the din, the louder folks talk creating more din; harder for musicians to able to hear, and at some point start to introduce other issues with sound in a room, not only GBF, but dealing with balance and mid-tone mud and/or harshness.

Aug 26, 2021 - 11:23:56 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

20494 posts since 6/30/2015
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The restaurant wouldn't pay a musician if the musician wasn't bringing in customers. Same thing if they have a close up magician. There are plenty of restaurants without musicians, and they are usually much less crowded. Go there if you don't like music with your meal.

Aug 26, 2021 - 2:38:26 PM

3243 posts since 10/17/2009

But, Dave, nobody wants to go to those restaurants, besides too loud, they are too crowded.wink

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