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Jul 24, 2021 - 8:28:09 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

Our folk group made our own longneck out of a 2 x 4. White pine
Our frets were HO railroad track with HO spikes, too
We measured and cut the fret slots by hand. We did the math.
The actual whittling was pocket knife

Someone in this thread has whittled a Zebra wood neck recently

You kind of jumped from log to frets
There are ways to keep frets in

What headstock shape?


Helix,

What do you mean by the headstock shape? Do you mean the top of the neck where the pegs would be held?

Its great to hear that you made your own long-neck! Did it work out and perform well? Also, another question, what would HO railroad frets look like? Mine look like these: 

Let me know if you see the photo.

Jul 24, 2021 - 8:33:29 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Don Smith1959
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

Thanks for the advice yes. I will keep that in mind. Ken LeVan reminded me of the same thing: that white pine may twist or turn with time. While I know it may not be the smartest thing to do, I really am doing this for the experience at this point, so I can learn how to do it, and what to not do/to do in the future if I do build another longneck at some point. Have you worked with White Pine in the past? I have seen 200 year old boards of white pine freshly cut way back, and many do not seem all that warped.


the person Helix was referring to hand carving a neck was me I literally sat in my recliner and hand carved everything until I had it like I wanted it and you would not believe what I used to carve it some vary small carving chisels i purchased at harbor freight for like $10 where there is a will there is a way 

I am currently building a Mountain Dulcimer for my wife and I am having to use Japanese pull saws to cut a 1/8 inch slice from the thickness of a 9 inch wide board for the top,sides and bottom pieces, because i do not have a band saw that is big enough to rip a 9 inch wide board just because i do not want to plane it down to 1/8 inch thick and waste all that wood

I just hate to see someone waist all that time hand carving something and then hear how it twisted,warped  and split

 


Hi Don,

Wow, carving that neck must have been fun! Do you know if you can recommend to me some chisels to buy? My family always needs some wood work to be done, so probably a good thing to have them around the house. 

Do you think a japanese wood saw would be helpful in this project?

Anyway, I hope that the pine would hold, but if it does spilt, its alright smiley. If it does not work, maybe I will try to make a hardwood neck in the future, if I can get a hold of some. 

Jul 24, 2021 - 8:49:10 AM
likes this

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by RBuddy

Are you using a fret slotting saw to cut the fret slots? In the picture, they look kind of wide and that may be part of the problem getting the frets to say put. Fret saws are made to cut the right width of slot.

Some guitar builders cut the fret slots wider on purpose and then glue the frets in with epoxy, clamping each fret as they go until the glue sets.

But being that white pine is so soft, even clamping in frets could easily be overdone by compressing the wood too ending up in uneven fret heights.

Have fun but don't get discouraged if your first banjo project doesn't work out, we all started somewhere just like you are.


No, I am not using a special saw really. In those photos, I show a fret cut with one of my hand-saws, which I thought would do the trick. However, after I realized they were too thick for the metal frets, I had no idea on what to do next. 

However, I was able to fix my scroll saw (old and small one), and I found out that a specific saw I used in the machine created nearly a perfect fit for my metal frets! I proceeded to cut the frets out according to the template, and as of now, I have laid about 18 metal frets into the neck, most of them seem to be very sturdy and not loose. I also learned that if I slightly bend the frets with a pair of pliers, it makes them fit more sturdy into the white pine neck. I used a spare piece of white pine I cut to wham the frets into the neck.

Here are new photos for everyone, taken today:


Jul 24, 2021 - 8:54:47 AM

58627 posts since 12/14/2005

The photo looks like "real" fretwire from a musical supply place.
Model railroad track looks like a tiny I-beam.

ONE way to hold 'em in is instant GEL glue, not the thin, runny kind.

Wear tight plastic gloves, and don't run glue into more than 3 slots at a time, or it will be dry before you get to the fourth one.

Jul 24, 2021 - 9:07:46 AM

Enfield1858

England

133 posts since 8/1/2020

quote:
 

Yep, having a great time! It probably wont be playable for long, but it has been fun to imagine the design and make it.


@BeeEnvironment - that's the spirit!  I've only been playing banjo a few months - with several months out of that when I couldn't visit my teacher for lessons.  Even so, when I think back to how hard it was at the start, to play a simple open string exercise at any more than a snail's pace, as compared to how easy the same exercise feels now when I'm warming up, I'm certain your skills will already have come a long way, and your next build will show it.

Hang in there, mate! And best regards,
Jack

Edited by - Enfield1858 on 07/24/2021 09:08:32

Jul 24, 2021 - 9:35:33 AM
likes this

1661 posts since 7/2/2007

When I mentioned "we all started somewhere" I hoped you were a little bit further along on the woodworking curve than your pics demonstrate.

I think you would serve your ambitions much better by trying to hone your woodworking skills some more before trying to make a stringed instrument.

Certain basic things like being able to make a piece of wood flat and straight are essential to making an instrument.

It can be done with a pocket knife if you spend enough time on it but it is a lot easier with some tools.

I'd start out by taking a piece of your pine tree and just make a surface flat and straight. Test it out by laying the flat section on a table or counter top and making sure there are no gaps between your pine and the flat surface.

Once you've mastered that, consider making a fretless banjo and moving up from there.

I know you've put a lot of time and effort into your neck because it takes time to get where you are with a pocket knife. I applaud you for your major effort and courage to try! But it looks like time to start over with what you've learned so far.

Youtube is your friend, watch videos of guitar and banjo makers and see how it's done.

Maybe consider spending some time looking for odd jobs to make some money for tools or in trade for some tools.

Remember, practice makes perfect.

Good luck!

Jul 24, 2021 - 12:40:51 PM
like this
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

6217 posts since 8/19/2012

I have been reading this thread and have some thoughts.
1. you need tools. Suggest you start checking craigslist and your local newspaper for farm auctions. I have picked up any number of tools that are a bit corroded and rusty but with a little work with some emory paper and a wire brush then a sharpening stone you can have a tool that is better than some of the junk that is being sold new today. Sometimes the auctioneer will give you things that are left over that no one bid on. Watch out that you don't get auction fever and let someone bid you up more than it is worth to you.
2. Make friends with an old/retired carpenter or wood worker. Don't be surprised what you can learn from an old man who only wants company.

3. Here are some links that might be helpful.  Read to the bottom of each.

http://web.archive.org/web/20160222152519/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjoConstructionTips1.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20160222152519/http://www.bluestemstrings.com

http://web.archive.org/web/20160328213135/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjoDesign.html#25

http://web.archive.org/web/20160328200041/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjo.html

Suggest you take a look on my BHO home page photos for pictures of a Rudy's (Randy Cordle a BHO member) through rim neck connection.  This is the tradition way to connect a neck to a rim for gourd banjos but works great for any modern design.  

https://www.banjohangout.org/archive/305109

If you have a banjo you can get neck design and measurements off of that neck just extent the neck but leave it as wide as the regular neck at the nut.

You can get some nice hardwood on Craigslist. Someone is always getting rid of an old dresser or dining room table. Take off the top some sanding and glue up and you have an aged hardwood neck. 

Good Luck, have fun.

Glen

Jul 24, 2021 - 12:57:12 PM
likes this

493 posts since 10/18/2020

quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

 


Hi Don,

Wow, carving that neck must have been fun! Do you know if you can recommend to me some chisels to buy? My family always needs some wood work to be done, so probably a good thing to have them around the house. 

Do you think a japanese wood saw would be helpful in this project?

Anyway, I hope that the pine would hold, but if it does spilt, its alright smiley. If it does not work, maybe I will try to make a hardwood neck in the future, if I can get a hold of some. 


this is the SKU numbers of the set of wood working knives I purchased from harbor freight

62673, 4855, 60655, 56186

I use Japanese pull saws for a lot of things I cut, the ones i recommend are a Ryoba 9 1/2 inch it has teeth on both sides i also recommend a Kataba 10 1/2 inch both made by a company called SUIZAN the Japanese pull saws take a little getting accustomed to but once you do you will not ever use a traditional saw again, the pull saw is exactly what the name reads they cut only on the pull stroke if you try to cut on the push stroke you will damage the teeth the blades are very thin and replaceable they are not cheap although you can find cheap ones like anything else,

I did use a band saw to cut the peg head shape on the neck I carved but that was the only thing I cut with a power tool i had a piece of zebra wood laying around that was 4 inches wide and 1 3/4 inches thick by 3 foot long and that is what i used it took me about 3 -4 days to carve it  

the photo is the neck I hand carved




Edited by - Don Smith1959 on 07/24/2021 12:58:21

Jul 25, 2021 - 7:17:06 AM
likes this

58627 posts since 12/14/2005

I picked up a piece of glass shelving from a resale shop, glued it to a piece of flat plywood long enough to have plenty of wood left over at each end.
Then I got a belt for a belt sander, cut it open, and tacked it down over the glass, rough side up.
Didn't cost much.

A neck face pushed and pulled a lotta buncha times over that, comes out pretty dang flat.

Jul 26, 2021 - 3:35:44 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

15037 posts since 8/30/2006

Instead of a draw knife, I suggest rasps. I have a farrier's rasp, then I have the Japanese rasps that do real work.

Shape is everything. Plan ahead, Headstock or peghead shape is where the art comes into play. Grow.

I think the OP has his own project.
He doesn't need to start over, just keep going.

We've seen other projects using a limb for a neck, there is nothing wrong with going simple.

Our White Pine longneck was crude, and yes HO railroad track is tricky for frets, but if it's all you got, then play on.

How did it sound? Like 4 flat tires on a muddy road. The rim was the worst ever, MASONITE, the tone ring was from a lampshade.

So next start a discussion about which type of rim to build, what hardware. Use yer noggin. You might come up with something that we haven't seen before.

Jul 26, 2021 - 5:35:57 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

15037 posts since 8/30/2006

Next on to the inlays

Johnnycake White is a member here
He uses honeybees and skep motifs

Jul 30, 2021 - 7:52:39 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

The photo looks like "real" fretwire from a musical supply place.
Model railroad track looks like a tiny I-beam.

ONE way to hold 'em in is instant GEL glue, not the thin, runny kind.

Wear tight plastic gloves, and don't run glue into more than 3 slots at a time, or it will be dry before you get to the fourth one.


Hi Mike!

Yeah, for some of the loose frets I used some normal "super-strength" wood glue we had lying around. Its almost as strong as iron! Really helped me out with the loose frets.

Jul 30, 2021 - 7:53:38 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Enfield1858
quote:
 

Yep, having a great time! It probably wont be playable for long, but it has been fun to imagine the design and make it.


@BeeEnvironment - that's the spirit!  I've only been playing banjo a few months - with several months out of that when I couldn't visit my teacher for lessons.  Even so, when I think back to how hard it was at the start, to play a simple open string exercise at any more than a snail's pace, as compared to how easy the same exercise feels now when I'm warming up, I'm certain your skills will already have come a long way, and your next build will show it.

Hang in there, mate! And best regards,
Jack


Thanks! I wish you also the best of luck with your banjo lessons!

Jul 30, 2021 - 8:00:34 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by RBuddy

When I mentioned "we all started somewhere" I hoped you were a little bit further along on the woodworking curve than your pics demonstrate.

I think you would serve your ambitions much better by trying to hone your woodworking skills some more before trying to make a stringed instrument.

Certain basic things like being able to make a piece of wood flat and straight are essential to making an instrument.

It can be done with a pocket knife if you spend enough time on it but it is a lot easier with some tools.

I'd start out by taking a piece of your pine tree and just make a surface flat and straight. Test it out by laying the flat section on a table or counter top and making sure there are no gaps between your pine and the flat surface.

Once you've mastered that, consider making a fretless banjo and moving up from there.

I know you've put a lot of time and effort into your neck because it takes time to get where you are with a pocket knife. I applaud you for your major effort and courage to try! But it looks like time to start over with what you've learned so far.

Youtube is your friend, watch videos of guitar and banjo makers and see how it's done.

Maybe consider spending some time looking for odd jobs to make some money for tools or in trade for some tools.

Remember, practice makes perfect.

Good luck!


Thank you for your advice, I appreciate it. Unfortunately, my grandfather, who passed this summer, was a carpenter, and I wish I learned more from him about 10 years ago (when he was still very active), but I would have been too young... He was good at his job though.

Anyway, here is a photo I just took of the neck. I carved the wood from the sides: 


Jul 30, 2021 - 8:01:13 AM

58627 posts since 12/14/2005

As to inlays:
You COULD get a metal stamp, for working LEATHER, heat it up and BRAND it in.

If memory serves, the founders of OME used to slice up plastic knitting needles for round dots.

Or, just heat up a NAIL head, and BRAND a round dot.

Jul 30, 2021 - 8:12 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

I have been reading this thread and have some thoughts.
1. you need tools. Suggest you start checking craigslist and your local newspaper for farm auctions. I have picked up any number of tools that are a bit corroded and rusty but with a little work with some emory paper and a wire brush then a sharpening stone you can have a tool that is better than some of the junk that is being sold new today. Sometimes the auctioneer will give you things that are left over that no one bid on. Watch out that you don't get auction fever and let someone bid you up more than it is worth to you.
2. Make friends with an old/retired carpenter or wood worker. Don't be surprised what you can learn from an old man who only wants company.

3. Here are some links that might be helpful.  Read to the bottom of each.

http://web.archive.org/web/20160222152519/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjoConstructionTips1.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20160222152519/http://www.bluestemstrings.com

http://web.archive.org/web/20160328213135/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjoDesign.html#25

http://web.archive.org/web/20160328200041/http://www.bluestemstrings.com/pageBanjo.html

Suggest you take a look on my BHO home page photos for pictures of a Rudy's (Randy Cordle a BHO member) through rim neck connection.  This is the tradition way to connect a neck to a rim for gourd banjos but works great for any modern design.  

https://www.banjohangout.org/archive/305109

If you have a banjo you can get neck design and measurements off of that neck just extent the neck but leave it as wide as the regular neck at the nut.

You can get some nice hardwood on Craigslist. Someone is always getting rid of an old dresser or dining room table. Take off the top some sanding and glue up and you have an aged hardwood neck. 

Good Luck, have fun.

Glen

 


Glen,

Thanks for the feedback and recommendations! Also thanks very much for those links! They are a valuable resource for my build. 

I don't live far from the Amish in Lancaster County PA, and often they have barn sales selling old books, farm equipment, and tools sometimes. I was able to pick up a planer once, but I have noticed, unfortunately, that barn sales have been decreasing for the past 2-3 years, which is strange. Had I known I would have been into woodworking, I would have bought more of those excellent old tools!

I only wish I could make friends with an old carpenter (there are few in densely populated SE PA). My grandfather was an excellent one, but he sadly passed away last year at ~86 years old. I did learn quite a few nifty tricks and advice from him, but he was a bit too old and getting less active by the time I was 10 many years ago, so it would have been hard for him to show me everything at his age.

I tried to copy the fret board scale from my own banjo, but it was very hard to get it accurate and not make a mistake. I am very thankful that Ken LeVan of Shunk Pennsylvania was kindly able to pass on a long-neck template that I taped onto the neck. 

Good points about the hardwood. If I can get some stronger tools through craigslist or yard sales, and a nice piece of hardwood, it can entirely be possible!

Anyway, here are some photos of my neck from today: 


Jul 30, 2021 - 8:13:35 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Don Smith1959
quote:
Originally posted by BeeEnvironment

 


Hi Don,

Wow, carving that neck must have been fun! Do you know if you can recommend to me some chisels to buy? My family always needs some wood work to be done, so probably a good thing to have them around the house. 

Do you think a japanese wood saw would be helpful in this project?

Anyway, I hope that the pine would hold, but if it does spilt, its alright smiley. If it does not work, maybe I will try to make a hardwood neck in the future, if I can get a hold of some. 


this is the SKU numbers of the set of wood working knives I purchased from harbor freight

62673, 4855, 60655, 56186

I use Japanese pull saws for a lot of things I cut, the ones i recommend are a Ryoba 9 1/2 inch it has teeth on both sides i also recommend a Kataba 10 1/2 inch both made by a company called SUIZAN the Japanese pull saws take a little getting accustomed to but once you do you will not ever use a traditional saw again, the pull saw is exactly what the name reads they cut only on the pull stroke if you try to cut on the push stroke you will damage the teeth the blades are very thin and replaceable they are not cheap although you can find cheap ones like anything else,

I did use a band saw to cut the peg head shape on the neck I carved but that was the only thing I cut with a power tool i had a piece of zebra wood laying around that was 4 inches wide and 1 3/4 inches thick by 3 foot long and that is what i used it took me about 3 -4 days to carve it  

the photo is the neck I hand carved

 

 

 


Thanks for the info, Don! Nice neck also! Very nice quality.

Jul 30, 2021 - 8:14:38 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

I picked up a piece of glass shelving from a resale shop, glued it to a piece of flat plywood long enough to have plenty of wood left over at each end.
Then I got a belt for a belt sander, cut it open, and tacked it down over the glass, rough side up.
Didn't cost much.

A neck face pushed and pulled a lotta buncha times over that, comes out pretty dang flat.


That is actually a very good idea! I might just try it!

Jul 30, 2021 - 8:16:10 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

Instead of a draw knife, I suggest rasps. I have a farrier's rasp, then I have the Japanese rasps that do real work.

Shape is everything. Plan ahead, Headstock or peghead shape is where the art comes into play. Grow.

I think the OP has his own project.
He doesn't need to start over, just keep going.

We've seen other projects using a limb for a neck, there is nothing wrong with going simple.

Our White Pine longneck was crude, and yes HO railroad track is tricky for frets, but if it's all you got, then play on.

How did it sound? Like 4 flat tires on a muddy road. The rim was the worst ever, MASONITE, the tone ring was from a lampshade.

So next start a discussion about which type of rim to build, what hardware. Use yer noggin. You might come up with something that we haven't seen before.


I probably wont make a rim for my pot, but i did start a topic: https://www.banjohangout.org/topic/376633

Jul 30, 2021 - 8:19:07 AM

898 posts since 5/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

As to inlays:
You COULD get a metal stamp, for working LEATHER, heat it up and BRAND it in.

If memory serves, the founders of OME used to slice up plastic knitting needles for round dots.

Or, just heat up a NAIL head, and BRAND a round dot.


Hmm, yeah, inlays might be tough. That nailhead idea may not be so bad though.

Jul 30, 2021 - 10:58:26 AM

Enfield1858

England

133 posts since 8/1/2020

@BeeEnvironment - thank you for the good wishes with my lessons.

Re. pull saws; I don't know why so many people have the idea that the Japanese are the only people who make and use pull saws, when it's completely untrue.  In the US, Irwin sell pull saws;  though nowadays they are made in China.

As is so often the case, Irwin was bought out by American Tool Companies in 1993; in 2002, America TC were bought out by Newell Rubbermaid; in 2008, Irwin closed its DeWitt, NE, plant, moving production to China; and in 2016, Newell's tool businesses were bought by Stanley, Black & Decker - and almost certainly ended up as yet another engineering company run by remote execs whose only concern is to "Make fast bucks FASTER!"

Pull saws have been made and used in Europe for centuries, by musical and scientific instrument makers, and cabinet makers, and are still made and used in England, where they are called Gent's Razor Saws. ('Gents' is a term used by English tool makers for a small tool used for fine and delicate work - doesn't mean they were only intended for use by the gentry!)

This Victor  Brand Gent's Razor Saw is made in England, and has a brass back as used on tenon saws - a feature I've not seen on Japanese razor saws. This gives the very thin blade support in use. Dimensions are 6" long, 3/4" deep, 40tpi, and blade thickness 0.010"

https://www.axminstertools.com/victor-razor-saw-910304?glCountry=GB

With best regards,
Jack

Jul 30, 2021 - 1:37:29 PM

493 posts since 10/18/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Enfield1858

@BeeEnvironment - thank you for the good wishes with my lessons.

Re. pull saws; I don't know why so many people have the idea that the Japanese are the only people who make and use pull saws, when it's completely untrue.  In the US, Irwin sell pull saws;  though nowadays they are made in China.

As is so often the case, Irwin was bought out by American Tool Companies in 1993; in 2002, America TC were bought out by Newell Rubbermaid; in 2008, Irwin closed its DeWitt, NE, plant, moving production to China; and in 2016, Newell's tool businesses were bought by Stanley, Black & Decker - and almost certainly ended up as yet another engineering company run by remote execs whose only concern is to "Make fast bucks FASTER!"

Pull saws have been made and used in Europe for centuries, by musical and scientific instrument makers, and cabinet makers, and are still made and used in England, where they are called Gent's Razor Saws. ('Gents' is a term used by English tool makers for a small tool used for fine and delicate work - doesn't mean they were only intended for use by the gentry!)

This Victor  Brand Gent's Razor Saw is made in England, and has a brass back as used on tenon saws - a feature I've not seen on Japanese razor saws. This gives the very thin blade support in use. Dimensions are 6" long, 3/4" deep, 40tpi, and blade thickness 0.010"

https://www.axminstertools.com/victor-razor-saw-910304?glCountry=GB

With best regards,
Jack


Well you are correct, in the fact there are many makers of pull saws but the ones I prefer are the Japanese styles which are thinner blades and yes there is one with a spine on the top edge for stiffening the intire length of the saw, the two I suggested to @BeeEnviroment are the two I prefer because neither has a spine for stiffening the blade I can literaly take eiter of the two I suggested to BeeEnviroment and set a 8-9 inch wide board by 32 inches long in a clamp and take a 1/8 inch slice from the thickness which allows me to make a solid top and bottom for the mountain dulcimers i am making, my band saw will only allow me to slice a 6 inch wide board, and believe it or not when the cut is finished with either the Ryoba or the Kataba it is actually close to 1/8 inch thickness the full 32 inch length with very little adjustment to thickness needed or sanding can you do that with a pull saw that has a spine absolutely not the spine will not allow you to.

Edited by - Don Smith1959 on 07/30/2021 13:41:06

Jul 30, 2021 - 2:31:52 PM

Enfield1858

England

133 posts since 8/1/2020

@Don Smith1959 - Japanese pull saws have blades thinner than 10 thou? Are you sure, as I've never seen one. And, TBH, if I wanted to take a thin slice off the edge of a 32" board, I wouldn't use a fine pull saw to do it - though if I angled the blade of that razor saw correctly, I could certainly do the job with that.

With best regards,
Jack

Edited by - Enfield1858 on 07/30/2021 14:35:37

Jul 30, 2021 - 3:46:36 PM

493 posts since 10/18/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Enfield1858

@Don Smith1959 - Japanese pull saws have blades thinner than 10 thou? Are you sure, as I've never seen one. And, TBH, if I wanted to take a thin slice off the edge of a 32" board, I wouldn't use a fine pull saw to do it - though if I angled the blade of that razor saw correctly, I could certainly do the job with that.

With best regards,
Jack


I never said take a slice from an edge re read my reply I stated I can take a 1/8 inch slice across the full width of a board that is 8-9 inches wide, I have to be able to do that if I do not want to rip a 8-9 inch board down the middle to get two pieces 4- 4 1/2 inches and then glue back together, i  like to use one solid one piece top or botom with no glue joint my band saw will only raise 6 inches you cannot rip a 1/8 inch slice from a 9 inch board if the head of the bandsaw will only raise 6 inches

I do not believe you are understanding what I said the slices i make are 8-9 inces wide by 1/8 inch thick you can not do that with a saw that has a stiffening spine 

The japanese pull saw that has a spine is called a Douzuki they are only for cutting a board that is no wider than 2-3 inces I use one of those for making dovetails

Jul 30, 2021 - 4:59:37 PM

493 posts since 10/18/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Don Smith1959
quote:
Originally posted by Enfield1858

@Don Smith1959 - Japanese pull saws have blades thinner than 10 thou? Are you sure, as I've never seen one. And, TBH, if I wanted to take a thin slice off the edge of a 32" board, I wouldn't use a fine pull saw to do it - though if I angled the blade of that razor saw correctly, I could certainly do the job with that.

With best regards,
Jack


I never said take a slice from an edge re read  my reply and i never stated they were thinner than 0.010 they are in fact 0.012  I stated I can take a 1/8 inch slice across the full width of a board that is 8-9 inches wide, I have to be able to do that if I do not want to rip a 8-9 inch board down the middle to get two pieces 4- 4 1/2 inches and then glue back together, i  like to use one solid one piece top or botom with no glue joint my band saw will only raise 6 inches you cannot rip a 1/8 inch slice from a 9 inch board if the head of the bandsaw will only raise 6 inches

I do not believe you are understanding what I said the slices i make are 8-9 inces wide by 1/8 inch thick you can not do that with a saw that has a stiffening spine 

The japanese pull saw that has a spine is called a Douzuki they are only for cutting a board that is no wider than 2-3 inces I use one of those for making dovetails


Edited by - Don Smith1959 on 07/30/2021 17:09:27

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