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Jul 18, 2021 - 7:04:11 PM
7146 posts since 2/14/2006
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Has anyone experimented with dynamic mini clip on mics as opposed to condenser mini clip on mics? I'm wondering if the dynamic mini mic will avoid feedback better than the condenser?

Jul 20, 2021 - 7:16:17 PM

7146 posts since 2/14/2006
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I love the huge response on this topic.  

I think I'll try this dynamic Behringer gooseneck... for $25 you can't go wrong.  I just need to figure out how to mount it to the banjo.

 

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TA312S--behringer-ta-312s-gooseneck-dynamic-microphone

Jul 20, 2021 - 10:19:33 PM
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3225 posts since 10/17/2009

Dynamic doesn't mean it will avoid feedback any better.

The actual mic specs, pattern and it's frequency response can play a role. Mostly though dealing with feedback, gain before feedback; is about basic sound set-up, no matter the mic.

Edited by - banjoak on 07/20/2021 22:21:17

Jul 21, 2021 - 4:50:32 AM

banjoy

USA

9795 posts since 7/1/2006

Generally speaking, dynamic mics are less prone to feedback than condenser mics because they're not as sensitive to background noise. At least goes the conventional wisdom...

I had a mini-flex mic mounted inside my banjo for about 20 years and, coincidentally, listed it four days ago on eBay to sell since I don't use it anymore

ebay.com/itm/224536866559

This mic was designed for mounting outside an instrument, but I rigged it up to live inside the banjo pot. It seemed to work fine.

I can tell you for sure, these mini dynamic mics are hyper sensitive to placement. Just a small movement can make a noticeable difference in sound, so you really have to play around with it to find that "sweet spot" that sounds best to your ear.

Good luck, have fun with it.

Edited by - banjoy on 07/21/2021 04:54:07

Jul 21, 2021 - 7:52:57 PM
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3225 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by banjoy

Generally speaking, dynamic mics are less prone to feedback than condenser mics because they're not as sensitive to background noise. At least goes the conventional wisdom...


That conventional wisdom is a misconception.

It's the total path that matters for the potential acoustic gain. A mic's sensitivity has little to do with potential acoustic gain... since it simply affects how much gain (ie electrical current) is needed at the pre-amp stage.  Given signal out of pre-amp stage being equal, will have same PAG.

You might be conflating some other phenomena regarding quiet background noise... really moot, plays no role in live sound applications or feedback.

Jul 22, 2021 - 1:29:52 AM

143 posts since 12/4/2007

quote:
Originally posted by banjo1971

I love the huge response on this topic.  

I think I'll try this dynamic Behringer gooseneck... for $25 you can't go wrong.  I just need to figure out how to mount it to the banjo.

 

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TA312S--behringer-ta-312s-gooseneck-dynamic-microphone

That's not the right tool for the job.

A pickup in the banjo and and a mic on stage to step up to for breaks would get you closer to where you want to be on the feed back problem.

Gain staging both is critical. you can't fix the problem with different gear if you do not know how to use the gear to begin with. Understand how a feedback loop works and what causes it to help find your solution. It might be a simple adjustment to what you already have going on like moving a monitor or speaker or getting the gain staging right.


Jul 22, 2021 - 3:37:37 PM

11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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Microphones worked great until foldback monitors became ubiquitous in the early 1970s. I used those for the first time in 1972 though I'd heard of 'em by then.

60 years later, banjo players keep asking the same question as you, hoping for some magic bullet that will make the sound like that in their bedrooms only loud enough for an audience while hearing everything on stage clear as a bell. Oh yea, it has to be invisible.

That transducer does not exist. Perhaps it never will. Pickups are sounding very good these days, though. This one is my hands down favorite. Properly installed, it's as close to nothing as I've ever heard.
 

EMG ACB

I had one of these and hated it till, in an emergency, I ripped it out of my banjo and stuck it to the E foot of my upright bass where I love it (still there). Horrid pickup for banjo, IMO.

McIntyre BF-60

Aug 5, 2021 - 5:21:38 PM

93 posts since 1/23/2012

quote:
Originally posted by banjo1971

Has anyone experimented with dynamic mini clip on mics as opposed to condenser mini clip on mics? I'm wondering if the dynamic mini mic will avoid feedback better than the condenser?


I have been happy with a Sennheiser e904, attached with an Audix D-clamp. Here is a short video of how it sets up:

https://www.patreon.com/posts/32856004

Aug 5, 2021 - 5:24:57 PM
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74 posts since 5/20/2020

when amping up I uses the suction cup pickup right in the middle of the drum

amazon.com/AXL-Acoustic-Guitar...002C741B8

Aug 15, 2021 - 6:23:39 AM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

Condenser microphones need Real Phantom Power, 48V. I have a dedicated PP for my Ear Trumpet Labs Louise. It behaves well.

Anything else makes them noisy. Boards and devices with Phantom Power claims are bogus. Allen Heath, Focusrite, and Mackie 48V buttons are elixir buttons. Use a dedicated Phantom Power device.

I use the Cling-On on my banjo. It works well with my wireless guitar gear.

Aug 15, 2021 - 4:24:04 PM
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11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo

Hello,

Condenser microphones need Real Phantom Power, 48V. I have a dedicated PP for my Ear Trumpet Labs Louise. It behaves well.

Anything else makes them noisy. Boards and devices with Phantom Power claims are bogus. Allen Heath, Focusrite, and Mackie 48V buttons are elixir buttons. Use a dedicated Phantom Power device.
 


That is flat out not true.

What may be true is that you were attempting to use a phantom powered mic with a board that did not provide 48 Volts. Many don't including the old Mackie 408/608/808 PA heads — those provided 24V only. This caused a lot of misunderstandings when cheap MXL mics flooded the market about 25 years ago or so and none of them worked with these very popular PA heads. The non-powered Mackie mixers always provided true 48 Volts and did not have this issue (not counting defective units, of course).

Phantom power sends Voltage up both leads #2 & #3 and return via #1. It can be 48, 24 or even 12V. Older AKG mics, for example, could use anything between 9–52V.

My Zoom R24 recorder has a voltage selector in Settings for sending phantom through its mic pre-amps. This is done to extend battery life so again, you need to check the settings before hooking up a microphone. The R16 and R8 do not IIRC.

Zoom R24 phantom voltage selection

There have been recent attempts to reduce phantom voltage requirements since quality modern components do not need 48V. The cheap components used in so many modern mics do, however, so those attempts to change the standard have fallen on deaf ears.

Aug 15, 2021 - 4:33:32 PM

11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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quote:
Originally posted by Buck the Banjo Player

when amping up I uses the suction cup pickup right in the middle of the drum

amazon.com/AXL-Acoustic-Guitar...002C741B8


Whhhhhhaaaattt???? There is a suction cup built into these?

I'm a dealer and have never ordered this or the PG-801 for stock so I had no idea. I love it.

Are you plugging into a guitar amp, preamp or ?? Enquiring minds want to know.




Edited by - mikehalloran on 08/15/2021 16:39:55

Aug 15, 2021 - 11:42:25 PM

11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran
 

There is a suction cup built into these?

I'm a dealer and have never ordered this or the PG-801 for stock so I had no idea. I love it.

Are you plugging into a guitar amp, preamp or ?? Enquiring minds want to know.

 

 

 


I heard back from Buck: " …but yes the AXL Pick ups have a suction cup, they stick to Mylar Forever But only stick to wood with a ton of lacquer."

Well, they're going on my stocking order.

Aug 16, 2021 - 5:09:37 AM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran
quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo

Hello,

Condenser microphones need Real Phantom Power, 48V. I have a dedicated PP for my Ear Trumpet Labs Louise. It behaves well.

Anything else makes them noisy. Boards and devices with Phantom Power claims are bogus. Allen Heath, Focusrite, and Mackie 48V buttons are elixir buttons. Use a dedicated Phantom Power device.
 


That is flat out not true.

What may be true is that you were attempting to use a phantom powered mic with a board that did not provide 48 Volts. Many don't including the old Mackie 408/608/808 PA heads — those provided 24V only. This caused a lot of misunderstandings when cheap MXL mics flooded the market about 25 years ago or so and none of them worked with these very popular PA heads. The non-powered Mackie mixers always provided true 48 Volts and did not have this issue (not counting defective units, of course).

Phantom power sends Voltage up both leads #2 & #3 and return via #1. It can be 48, 24 or even 12V. Older AKG mics, for example, could use anything between 9–52V.

My Zoom R24 recorder has a voltage selector in Settings for sending phantom through its mic pre-amps. This is done to extend battery life so again, you need to check the settings before hooking up a microphone. The R16 and R8 do not IIRC.

Zoom R24 phantom voltage selection

There have been recent attempts to reduce phantom voltage requirements since quality modern components do not need 48V. The cheap components used in so many modern mics do, however, so those attempts to change the standard have fallen on deaf ears.


Hello Mike,

Funny thing. My statements are about the Ear Trumpet Labs Louise and Phantom Power. No Board or device claiming 48V worked with this ribbon condenser. PreSonus, Allen and Heath, and Focusrite with others cannot power this ribbon condenser. It squalls and whines beyond 7 and cannot get to 0. It was Ear Trumpet Labs who said get it its own Phantom Power unit. Best advice I was given. 

This experience was based on live gigs. No theory was involved. Either it worked or it didn't. Nothing fancy. I would suspect that more condenser mics have this problem. 

What brought be to this conclusion was Focusrite. Focusrite has 48V phantom power. I was supporting my wife's Cradle Roll Sabbath School Class via ZOOM, I used the Louise to capture my guitar/Banjo/dobro when She was singing. All worked until the 3rd session. One Sabbath, the Louise stopped working. No coaxing the Focusrite would assist. I knew my Allen and Heath Z10 would not work. I had tried it years ago. I got out my dedicated Phantom Power and I was back in service.  

I use this setup with the Focusrite for JamKazam. The Phantom Power device is the ticket for Ear Trumpet Labs. My comments were based on experience. 

I have a tough time seeing a board distributing 48V to every mic port. Boards are like USB ports. The total power in watts divided by the number of ports is what each port gets. I have yet to see a board or device give the number dedicated Watts to Phantom Power. Watts are for speakers. 

Edited by - Aradobanjo on 08/16/2021 05:42:25

Aug 16, 2021 - 10:06:49 AM

11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo
quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran
quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo

Hello,

Condenser microphones need Real Phantom Power, 48V. I have a dedicated PP for my Ear Trumpet Labs Louise. It behaves well.

Anything else makes them noisy. Boards and devices with Phantom Power claims are bogus. Allen Heath, Focusrite, and Mackie 48V buttons are elixir buttons. Use a dedicated Phantom Power device.
 


That is flat out not true.

What may be true is that you were attempting to use a phantom powered mic with a board that did not provide 48 Volts. Many don't including the old Mackie 408/608/808 PA heads — those provided 24V only. This caused a lot of misunderstandings when cheap MXL mics flooded the market about 25 years ago or so and none of them worked with these very popular PA heads. The non-powered Mackie mixers always provided true 48 Volts and did not have this issue (not counting defective units, of course).

Phantom power sends Voltage up both leads #2 & #3 and return via #1. It can be 48, 24 or even 12V. Older AKG mics, for example, could use anything between 9–52V.

My Zoom R24 recorder has a voltage selector in Settings for sending phantom through its mic pre-amps. This is done to extend battery life so again, you need to check the settings before hooking up a microphone. The R16 and R8 do not IIRC.

Zoom R24 phantom voltage selection

There have been recent attempts to reduce phantom voltage requirements since quality modern components do not need 48V. The cheap components used in so many modern mics do, however, so those attempts to change the standard have fallen on deaf ears.


Hello Mike,

Funny thing. My statements are about the Ear Trumpet Labs Louise and Phantom Power. No Board or device claiming 48V worked with this ribbon condenser. PreSonus, Allen and Heath, and Focusrite with others cannot power this ribbon condenser. It squalls and whines beyond 7 and cannot get to 0. It was Ear Trumpet Labs who said get it its own Phantom Power unit. Best advice I was given. 

This experience was based on live gigs. No theory was involved. Either it worked or it didn't. Nothing fancy. I would suspect that more condenser mics have this problem. 

What brought be to this conclusion was Focusrite. Focusrite has 48V phantom power. I was supporting my wife's Cradle Roll Sabbath School Class via ZOOM, I used the Louise to capture my guitar/Banjo/dobro when She was singing. All worked until the 3rd session. One Sabbath, the Louise stopped working. No coaxing the Focusrite would assist. I knew my Allen and Heath Z10 would not work. I had tried it years ago. I got out my dedicated Phantom Power and I was back in service.  

I use this setup with the Focusrite for JamKazam. The Phantom Power device is the ticket for Ear Trumpet Labs. My comments were based on experience. 

I have a tough time seeing a board distributing 48V to every mic port. Boards are like USB ports. The total power in watts divided by the number of ports is what each port gets. I have yet to see a board or device give the number dedicated Watts to Phantom Power. Watts are for speakers. 


If Ear Trumpet was having issues with boards' 48V supplies, the howling would be heard 'round the world—at least the internet. 

In that case, the first thing to check is the cable. Is it wired correctly? The shields should be attached to the shell at the board (XLR-M end) and should not be tied to #1. When I googled to see if this was a known issue, this popped up from Ear Trumpet Labs (spoiler— most problems are the cable).

Ear Trumpet Labs FAQ

Then I found this:

Ear Trumpet Phantom requirements — 24V

"Our mics require at least 24V of phantom power. Less than that won’t hurt them, but they may perform erratically. We sell one we like from Rolls ourselves (see below) but any 24V or more phantom power adapter will do!"
 

As I wrote earlier, this is an indicator that they are not using cheap components for this.

Does your mic have any switches? If so, try burnishing by switching back and forth a hundred or more times (disconnect the cable first, of course). I recently brought one of my Neumann mics back to life by doing just this. Sennheiser wanted to charge me $500 + parts to even look at it. Whew!

If the cable is good your issue may be the fault of a component in the mic. It does happen. Fortunately, these have a lifetime warranty. In any case, you should be able to connect to any board's 24V or 48V phantom supply and it should work. I'm certain that the manufacturer would agree.

I don't know where you live. If it's my part of California, I'll invite you over and we could inspect mics and cables, discuss banjos… the fun stuff that bores our spouses to distraction.

Aug 17, 2021 - 4:55:30 PM

3225 posts since 10/17/2009

Just noticed a little misconception about condenser mics.

My statements are about the Ear Trumpet Labs Louise and Phantom Power. No Board or device claiming 48V worked with this ribbon condenser. PreSonus, Allen and Heath, and Focusrite with others cannot power this ribbon condenser. It squalls and whines beyond 7 and cannot get to 0. It was Ear Trumpet Labs who said get it its own Phantom Power unit. Best advice I was given. 

But probably unnecessary. First, Ribbon and condensers are vastly different. ETL Louise, like all their mics, is a condenser. I've used them; like most all true condensers, require no separate unit is needed if using mixer/interface supplying standard 48V phantom; those all work just fine to power the mic. The exception would be a tube condenser, which requires separate unit needing to supply more than 48v, (but ETL is not a tube).

Squalls and whines mentioned are not due to 48v source, most likely feedback, from too much gain for the mic. (understanding how to use condensers, generally need much less gain). Phantom power itself, source where it comes from (mixer v stand alone), would not affect/change/fix the sound. Possible something is damaged; from something internally faulty in mixer or interface/preamp; or mic itself; (that Focusrite worked, then stopped, indicates perhaps problem with that device); or simply could be bad mic cable.

 

I have a tough time seeing a board distributing 48V to every mic port. Boards are like USB ports. The total power in watts divided by the number of ports is what each port gets. I have yet to see a board or device give the number dedicated Watts to Phantom Power. Watts are for speakers. 

Not a problem... basically because that's not really how it works. The number of ports is unimportant. Current (amps) and resistance (ohms) are important. Ohms are equal to volts divided by amps. Watts are equal to volts times amps. FWIW, most all condenser mics require very small amp load... mixers/interfaces should have no problem.

Aug 18, 2021 - 6:18:42 AM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

I can get out my electronics book and Watts=V x I where I equals amps. R (resistance = V /I. Wow we agree. Until this. Energy is never free and shared energy is dependent on R at each circuit.

As I said, 48V has to come from somewhere. 120V is the typical mixer input. 220 is European. Mixing boards are misers. 120V is shared across all ports.

I have worked with FOH people and say PP with gain up to 0. Fail! After multiple attempts, I was ready to dump the Louise. I went directly to ETL and complained about this system with its claims. The Louise was supposed to prevent squelching and ringing. This was all that it was doing.

I was directed to use a dedicated phantom power and the Louise behaved well. Gone were the squelching and ringing. Then I was clued on how everything was so clean. All videos were captured with Focusrite equipment. So, I picked up a Focusrite Solo V3. COVID-19 was hitting and needing a audio manager for collaborative use was important. The odd part was all of Focusrite products are geared to computers. None are geared to FOH direct use.

Focusrite Solo V3 has two ports. 1 XLR and 1 1/4" Guitar is it. With so few ports, 48V should be no problem. It was fine for a while. Then it quite. The Louise was dead on the Focusrite. When I brought my dedicated 48V Ohuhu, the Louise worked again.

Using Ohuhu, the Louise works with any Mixer. I can be in a noisy venue and the Louise will just deliver the presentation.

Correction: The Louise is a large diaphragm condenser. Overall, I like the Louise now.

Aug 18, 2021 - 4:40:44 PM

11679 posts since 10/27/2006
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quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo

Hello,

I can get out my electronics book and Watts=V x I where I equals amps. R (resistance = V /I. Wow we agree. Until this. Energy is never free and shared energy is dependent on R at each circuit.

As I said, 48V has to come from somewhere. 120V is the typical mixer input. 220 is European. Mixing boards are misers. 120V is shared across all ports.

I have worked with FOH people and say PP with gain up to 0. Fail! After multiple attempts, I was ready to dump the Louise. I went directly to ETL and complained about this system with its claims. The Louise was supposed to prevent squelching and ringing. This was all that it was doing.

I was directed to use a dedicated phantom power and the Louise behaved well. Gone were the squelching and ringing. Then I was clued on how everything was so clean. All videos were captured with Focusrite equipment. So, I picked up a Focusrite Solo V3. COVID-19 was hitting and needing a audio manager for collaborative use was important. The odd part was all of Focusrite products are geared to computers. None are geared to FOH direct use.

Focusrite Solo V3 has two ports. 1 XLR and 1 1/4" Guitar is it. With so few ports, 48V should be no problem. It was fine for a while. Then it quite. The Louise was dead on the Focusrite. When I brought my dedicated 48V Ohuhu, the Louise worked again.

Using Ohuhu, the Louise works with any Mixer. I can be in a noisy venue and the Louise will just deliver the presentation.

Correction: The Louise is a large diaphragm condenser. Overall, I like the Louise now.


There are too many of these being used in live applications and I've plugged too many into boards at festivals. You have a defective microphone.

Aug 18, 2021 - 6:53:33 PM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

There are too many of these being used in live applications and I've plugged too many into boards at festivals. You have a defective microphone.

Hello Mike,

I thought the same also. If a separate Phantom Power solved all problems as directed by ETL, it works perfectly by ETL design. So what if it takes a dedicated 48V  if it works better than expected. Not all boards can provide dedicated 48V. I attempted to use this microphone with several digital and analog boards. ToneMaster required parametric shaping to get it tolerable. Once a dedicated 48V was supplied nothing fancy was required. I can run it like a dynamic. 

The true test is standing 3' from the microphone and be heard. That is what makes the Louise a fantastic microphone. Not defective at all when it delivers the goods with sugar and spice. 

Edited by - Aradobanjo on 08/18/2021 18:54:15

Aug 18, 2021 - 11:51:15 PM

3225 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran

There are too many of these being used in live applications and I've plugged too many into boards at festivals. You have a defective microphone.

Similar experience, on-board phantom power works as designed, and has successfully for millions of devices and users for decades.

Indeed the 48v on mixers, pre-amps, or interfaces are there for one reason... to supply phantom power to devices, namely condenser mics... such as ETL Louise. These are all engineered by folks that understand electronics. Proof comes in that successfully used for decades, now pretty much a standard feature. I personally have ran many mixers/pre-amps/interfaces and have set-up other users; using condensers, including various ETL mics; and with using on-board phantom power. Not a problem with design or concept; doing what it's designed to do.

The claim about some "real" or dedicated phantom power is nonsense; as are misinformed conjecture and comments about how power/circuit design works in these devices, ports and 120v; just nonsense. Just not how it works.

You have a defective microphone.

It doesn't seem like the mic is defective, as he got it to work. My bet is you, me or most other experienced user would not have any issue with using that exact mic with on-board phantom power.  As pointed out on ETL page, designed to work with standard on-board 48v. The problem is thus likely user actual interface and/or understanding/problem solving.

Most likely in this case is no simply phantom power is coming out of the interface at all (can test that); thus won't work. It is possible that interface's 48v PP died, rare but can happen (I experienced it once in 40 years). If that's the case, a separate power supply is a work around option; but perhaps better is perhaps to simply repair it, maybe should be addressed by manufacturer. 

But, much more likely that the 48v is simply not turned on; which is far, far less rare. Should note, one problem that some interfaces have had is button; esp soft button where when unit is powered off, when back on, the 48v is no longer engaged and has to be manually turned back on.

Of course other possible user issues are not rare; settings/setup which come up that might be the problem of no sound. General basic understanding and patient problem solving/testing skills typically fixes (or at least isolates).

 

In 40+ years of running sound system equipment, have heard a lot of misinformation, myths, and poor advice (esp based on limited anecdotal experience); which has folks frustratingly waste money and time.

Aug 19, 2021 - 2:17:19 AM

3225 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo
There are too many of these being used in live applications and I've plugged too many into boards at festivals. You have a defective microphone.

Hello Mike,

I thought the same also. If a separate Phantom Power solved all problems as directed by ETL, it works perfectly by ETL design. So what if it takes a dedicated 48V  if it works better than expected. Not all boards can provide dedicated 48V. I attempted to use this microphone with several digital and analog boards. ToneMaster required parametric shaping to get it tolerable. Once a dedicated 48V was supplied nothing fancy was required. I can run it like a dynamic. 

The true test is standing 3' from the microphone and be heard. That is what makes the Louise a fantastic microphone. Not defective at all when it delivers the goods with sugar and spice. 


Not sure who at ETL directed you? The only reason would need external is if the mixer/pre-amp or interface doesn't have it. As their website states:

In all situations with a PA or house sound it should be a non-issue since virtually all mixing boards provide phantom power.

That's been my experience with ETL mics, (as with other condensers), don't have any issue with any on-board phantom power. 

Not all boards can provide dedicated 48V.

As far as the mentioned "dedicated 48v"?;  essentially a board either has phantom power or it doesn't (such as older mixers).

The mic essentially doesn't care where the 48v comes from. An external phantom power won't make your mic work better, nor make any difference in sound. The basic design condensers and phantom power over balanced XLR is that it supplies power and doesn't affect tone.

 

The true test is standing 3' from the microphone and be heard.

Has nothing to do with phantom power source. Mostly another is another misconception about a mic having reach... but is just a function of setting gain/trim, albeit mic design (sensitivity, tuning, polar pattern) plays role. Less sensitivity turn up the gan, more sensitivity turn down the gain.

Aug 20, 2021 - 4:08:25 AM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

Interesting discussion. I have a similar time with audio reinforcement. The 3’ test is very valid. It represents gain usage. Every condenser I saw used was muted because too much gain is very noisy.

The Louise and other ETL products are supposed to be immersive and reach. The 3’ test is one of their marketing tests. When I could replicate, I was happy.

I used to think the same thing about boards with Phantom Power buttons. I questioned ETL hard about their claims. Every FOH use was a train wreck with this device. Every sound technician wanted to treat it like a dynamic.

The dedicated 48V PSU was a game changer for me and my Louise. I took ownership of feeding the mic what it required. Other condensers may benefit from a dedicated PP PSU.

Edited by - Aradobanjo on 08/20/2021 04:16:16

Aug 20, 2021 - 5:29:27 AM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

I have other options. I use the wireless XVIVE U3C. This provides Phantom Power wirelessly. The Louise works well with it. I will be using this during our daughter's wedding reception. Cords get messy.


Aug 20, 2021 - 11:58:37 AM
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93 posts since 1/23/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Aradobanjo

Hello,

Condenser microphones need Real Phantom Power, 48V. I have a dedicated PP for my Ear Trumpet Labs Louise. It behaves well.

Anything else makes them noisy. Boards and devices with Phantom Power claims are bogus. Allen Heath, Focusrite, and Mackie 48V buttons are elixir buttons. Use a dedicated Phantom Power device.

I use the Cling-On on my banjo. It works well with my wireless guitar gear.


It sounds like you may have run into bad luck with phantom power, but I assure you that the vast majority of condenser mics and active DI's that you see on professional stages are getting phantom power from the mixing desks, with no issues.

Aug 20, 2021 - 6:18:25 PM

2860 posts since 12/4/2009

It sounds like you may have run into bad luck with phantom power, but I assure you that the vast majority of condenser mics and active DI's that you see on professional stages are getting phantom power from the mixing desks, with no issues.

Hello Bill,

Nothing is wrong with anything but assumptions. I assumed 48V buttons on mixers ports work. I have worked with condenser microphones.

The ETL Louise  meets its marketing hype with a dedicated and true 48V. That was my premise. How we get off from that premise is because I know now not all boards provide 48V on demand.
 

Other condensers are just a finicky as the Louise. Others are not. What brings to this point are universal statements that I know now cannot be supported.

The ETL Louise is my first aberration away from universal statements about mixers with 48V buttons. Bose, PreSonus, Allen and Heath, and Mackie are not chump change. They all have 48V buttons.

I bought a compressor, feedback suppressors, and the Bose to control the Louise. In my past, bad behaving condensers where pushed aside, regulated as defective. I thought I had a lemon. 

I now realize that 48V buttons are a guess and that is about it. Prove that 48V is coming out clean. Any noise in the power can mess with the condenser's operation. I was taught to trust the button and not the condenser. However, the engineer I learned from always used a separate PP PSU. He never trusted in the 48V button. I agree with him now. 

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