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Jul 27, 2021 - 11:39:17 AM
1525 posts since 1/28/2013

microsoftnewskids.com/en-us/ki...=msedgntp Reasons why many People can't accept Modern Music and Progressive Playing styles of any Genre.

Jul 27, 2021 - 12:03:25 PM
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673 posts since 8/14/2018

I am old, so I drive the kids off my lawn by cranking the John Zorn and Sun Ra records.

Jul 27, 2021 - 12:23:28 PM

3566 posts since 9/12/2016

I must be young for my age, I can tell chords and rhythm's better than ever. Good music from any player is still good , I never look to see their age. Being young does not erase bad taste in the noise we make, . However our taste are all different. We have a right for our taste ,but the loudness has to be a more communal agreement if we want to be at peace on this planet.
Old people are not some tone deaf problem.A lot of folks did not have systems that were really that clear  a few decades back. Our slowdowners were turntables .

progressive is not only a youngsters domain

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/27/2021 12:39:51

Jul 27, 2021 - 2:06:27 PM
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325 posts since 9/20/2007

Progressive is one thing, but I tend to enjoy music with taste. Just because one can rattle off nearly impossible licks does not make for good tasteful music.

Jul 27, 2021 - 2:08:40 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26297 posts since 8/3/2003

I agree with Tom:

I like different genres of music. I can distinguish chords and chord changes and rhythm very easily. What I don't like is LOUD music. Seems like a lot of bands think it's necessary to turn up the volume where people can't hear one another or talk where it can be heard. I guess I have sensitive ears because loud music actually hurts my ears. That kind of music, regardless of the genre, is, to me, NOISE, not music. It has nothing to do with age. I've felt that way since I was in my teens.

Jul 27, 2021 - 2:27:18 PM
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8893 posts since 8/28/2013

Like most everything, this article is a generalization and certainly doesn't include all older people. Although some folks probably do focus on what they grew up with instead of finding pleasure in new forms, harmonies, rhythms, and sonorities, there are those who keep an open mind (or ear) and not only can appreciate the new, but learn it and learn from it.

Of course, there are tasteless tunes from every generation. One must be careful distaste for one or two tunes is not confused with hating everything modern, and I think tha confusion i's where too many people get the wrong idea about older people's musical preferences.

Jul 27, 2021 - 3:02:01 PM
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Alex Z

USA

4479 posts since 12/7/2006

quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree

microsoftnewskids.com/en-us/ki...=msedgntp Reasons why many People can't accept Modern Music and Progressive Playing styles of any Genre.


The author of the article is pretty clear about what his conclusions are:  

  "But I believe there are some simpler reasons for older people’s aversion to newer music. One of the most researched laws of social psychology is something called the “mere exposure effect.” In a nutshell, it means that the more we’re exposed to something, the more we tend to like it. "

    "For many people over 30, job and family obligations increase, so there’s less time to spend discovering new music. Instead, many will simply listen to old, familiar favorites from that period of their lives when they had more free time."

This doesn't seem to be related to modern music and playing styles, but rather with exposure -- if you don't listen enough to "progressive playing styles," it is less likely that  you will like it, and that many listen to music less when they are older compared to when they were in high school.  Thus, not enough exposure to become familiar with new styles.

Happens all the time in bluegrass.  There are plenty of players who consider anything after 1955 (that's 65 years ago) to be avant garde.  Bill Keith in 1960 was not playing "real" banjo music.  I recall one session where a small group of us were playing Blackberry Blossom, with a fiddler, and I took a banjo break.  After the tune was over, some knucklehead bystander mumbled something about "now let's get back to regular bluegrass."

Maybe the author is wrong -- maybe 65 years of something different is still not enough to expand one's musical horizon. smiley

Jul 27, 2021 - 3:18:20 PM
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beegee

USA

22461 posts since 7/6/2005

I listen to classical, big band, jazz, old country, bluegrass, classic rock.

Basically, I like music with a recognizable melody, meaningful lyrics(good poetry or a story line), dynamics, solid rhythm, no profanity

I don't like mind-numbing noise, crashing beats, repetitive chanting of mindless lyrics. I don't care whose music it is.

Edited by - beegee on 07/27/2021 15:25:52

Jul 27, 2021 - 5:25:33 PM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

I agree with Tom:

I like different genres of music. I can distinguish chords and chord changes and rhythm very easily. What I don't like is LOUD music. Seems like a lot of bands think it's necessary to turn up the volume where people can't hear one another or talk where it can be heard. I guess I have sensitive ears because loud music actually hurts my ears. That kind of music, regardless of the genre, is, to me, NOISE, not music. It has nothing to do with age. I've felt that way since I was in my teens.


Loud music is usually flawed in some way, and they are trying to hide the flaws.

Jul 27, 2021 - 5:31:30 PM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Alex Z
quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree

microsoftnewskids.com/en-us/ki...=msedgntp Reasons why many People can't accept Modern Music and Progressive Playing styles of any Genre.


The author of the article is pretty clear about what his conclusions are:  

  "But I believe there are some simpler reasons for older people’s aversion to newer music. One of the most researched laws of social psychology is something called the “mere exposure effect.” In a nutshell, it means that the more we’re exposed to something, the more we tend to like it. "

    "For many people over 30, job and family obligations increase, so there’s less time to spend discovering new music. Instead, many will simply listen to old, familiar favorites from that period of their lives when they had more free time."

This doesn't seem to be related to modern music and playing styles, but rather with exposure -- if you don't listen enough to "progressive playing styles," it is less likely that  you will like it, and that many listen to music less when they are older compared to when they were in high school.  Thus, not enough exposure to become familiar with new styles.

Happens all the time in bluegrass.  There are plenty of players who consider anything after 1955 (that's 65 years ago) to be avant garde.  Bill Keith in 1960 was not playing "real" banjo music.  I recall one session where a small group of us were playing Blackberry Blossom, with a fiddler, and I took a banjo break.  After the tune was over, some knucklehead bystander mumbled something about "now let's get back to regular bluegrass."

Maybe the author is wrong -- maybe 65 years of something different is still not enough to expand one's musical horizon. smiley


I wonder what they would think about Jens Kruger if they did'nt like Bill Keith.

Jul 27, 2021 - 5:34:15 PM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by beegee

I listen to classical, big band, jazz, old country, bluegrass, classic rock.

Basically, I like music with a recognizable melody, meaningful lyrics(good poetry or a story line), dynamics, solid rhythm, no profanity

I don't like mind-numbing noise, crashing beats, repetitive chanting of mindless lyrics. I don't care whose music it is.


If it's sounds good I don't care what the arrangement is, playing style, instruments used, moderate or slow, or when it was recorded etc.  

Jul 27, 2021 - 5:47:56 PM
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banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11457 posts since 2/22/2007
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Old Time Music was very new to me when I discovered it in my mid-50s, and took up banjo.

Jul 27, 2021 - 6:03:01 PM
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360 posts since 11/29/2012

I think John Zorn had a little banjo on his tribute to Ennio Morricone, "The Big Gundown". I WISH Sun Ra had used banjo, but nope. Good music is good music no matter the genre. You know it's good when the heart's in it. You can always tell when someone's faking it. Since I was 14 and discovered college radio and John Peel's BBC show I've searched for new music, old and young, and the connections going as far back in time as history allows. Good topic!

Edited by - 35planar on 07/27/2021 18:03:55

Jul 27, 2021 - 6:19:50 PM

Bill H

USA

1693 posts since 11/7/2010

I agree completely with this article. I remember my first record at age five was a Smiley Burnette record I played on my Howdy Doody phonograph. I have been a fan of "Fifteen Miles on the Erie Canal since that time. When my fifth grade teacher played a Weavers album for our class, I was forever hooked on folk music. Bluegrass, old time and all thing banjo were a natural progression from that. While I love jazz and classical in performance, I don't listen much.

Jul 27, 2021 - 6:34:13 PM

3566 posts since 9/12/2016

I don't put Jens above Bill Keith I am more in sync will Bill's taste and the music he brought forth . I am not necessarily riding some other judge's wagon .

Blaming not having one's music  become somebody's ''go to'' sounds might have to do with ''said'' music ,There  IS the chance that----blaming it on old folks ears and those folks raising a family might just be a rationalization to ease the pain of some questionable playing.

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/27/2021 18:43:48

Jul 27, 2021 - 8:56:19 PM

3850 posts since 3/28/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Alex Z
 There are plenty of players who consider anything after 1955 (that's 65 years ago) to be avant garde.  Bill Keith in 1960 was not playing "real" banjo music.

I believe the technical term is "Yankee double-picking."

;^)

Jul 28, 2021 - 6:03:02 AM

8893 posts since 8/28/2013

quote:

Loud music is usually flawed in some way, and they are trying to hide the flaws.


That's a rather insulting statement, and a ridiculous generalization. 

Jul 28, 2021 - 6:34:20 AM

1928 posts since 2/4/2013

quote:
Originally posted by banjo bill-e

Old Time Music was very new to me when I discovered it in my mid-50s, and took up banjo.


Exactly the same for me (perhaps I was 49!). I was familar with some English and Irish folk music but banjos and folk/old time expanded my horizons. And into Americana (Gillian Welch, Sarah Jarosz, Darlingside) if Americana is really a thing.

Jul 28, 2021 - 6:47:18 AM

1928 posts since 2/4/2013

I still like most of the stuff I liked in the seventies including loud music with crashing rhythms and perhaps mindless chanting of lyrics. I did move on from prog and classic rock to punk and new wave, synth pop, a myriad of electronica (trance, trip hop techno etc.) and banjo based folk and bands in a variety of genres, such as Arcade Fire, but also stayed with most of the stuff I liked. Of course it's the internet that did it. Explore old stuff more, explore new stuff. I think without the internet I might have bought a guitar banjo as I did but would I have moved onto a five string or heard clawhammer. Doubtful.

Jul 28, 2021 - 6:48:02 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26297 posts since 8/3/2003

quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree
quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

I agree with Tom:

I like different genres of music. I can distinguish chords and chord changes and rhythm very easily. What I don't like is LOUD music. Seems like a lot of bands think it's necessary to turn up the volume where people can't hear one another or talk where it can be heard. I guess I have sensitive ears because loud music actually hurts my ears. That kind of music, regardless of the genre, is, to me, NOISE, not music. It has nothing to do with age. I've felt that way since I was in my teens.


Loud music is usually flawed in some way, and they are trying to hide the flaws.


Maybe sometimes that's true, but not always.

I remember years ago we traveled over 200 miles to hear one band and one banjo player that I thought was fantastic.  When they got on stage, they cranked the amps up so loud that they actually lost the first 5 rows of listeners.      Were they as fantastic as I had hoped?  I have no idea because the music was so loud it hurt my ears.  I was never so disappointed in a band.    From then on I just listened to their CDs, never went to another festival where they had a gig.  Their music on CDs was, and still is, great and you and you can turn the sound up or down as you wish.

Jul 28, 2021 - 9:50:40 AM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

Same thing happened to me at a New Years Eve Old Crow Medicine Show Concert at the Ryman Auditorium. It was too loud, they sounded like some Run of the Mill Garage Band, not like their CD's. Pokey Lafarge opened for them and he was better than they were. I have walked out of other Concerts over the years because it was too loud. Harmonies were distorted, one instrument or the drums over powered the rest of the band, vocals too loud, etc. Ironically the ones I walked out of were more Progressive Bluegrass, Country and Country Rock bands, rather than Classic Rock bands of the past.

Jul 28, 2021 - 9:57:49 AM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Bill H

I agree completely with this article. I remember my first record at age five was a Smiley Burnette record I played on my Howdy Doody phonograph. I have been a fan of "Fifteen Miles on the Erie Canal since that time. When my fifth grade teacher played a Weavers album for our class, I was forever hooked on folk music. Bluegrass, old time and all thing banjo were a natural progression from that. While I love jazz and classical in performance, I don't listen much.


https://youtu.be/SDvYBCZwMIk Bruce Springsteen with a great totally off the chart version of 15 miles on the Erie Canal. I play it on the 5 string and 4 string.

Jul 28, 2021 - 9:58:03 AM

3566 posts since 9/12/2016

sometimes some lightduty earplugs do the trick,if that ain't too progressive of an action

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/28/2021 10:00:24

Jul 28, 2021 - 10:18:06 AM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

Yeah, I have used ear plugs many times. When I saw OCMS 2 years ago in D.C. I had earplugs. I also had ear plugs 3 months ago when I saw Steeldrivers, but I was way up front.

Jul 28, 2021 - 10:19:35 AM

1525 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie
quote:

Loud music is usually flawed in some way, and they are trying to hide the flaws.


That's a rather insulting statement, and a ridiculous generalization. 


That's why I said usually. Sometimes it's just a bad sound engineer.

Jul 28, 2021 - 11:24:24 AM
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3566 posts since 9/12/2016

I have a knack for bad sound engineering

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