Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

686
Banjo Lovers Online


Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Jun 22, 2021 - 4:44:04 AM
like this

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26070 posts since 8/3/2003

E-mail from an old friend or a scam?

Got an e-mail from a bluegrasser that I hadn't heard from in nearly 4 years. Asking for a favor. Saying she didn't have access to a phone(???) and she needed to ask me a question and would I please e-mail her. Didn't think much about it, so I replied.

Then got another one that said she needed a gift for her niece but her credit card had been compromised and would I go to Walmart and get her a $400 gift card. Warning lights going off in my head.

So, I e-mailed back that I thought this was a scam and someone had hacked into her e-mail account and I wasn't going to fall for such nonsense.

Needless to say, I haven't heard from her since.

Never got one like that before. Wonder how many people actually "helped" her and lost their money?

Jun 22, 2021 - 4:50:46 AM
likes this

banjoy

USA

9681 posts since 7/1/2006

Definitely SCAM. Someone got ahold of your friend's contact list. There is plenty 'o literature out there about this type of scam.

This is not a new and different scam. This scam has been around for years.

As far as how many people have been scammed by this type of thing, the answer is: without exception, everyone who fell for it. Scammers do this because there's a sucker born every minute and it doesn't take many gullible people to make it worthwhile.

Edited by - banjoy on 06/22/2021 04:52:11

Jun 22, 2021 - 4:59:48 AM
likes this

461 posts since 7/13/2008

There are a lot of variations on this scam. But they all follow this same general pattern. Lots of times they are set up to sound like they came from a relative in trouble. I usually check the address they came from by clicking it in the upper left hand corner. It might say the person's name but when you click on their name it has a totally different e-mail address. This is especially true if it is supposed to be coming from some place like City Bank or Microsoft. You will notice that the address that drops down appears to be a personal e-mail address as opposed to a corporate or commercial e-mail address.

Jun 22, 2021 - 6:03:35 AM
likes this

m06

England

10320 posts since 10/5/2006

Yep, hover over the ‘sender’s’ name and you’ll see that the email address is not your friend’s email.

The same check works for scammers presenting as if a known company that you use. The actual email is either a faked derivative of the email of the company they’re pretending to be or sometimes bears no relation at all.

Jun 22, 2021 - 6:21:07 AM
likes this

maxmax

Sweden

1496 posts since 8/1/2005

Once every six months or so I get an email from a BanjoHangout member which is obviously spam. I contacted him here through the Hangout and he said he hasn't used that email address for many years and can no longer log into it. It's from a Yahoo address, apparently tons of old Yahoo addresses were hacked and someone else is sending out emails through their old accounts using their contacts. 

Jun 22, 2021 - 6:25:01 AM

maxmax

Sweden

1496 posts since 8/1/2005

quote:
Originally posted by m06

Yep, hover over the ‘sender’s’ name and you’ll see that the email address is not your friend’s email.

The same check works for scammers presenting as if a known company that you use. The actual email is either a faked derivative of the email of the company they’re pretending to be or sometimes bears no relation at all.


Although not as common, it's actually quite easy to send an email using someone else's exact correct name and email address. It won't be from the same server host as the email account is from, so a good spam filter will catch it, but they do seem to get through here and there.

Jun 22, 2021 - 7:07:57 AM

heavy5

USA

1765 posts since 11/3/2016

Had a guy interested in a banjo I have advertised here & wanted to pay me thru some credit card he has via him being a veteran ? After speaking w/ him on the phone he eventually agreed to send a cashiers check , but sounded a bit suspicious (flakey).
A bit of time has elapsed since then & no ck but I really don't expect one .

Jun 22, 2021 - 7:12:42 AM

1119 posts since 9/6/2019
Online Now

I get these all the time from folks whose accounts have been hacked. They are usually in some foreign country and in trouble with the law or had all of their things stolen and need money.

Jun 22, 2021 - 7:22:08 AM
likes this

57698 posts since 12/14/2005

Got a real fun e-mail a few years back, (allegedly!) from the wife of a guy I had been in a folk trio with.
Claimed to be stuck in Manila, in the Philippines, having been mugged and robbed of everything. Phone, wallet, return ticket.
Needed to pay the hotel bill, or they wouldn't give her back her passport.
OK, you lie to me, I get to lie to YOU!
Emailed back.
Pretended I was a recently divorced woman, and my ex-hubby and his partner were honeymooning in- - - MANILA.
Told "her" to give me the name of the hotel, and I'd call ex-hubby's cell, tell him to get over there with his credit card, pay off everything, and deduct it from the alimony.

Also told her not to worry about getting a flight back to Milwaukee, as I knew a guy named Bob, with connections to the airline industry.

The REAL friend's husband IS Bob, and he was a shuttle bus driver for the airport parking lot. THAT'S the connection!
But the scammer wouldn't know that.

Had a couple e-mails back & forth, until the scammer just gave up.

Jun 22, 2021 - 7:36:52 AM
like this

banjoy

USA

9681 posts since 7/1/2006

I've mentioned this guy before, James Veitch, who has a ton of YouTube videos (I think he calls himself Sir Scamalot) where he just plays with these scammers. He's done talks about this very scam (stranded friends boo hoo) but I can't find that right now, but this video gives you a flavor of how deep his toying goes...

Here's a TedTalk he gave, Mike Gregory, takes some notes. This guy is hilarious!

Edited by - banjoy on 06/22/2021 07:37:54

Jun 22, 2021 - 11:53:43 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26070 posts since 8/3/2003

quote:
Originally posted by m06

Yep, hover over the ‘sender’s’ name and you’ll see that the email address is not your friend’s email.

The same check works for scammers presenting as if a known company that you use. The actual email is either a faked derivative of the email of the company they’re pretending to be or sometimes bears no relation at all.


I did check the e-mail address and it WAS her address.    So that was a good idea, but doesn't always work.

Jun 22, 2021 - 12:24:29 PM

Brian T

Canada

18366 posts since 6/5/2008

Once a week? I'm getting an urgent notice from Canada Post, our national postal service.
They tell me that I have a package in the distribution warehouse that lacks a shipping address.
I have to pay to get it released. Yeah, but you got my email address.

Canada Post has a very distinctive logo. I would always expect to see that in any correspondence.
Automatically a scam.
Sometimes on the phone, I ask them for the password. I claim that the conversation has to be verified. Click.

Jun 22, 2021 - 1:10:57 PM

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

24835 posts since 6/25/2005

Did Nigeria do away with its royalty? I haven’t heard from a Nigerian prince since well before the pandemic. Maybe they all got nailed by Covid.

Jun 22, 2021 - 1:59:47 PM

Owen

Canada

8984 posts since 6/5/2011

One I heard of* decades ago was phony invoices being sent [think snail mail] to larger corporations, usually for some menial task or other.... eg. clearing snow, mowing grass or minor repairs.  Apparently the internal controls or the clerks or ???? was slack enough that enough invoices got paid without checking to see whether work was actually done to make it worth the scammers' efforts.   I'm guessing the amount of the invoices were chump change for a b-i-g company, relatively speaking.  I suspect today's are more updated (?) technology than a change in the basic principle.

* = that's "heard of," NOT "participated in."   wink

Jun 22, 2021 - 5:30:56 PM
likes this

3167 posts since 10/17/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo
quote:
Originally posted by m06

Yep, hover over the ‘sender’s’ name and you’ll see that the email address is not your friend’s email.

The same check works for scammers presenting as if a known company that you use. The actual email is either a faked derivative of the email of the company they’re pretending to be or sometimes bears no relation at all.


I did check the e-mail address and it WAS her address.    So that was a good idea, but doesn't always work.


You can't tell via the "from" address. There is a thing called spoofing. Spoofs work in various ways. The email address in the from field appears correct; sometimes that info is merely similar. Other times is the actual address... that is actually your actually your friends email; but for example if you dig into the header info will often see it is actually from (and reply) another address/routing. 

 someone had hacked into her e-mail account 

That is not always the case  that it was her email account. Could be hers, yours, or often some mutual connection; that has at some point sent sent or received email from both of you; or perhaps on connection on social media site like Facebook, or some forum like BHO.

Of course most of these scam requests themselves are rather obvious, and really just be ignored. Others can be quite convincing. FWIW never hit any link within the email, one trick they use is having a link to reply to... which is likely a set up for a tech scam, and/or installing malware onto your computer.

Jun 22, 2021 - 6:15:43 PM
likes this

3167 posts since 10/17/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by banjoy

I've mentioned this guy before, James Veitch, who has a ton of YouTube videos (I think he calls himself Sir Scamalot) where he just plays with these scammers. He's done talks about this very scam (stranded friends boo hoo) but I can't find that right now, but this video gives you a flavor of how deep his toying goes...

Here's a TedTalk he gave, Mike Gregory, takes some notes. This guy is hilarious!


yes

If you like that, might check a lot of youtubers channels that are doing similar, actually going out of their way to scam bait; go along posing as gullible victims, stringing them along as much as possible... involving all sorts of scams. Some like Scammer Payback, or KItboga, are hilarious how they string along the the scammers. They also give great insight as to how these various scams work, what the payoffs. And a bit of why folks might fall for it. FWIW, unlike the Nigerian Prince thing... many of these scams can be quite initially convincing.

Some, have taken it a bit further and have infiltrated the scammers, hacked into their systems, spying, and/or deleting files... some like like Jim Browning, intervened to prevent some victims being scammed... and identified the actual place and people.

Although many of these are quite funny... the sad part is that the scams actually work and will get victims, esp elderly.

Edited by - banjoak on 06/22/2021 18:25:07

Jun 22, 2021 - 6:29:04 PM

3167 posts since 10/17/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

Did Nigeria do away with its royalty? I haven’t heard from a Nigerian prince since well before the pandemic. Maybe they all got nailed by Covid.


Most have moved on to other scams. Many have learned much more sophisticated and bit more believable scams. Latest ones involve Covid relief and vaccines.

Jun 22, 2021 - 10:01:08 PM

Brian T

Canada

18366 posts since 6/5/2008

Owen, you can change the technology but the mind-set of the people remains. The scammers will adapt to shifting software but they count on the same BOZO Index in the offices.

City of Prince George BC got scammed. Was not until a couple of contractors called up, asking to be paid. $700k got siphoned off, never to be seen again. Sometimes serious money.

Jun 23, 2021 - 7:48:04 AM

2357 posts since 7/20/2004

Years ago there was a hysterically funny website of a guy who dealt with the Nigerian scammers by playing along with them. Much of it was NSFW, but it was really funny. Looks like there are still some links out there if you Google "Ebola Monkey Man".

Jun 23, 2021 - 7:59:26 AM

112 posts since 4/14/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

One I heard of* decades ago was phony invoices being sent [think snail mail] to larger corporations, usually for some menial task or other.... eg. clearing snow, mowing grass or minor repairs.  Apparently the internal controls or the clerks or ???? was slack enough that enough invoices got paid without checking to see whether work was actually done to make it worth the scammers' efforts.   I'm guessing the amount of the invoices were chump change for a b-i-g company, relatively speaking.  I suspect today's are more updated (?) technology than a change in the basic principle.

* = that's "heard of," NOT "participated in."   wink


My late wife worked for the school district and they were getting invoices such as this for many years. Nothing got paid without a purchase order, regardless of how big or small. They figure with a huge entity such as the school district, they can fly it under the radar. 

Ditn't work!

We have a new one through my employer. We run an agricultural news website with free classified ads. We have had quite a few call in and say they got scammed out of money from a seller in those classifieds, insisting that we knowingly facilitated this practice and demanding we reimburse them, and threatening to call the FBI. After a couple rounds of telling them to dispute the charge with their CC provider, I finally told the last guy to go ahead and call the FBI. Do what you gotta do! 

So far, no calls from agents Mulder or Scully

Jun 23, 2021 - 9:20:55 AM
likes this

Banjo Lefty

Canada

2286 posts since 6/19/2014

Long time ago, more decades than I'd like to say, I worked for a large trucking firm as a claims adjuster. They had a rule that every claim made under a certain dollar amount was to be paid without question, because it would cost more to investigate than the claim was worth. I often wondered how many of the claimants knew this, and how many of those tiny claims were actually scams.

Jun 24, 2021 - 4:52:39 PM

2539 posts since 4/5/2006

What ever happened to all the Caiman Islands scammers?

Jun 24, 2021 - 11:35:29 PM
likes this

3167 posts since 10/17/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

Owen, you can change the technology but the mind-set of the people remains. The scammers will adapt to shifting software but they count on the same BOZO Index in the offices.
 


Yep, Tech scams, delivery scams, refund scams... also target offices; as well as various fake invoice scams, marketing/promotion scams and cons. It can be easy to think just stupid BOZO people fall for it. Some scams are pretty slick and can be fairly convincing; technology can work to make it easier and more convincing.  As well, it's not simply the lowly office worker, but higher ups, managers/bosses/owners... Some of the most vulnerable, are the ones who think are too smart to be fooled; including thinking they have reasonable safeguards or checks in place... so let their guard down. Especially if under stress, dealing with other issues in an office or life. The scammers use that, trying to the victim under further stress, or panic (esp time/deadline)... so they don't relax take a breathe and calmly think about it.

Jun 25, 2021 - 4:38:46 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26070 posts since 8/3/2003

I got a call yesterday that started off: "Hello, grandma....." and I've received this one before. I told the scammer that if he was in trouble, that was his problem and if he was in jail, he probably deserved to be there. He hung up before I could!

Jun 25, 2021 - 5:01:13 AM

2364 posts since 3/29/2008

Sounds like a scam to me. I imagine lots of people have lost money to those kind of things in the past... luckily I've got 2 million dollars coming in from a Nigerian prince in the next few days, so I should be fine.

Edited by - Edthebanjo on 06/25/2021 05:01:33

Jun 25, 2021 - 5:12:52 AM

1119 posts since 9/6/2019
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

I got a call yesterday that started off: "Hello, grandma....." and I've received this one before. I told the scammer that if he was in trouble, that was his problem and if he was in jail, he probably deserved to be there. He hung up before I could!


My mom got caught up in that one a couple of years ago. Her mind isn't what it used to be and she fell for it to the tune of about $1500 before we found out about it and put a stop to it. The thing about it is that no one wants to do anything about it. It was a wire transfer scam and I have a friend that works for Western Union. She looked it up for me and said they had the exact pickup location for the transfer and that the office would have video of the people who picked up the money but they could only release that to law enforcement. When we got the police involved they didn't want to do anything about it and the attitude was "oh well, she lost her money".

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.34375